Sheffield City Council

Sheffield, United Kingdom

Sheffield City Council

Sheffield, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2016 | Award Amount: 283.50K | Year: 2017

Within a context of growing urban population, advances in urban logistics operations and improved local authority planning, especially in the field of the urban freight transport, can alleviate the associated negative environmental and economic impacts occurring in cities. Several types of stakeholders are involved in such urban logistics management processes. Among them, freight carriers and shippers are interested in minimizing freight logistics costs in order to maximize their profits, while maintaining a competitive level of service to their customers. City administrators and residents are oriented towards a decrease in traffic congestion, social costs and environmental nuisances, even though they are often direct beneficiaries of high quality delivery services. This leads to a multitude of differing and possibly conflicting objectives that are involved in urban freight transport planning and decision making, yielding a high level of complexity. This provides a main motivation for the development of tools for helping decision makers to reach higher grades of efficiency. Despite growing academic interest, the extent to which freight transport is acknowledged and formally considered in local authority transport planning varies considerably from country to country, and on a more local level, between towns and cities. As a result, policy development with respect to urban freight and city logistics is characterised by a rather fragmented approach, with many city authorities finding it difficult to address the complex set of differing views of a large variety of stakeholders. The proposed project will be aimed at identifying local authority planning needs with regards to urban/city logistics activities and the necessary pre-requisites for inclusion of stakeholders in the process. Finally, the project will promote the knowledge transfer of methods and models through the conceptual development of a novel decision support tool (thanks to involved software houses).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: NERC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.19M | Year: 2014

This innovative interdisciplinary project aims to develop an easy-to-use, evidence-based resource which can be used in decision-making in drought risk management. To achieve this, we will bring together information from drought science and scenario-modelling (using mathematical models to forecast the impacts of drought) with stakeholder engagement and narrative storytelling. While previous drought impact studies have often focused on using mathematical modelling, this project is very different. The project will integrate arts, humanities and social science research methods, with hydrological, meteorological, agricultural and ecological science knowledge through multi-partner collaboration. Seven case study catchments (areas linked by a common water resource) in England, Wales and Scotland will be selected to reflect the hydrological, socio-economic and cultural contrasts in the UK. Study of drought impacts will take place at different scales - from small plot experiments to local catchment scale. Citizen science and stakeholder engagement with plot experiments in urban and rural areas will be used as stimuli for conversations about drought risk and its mitigation. The project will: (i) investigate different stakeholder perceptions of when drought occurs and action is needed; (ii) examine how water level and temperature affect drought perception; (iii) explore the impact of policy decisions on drought management; (iv) consider water users behaviours which lead to adverse drought impacts on people and ecosystems and; (v) evaluate water-use conflicts, synergies and trade-offs, drawing on previous drought experiences and community knowledge. The project spans a range of sectors including water supply; health, business, agriculture/horticulture, built environment, extractive industries and ecosystem services, within 7 case-study catchments. Through a storytelling approach, scientists will exchange cutting edge science with different drought stakeholders, and these stakeholders will, in turn, exchange their knowledge. Stakeholders include those in: construction; gardeners and allotment holders; small and large businesses; local authorities; emergency planners; recreational water users; biodiversity managers; public health professionals - both physical and mental health; and local communities/public. The stakeholder meetings will capture various data including: - different stakeholder perceptions of drought and its causes - local knowledge around drought onset and strategies for mitigation (e.g. attitudes to water saving, responses to reduced water availability) - insights into how to live with drought and increase individual/community drought resilience - the impact of alternating floods and droughts The information will be shared within, and between, stakeholder groups in the case-studies and beyond using social media. This information will be analysed, and integrated with drought science to develop an innovative web-based decision-making utility. These data will feedback into the drought modelling and future scenario building with a view to exploring a variety of policy options. This will help ascertain present and future water resources availability, focusing on past, present and future drought periods across N-S and W-E climatic gradients. The project will be as far as possible be open science - maintaining open, real-time access to research questions, data, results, methodologies, narratives, publications and other outputs via the project website, updated as the project progresses. Project outputs will include: the decision-making support utility incorporating science-narrative resources; hydrological models for the 7 case-study catchments; a social media web-platform to share project resources; a database of species responses/management options to mitigate drought/post-drought recovery at different scales, and management guidelines on coping with drought/water scarcity at different scales.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.4.2 | Award Amount: 7.50M | Year: 2008

