Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability

Shanghai, China

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability

Shanghai, China
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Li J.,Tongji University | Chen Y.,Tongji University | Chen Y.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability | Wu Q.,Tongji University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Alloys and Compounds | Year: 2017

The Fe3O4/MnO2/RGOs (Reduced graphene oxide) sandwich-like nano-superstructures reported in this article were fabricated by using an eco-friendly mechanical stirring route at room temperature without any catalysts or templates. In this nano-superstructure, three-dimensional (3D) hierarchical MnO2 shell was assembled by two-dimensional (2D) nanoplates and Fe3O4/MnO2 core-shell was coated by RGO layers. The sandwich-like nano-superstructures show better electrochemical performance comparing to the pure MnO2 and Fe3O4/MnO2 nanoparticles. The maximum specific capacitance can reach 77.5 F/g at the current density of 0.5 A/g and maintain 35.0 F/g (55% of SC at 0.5 A/g) at the current density of 20 A/g. It was found that the electrocapacitive performances of the Fe3O4/MnO2/RGO electrodes are highly affected by the connection effectiveness between Fe3O4/MnO2 particles and graphene layers. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Qin M.,Tongji University | Lin Z.,Tongji University | Lin Z.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability | Lin Z.,Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality | And 4 more authors.
Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology | Year: 2016

Bacteria in the environment face the threat of antibiotics. However, most studies investigating the toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics have been conducted on microorganisms in aerobic conditions, while studies examining the anaerobic toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics are still limited. In this study, we determined the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities of sulfonamides (SAs) on Escherichia coli. Next, a comparison of the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities indicated that the SAs could be divided into three groups: Group I: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)>log(1/EC50-aerobic) (EC50-anaerobic/EC50-aerobic, the median effective concentration under anaerobic/aerobic conditions), Group II: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)≈log(1/EC50-aerobic), and Group III: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)


Zheng M.,Tongji University | Yao Z.,Tongji University | Lin Z.,Tongji University | Lin Z.,Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2016

Organisms are exposed to mixtures of multiple contaminants and it is necessary to build prediction models for the joint effects, considering the high expense and the complexity of the traditional toxicity testing and the flood occurrence of environmental chemical pollutants. In this study, a new method for predicting the joint effects was developed and corresponding prediction models were constructed based on the kinetic models of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. While, we utilized Vibrio fischeri, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as model organisms and determined the chronic toxicity of the binary mixtures of sulfonamides (SAs) and sulfonamide potentiators (SAPs) (SA + SAP), the mixtures of two kinds of sulfonamides (SA + SA) and the binary mixtures of sulfonamide potentiators (SAPs) and tetracyclines (TCs) (SAP + TC) respectively. Finally, corresponding mixture toxicity data was utilized to fit and verify the prediction models for different joint effects. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Wang T.,Tongji University | Liu Y.,Tongji University | Wang D.,Tongji University | Lin Z.,Tongji University | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2016

Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) are considered to be promising antibiotic alternatives and will be increasingly exposed to the environment together with antibiotics after their research and development process; it is therefore necessary to study the joint effects of QSIs and antibiotics. In this study, single and mixed toxicity of sulfonamide (SAs) and QSIs under acute and chronic conditions and their corresponding toxicity mechanisms were investigated. The results indicated that the acute joint effect was extremely complex, ranging from an antagonistic to synergistic response, while the chronic joint effect was primarily an antagonistic response. Using a molecular docking and regression model, we found that the acute joint effect could be determined by the hydrion's, ability to be oxidized, as well as the binding energy. The chronic joint effect was primarily an antagonistic response, which was due to the QSI competing against AHL for luxR generated by SAs, leading to negative effects of the QSI-luxR complexes on luxI. This phenomenon eventually weakened the stimulatory effect caused by SAs. Finally, the main differences between acute and chronic mixtures were analyzed: (1) The target protein was different between acute and chronic toxicity mixtures, and (2) effective concentration in acute and chronic toxicity mixtures was also different. These deep insights into mixed toxicity mechanisms will play an important role in the study of antibiotic resistance genes in response to antibiotic replacements. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Tongji University and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability
Type: | Journal: Journal of hazardous materials | Year: 2016

Organisms are exposed to mixtures of multiple contaminants and it is necessary to build prediction models for the joint effects, considering the high expense and the complexity of the traditional toxicity testing and the flood occurrence of environmental chemical pollutants. In this study, a new method for predicting the joint effects was developed and corresponding prediction models were constructed based on the kinetic models of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. While, we utilized Vibrio fischeri, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis as model organisms and determined the chronic toxicity of the binary mixtures of sulfonamides (SAs) and sulfonamide potentiators (SAPs) (SA+SAP), the mixtures of two kinds of sulfonamides (SA+SA) and the binary mixtures of sulfonamide potentiators (SAPs) and tetracyclines (TCs) (SAP+TC) respectively. Finally, corresponding mixture toxicity data was utilized to fit and verify the prediction models for different joint effects.


PubMed | Tongji University and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Chemical Assessment and Substainability
Type: | Journal: Environmental toxicology and pharmacology | Year: 2016

Bacteria in the environment face the threat of antibiotics. However, most studies investigating the toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics have been conducted on microorganisms in aerobic conditions, while studies examining the anaerobic toxicity and toxicity mechanisms of antibiotics are still limited. In this study, we determined the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities of sulfonamides (SAs) on Escherichia coli. Next, a comparison of the aerobic and anaerobic toxicities indicated that the SAs could be divided into three groups: Group I: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)>log(1/EC50-aerobic) (EC50-anaerobic/EC50-aerobic, the median effective concentration under anaerobic/aerobic conditions), Group II: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)log(1/EC50-aerobic), and Group III: log(1/EC50-anaerobic)

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