Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceuticals R and D

Shanghai, China

Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceuticals R and D

Shanghai, China
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Tian J.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Yang J.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Li L.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Ruan L.,Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceuticals R and D | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Biotechnology | Year: 2015

Streptomyces pristinaespiralis produces the streptogramin-like antibiotic pristinamycin, which is a mixture of two structurally different components: pristinamycin I (PI) and pristinamycin II (PII). Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of a high pristinamycin-producing strain HCCB10218 (8.5. Mb) obtained by using PacBio RSII combined with Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencing system. The genome sequence presented here provides clues for the mechanism underlying the higher pristinamycin production of HCCB10218. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Li L.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Zhao Y.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Ruan L.,Shanghai Laiyi Center for Biopharmaceuticals R and D | Yang S.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | And 4 more authors.
Metabolic Engineering | Year: 2015

Pristinamycin, which is a streptogramin antibiotic produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, contains two chemically unrelated compounds, pristinamycin I (PI) and pristinamycin II (PII). Semi-synthetic derivatives of PI and PII have been approved for use in human medicine to treat a broad range of drug-resistant pathogens. In this study, we design and implement a combinatorial metabolic engineering strategy for improving PII production. First, an extra copy of the PII biosynthetic gene cluster, which was assembled using a modified Gibson assembly method for cloning large DNA fragments with high GC contents, was introduced into a high-producing strain S. pristinaespiralis HCCB10218. This duplication of the PII biosynthetic gene cluster resulted in a maximum increase in PII titer by 45%. Second, all seven cluster-situated regulatory genes (from papR1 to papR6 and spbR) were systematically manipulated. Higher PII titers were achieved by deleting either one of the two repressor genes papR3 or papR5 in combination with overexpression of both activator genes papR4 and papR6, and the resulting strains {increment}. papR3+. R4R6 and {increment}. papR5+. R4R6 showed maximum increases in PII production by 99% and 75%, respectively. A combination of the above two different approaches was employed. Integration of the assembled PII gene cluster (BAC-F1F15) into {increment}. papR5+. R4R6 led to the highest PII titer improvement, which was approximately 1.5-fold higher than the parental strain. By adding the macroreticular resin, which can separate pristinamycin in situ and thereby lessen end-product feedback inhibition and toxic effects, PII titers of the final engineered strain {increment}. papR5+. R4R6/BAC-F1F15 reached 1.13 and 1.16. g/L in the Erlenmeyer flask and 5-L bioreactor, respectively, with 5.13- and 5.26-fold improvements over the parental strain. Taken together, this combinatorial strategy is an efficient method to optimize PII biosynthesis of S. pristinaespiralis and may be extended to other industrially used streptomycetes for strain improvement. © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society.


Dun J.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Zhao Y.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Zheng G.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Zhu H.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Bacteriology | Year: 2015

There are up to seven regulatory genes in the pristinamycin biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, which infers a complicated regulation mechanism for pristinamycin production. In this study, we revealed that PapR6, a putative atypical response regulator, acts as a pathway-specific activator of pristinamycin II (PII) biosynthesis. Deletion of the papR6 gene resulted in significantly reduced PII production, and its overexpression led to increased PII formation, compared to that of the parental strain HCCB 10218. However, either papR6 deletion or overexpression had very little effect on pristinamycin I (PI) biosynthesis. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that PapR6 bound specifically to the upstream region of snaF, the first gene of the snaFE1E2GHIJK operon, which is likely responsible for providing the precursor isobutyryl-coenzyme A (isobutyryl-CoA) and the intermediate C11 αβ-unsaturated thioester for PII biosynthesis. A signature PapR6-binding motif comprising two 4-nucleotide (nt) inverted repeat sequences (5'-GAGG-4 nt-CCTC-3') was identified. Transcriptional analysis showed that inactivation of the papR6 gene led to markedly decreased expression of snaFE1E2GHIJK. Furthermore, we found that a mutant (snaFmu) with base substitutions in the identified PapR6-binding sequence in the genome exhibited the same phenotype as that of the ΔpapR6 strain. Therefore, it may be concluded that pathway-specific regulation of PapR6 in PII biosynthesis is possibly exerted via controlling the provision of isobutyryl-CoA as well as the intermediate C11 αβ-unsaturated thioester. © 2015, American Society for Microbiology.


Zhao Y.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Feng R.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Zheng G.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | Tian J.,CAS Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Bacteriology | Year: 2015

Pristinamycin I (PI), produced by Streptomyces pristinaespiralis, is a streptogramin type B antibiotic, which contains two proteinogenic and five aproteinogenic amino acid precursors. PI is coproduced with pristinamycin II (PII), a member of streptogramin type A antibiotics. The PI biosynthetic gene cluster has been cloned and characterized. However, thus far little is understood about the regulation of PI biosynthesis. In this study, a TetR family regulator (encoded by SSDG_03033) was identified as playing a positive role in PI biosynthesis. Its homologue, PaaR, from Corynebacterium glutamicum serves as a transcriptional repressor of the paa genes involved in phenylacetic acid (PAA) catabolism. Herein, we also designated the identified regulator as PaaR. Deletion of paaR led to an approximately 70% decrease in PI production but had little effect on PII biosynthesis. Identical to the function of its homologue from C. glutamicum, PaaR is also involved in the suppression of paa expression. Given that phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) is the common intermediate of the PAA catabolic pathway and the biosynthetic pathway of L-phenylglycine (L-Phg), the last amino acid precursor for PI biosynthesis, we proposed that derepression of the transcription of paa genes in a ΔpaaR mutant possibly diverts more PA-CoA to the PAA catabolic pathway, thereby with less PA-CoA metabolic flux toward L-Phg formation, thus resulting in lower PI titers. This hypothesis was verified by the observations that PI production of a ΔpaaR mutant was restored by L-Phg supplementation as well as by deletion of the paaABCDE operon in the ΔpaaR mutant. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the regulation of PI biosynthesis by S. pristinaespiralis. © 2015, American Society for Microbiology.

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