Due to advances in communications, mobile devices and Web technologies, it is nowadays easy for users and organizations to generate and share content, individually or within communities. However, such digital content rapidly reaches a mass that makes relevant information extremely complex and costly to handle. Yet, current applications do not fully support intelligent processing and management of such information. Thus, users fail to access it efficiently and cannot exploit the underlying knowledge.\nThe main objective of WeKnowIt is to develop novel techniques for exploiting multiple layers of intelligence from user-contributed content, which together constitute Collective Intelligence, a form of intelligence that emerges from the collaboration and competition among many individuals, and that seemingly has a mind of its own. To this end, input from various sources is analysed and combined: from digital content items and contextual information (Media Intelligence), massive user feedback (Mass Intelligence), and users social interaction (Social Intelligence) so as to benefit end-users (Personal Intelligence) and organizations (Organisational Intelligence).\nThe automatic generation of Collective Intelligence constitutes a departure from traditional methods for information sharing, since for example, semantic analysis has to fuse information from both the content itself and the social context, while at the same time the social dynamics have to be taken into account. Such intelligence provides added-value to the available content and renders existing procedures and workflows more efficient.\nWeKnowIt will demonstrate the wide applicability of its achievements through the elaboration on two distinct case studies: an Emergency Response and a Consumers Social Group case study. The two use cases pertain to different topics, target at a wide range of intended users and involve heterogeneous business models so that WeKnowIt achieves the highest possible social impact.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-6-2015 | Award Amount: 3.63M | Year: 2016

A seamless interaction with the public administration (PA) is crucial to make the daily activities of companies and citizens more effective and efficient, saving time and money in the management of administrative processes. In particular, online public services have an enormous potential for reducing the administrative burden of companies and citizens, as well as for creating saving opportunities for the PA. This potential is however far from being fully exploited. Online services made available by the PA typically rely on standardized processes, copied from their offline counterparts and designed only from the public sector organizations own perspective. This results in online services that fail to adapt to the specific needs of citizens and companies. With SIMPATICO, we address the issues above by proposing a novel approach for the delivery of personalized online services that, combining emerging technologies for language processing and machine learning with the wisdom of the crowd, makes interactions with the PA easier, more efficient and more effective. SIMPATICO combines top-down knowledge of the PA with bottom-up contributions coming from the community. These contributions can be of different types, ranging from the qualified expertise of civil servants and professionals to problems and doubts raised by citizens and companies that find online services difficult to use. Our approach is able to take into account both explicit information sources coming from citizens, professionals and civil servants, and implicit ones, extracted from user logs and past user interactions. SIMPATICOs learning by doing approach will use this information and match it with user profiles to continuously adapt and improve interactions with the public services. All the collected information on public services and procedures will be made available within Citizenpedia, a collective knowledge database released as a new public domain resource.


Finney K.N.,University of Sheffield | Zhou J.,University of Sheffield | Chen Q.,University of Sheffield | Zhang X.,University of Sheffield | And 7 more authors.
Applied Thermal Engineering | Year: 2015

Decentralised energy in the UK is rare. Cities in the north of England however lead the UK in terms of sustainable, low-carbon, local/district heating, through the implementation of combined-heat-and-power (CHP) facilities; substantial schemes are installed in several cities, including Barnsley and Sheffield. This paper presents the results from extensive experimental and theoretical feasibility studies, in which the merits of these were explored. Barnsley has a number of biomass-fuelled community energy generators, where pollutant monitoring and mathematical modelling were conducted to assess combustion characteristics and overall system performance. Measured pollutant levels were within the relative emission limits, though emission concentrations (CO, CO2, NO and particles) in the flue gas from the coal boiler were higher than the wood pellet boiler. Sheffield already has a citywide district energy network, centred around a sustainably-sourced waste-to-energy facility; an expansion of this scheme was investigated here. This focuses mainly on the link to a 30 MW wood-fired CHP plant, which could be a significant provider of additional thermal capacity (low-grade heat) to an expanded network. Through identifying heat sources and sinks - potential suppliers and end-users - key areas were identified where a connection to the heat network would be feasible. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Finney K.N.,University of Sheffield | Sharifi V.N.,University of Sheffield | Swithenbank J.,University of Sheffield | Nolan A.,Sheffield City Council | And 2 more authors.
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2012

District heating can provide cost-effective and low-carbon energy to local populations, such as space heating in winter and year-round hot/cold water; this is also associated with electricity generation in combined-heat-and-power systems. Although this is currently rare in the UK, many legislative policies, including the Renewable Heat Incentive, aim to increase the amount of energy from such sources; including new installations, as well as extending/upgrading existing distributed energy schemes. Sheffield already has an award-winning district energy network, incorporating city-wide heat distribution. This paper aimed to demonstrate the opportunities for expansions to this through geographical information systems software modelling for an in-depth analysis of the heat demands in the city. 'Heat maps' were produced, locating existing and emerging heat sources and sinks. Heat loads (industrial, commercial, educational, health care, council and leisure facilities/complex) total 53 MW, with existing residential areas accounting for ∼1500 MW and new housing developments potentially adding a further 35 MW in the future. A number of current and emerging heat sources were also discovered - potential suppliers of thermal energy to the above-defined heat sinks. From these, six 'heat zones' where an expansion to the existing network could be possible were identified and the infrastructure planned for each development. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Finney K.N.,University of Sheffield | Chen Q.,University of Sheffield | Sharifi V.N.,University of Sheffield | Swithenbank J.,University of Sheffield | And 3 more authors.
Energy Conversion and Management | Year: 2012

District heating can provide cost-effective and low-carbon energy to local populations. Although this is rare in the UK, Sheffield already has an award-winning district energy network. It has been previously determined that this could be expanded to incorporate new heat sources and sinks. This paper determines the environmental and socio-economic impacts, focussing on various fuels. Combined-heat-and-power generation in Sheffield coupled with sustainable/renewable fuels, like waste, offer high efficiencies (>77%) and consistently lower carbon emission factors (0.04-0.14 kg/MJ) than conventional energy generation using fossil fuels, since up to 80% of the fuel-carbon is biogenic (CO 2-neutral). Processing municipal waste into a refuse-derived fuel prior to combustion or lowering the return-water temperature by 35 °C in the district heating network could further improve efficiencies (81-93%) and reduce CO 2 emission rates by 4 t/h for the Sheffield plant, increasing avoided emissions from 69,000 t/a to 80,000-91,000 t/a. Moreover, ways in which the energy supply could be further decarbonised were identified, as well as methods to minimise the impacts of responding to changes in demand. Though initial costs of such schemes are high, they can be economically-viable for the investor/operator and consequently offer competitive rates for customers. Financial support is also available through government-backed schemes. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Parrott R.,Sheffield City Council
Tizard Learning Disability Review | Year: 2013

Purpose - There are major pressures on social care funding for people with learning disabilities. It is unsustainable to continue working in the same way. The need to promote independence and prevent the need for social care for people with a learning disability is urgent. The purpose of this paper is to highlight key issues, stimulate debate and strengthen the evidence base. Design/methodology/approach - The paper takes evidence from research, literature reviews, statistics and policy debates. It illustrates key points with case studies. The argument for change has been developed in discussion with key stakeholders including the chief executive of a leading self-advocacy organisation. Findings - Demand is increasing whilst funding is reducing. Policy, practice and evidence on prevention of the need for social care for people with a learning disability are underdeveloped. Nevertheless, there are many examples of good practice, and of emerging opportunities for local partnerships to work together to build a new approach. Research limitations/implications - Research on the benefits and costs of prevention of social care for people with a learning disability is underdeveloped. There is a need to extend the evidence base on the range of interventions and their effectiveness. Originality/value - The paper argues for a step change in culture, practice and the focus of research. Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.


Parrott R.,Sheffield City Council
Tizard Learning Disability Review | Year: 2012

Purpose - This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue, "Ten years of partnership". Design/methodology/approach - The commentary reviews practical experience of supporting the participation of people with learning disabilities as active citizens, especially in the context of Learning Disability Partnership Boards. Findings - While there is no cause for complacency, there are many examples of good practice. Most Boards now successfully include people with learning disabilities in the delivery of Valuing People at a local level. Originality/value - The commentary argues for purposeful, continuous improvement and suggests that this requires local leadership, investment of time, energy and effort and building systematically on success. © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 50.00K | Year: 2012

The use of district heating must be expanded drastically if the government is to meet its targets for carbon emissions reductions. Separately, not being able to access digital services is leading to a minority that is being excluded as society embraces the advantages brought by accessibility. Both of these problems can be solved by using existing data connections but need new hardware in the home and need new ways of organising the companies that provide the services. By tackling both at the same time, the technological fixes can be found that will allow businesses to be built around supplying these services. Once this can be shown to work in Sheffield by building on the heat network that is already in place, it opens the door to other cities to follow suit.

Loading Sheffield City Council collaborators
Loading Sheffield City Council collaborators