Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease

Shanghai, China

Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease

Shanghai, China
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Hao Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Hao Y.,Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes | Hao Y.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | Hao Y.,Shanghai Diabetes Institute | And 33 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Objective: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum vitamin D level and carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) in Chinese postmenopausal women. Methods: Nine hundred and twenty six Chinese postmenopausal women without carotid artery plaque or history of cardiovascular disease were selected for analysis. Measurements of serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) concentration and C-IMT were made by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay and B-mode ultrasound, respectively. Trend analysis was conducted according to tertiles of C-IMT. Results: The median serum 25(OH)D3 level was 11.03 ng/mL, with an interquartile range of 8.22-14.70. A decreasing trend of serum 25(OH)D3 level was accompanied by increased C-IMT tertiles (P for trend = 0.001). Correlation analysis found an inverse relationship between serum 25(OH)D3 level and C-IMT (r = -0.113, P = 0.001). After adjustment for confounding factors, multiple regression analysis showed that serum 25(OH)D3 level independently and negatively associated with C-IMT (Standard β = -0.112, P < 0.001). Moreover, the inverse correlation of serum 25(OH)D3 with C-IMT was also found in a subgroup of women with normal glucose tolerance, blood pressure and body mass index, and without undergoing lipid-lowering therapy (standard β = -0.140, P = 0.018). Conclusions: Serum 25(OH)D3 level was inversely correlated with C-IMT in Chinese postmenopausal women. © 2015 Hao et al.


Hao Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Hao Y.,Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes | Hao Y.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | Hao Y.,Shanghai Diabetes Institute | And 32 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2015

Context: Previous studies have demonstrated evidence of a positive relationship between serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) and obesity. However, associations of A-FABP with body composition and ectopic fat accumulation remain unclear. Objective: This study aimed to elucidate the effect of body composition, visceral fat area (VFA), and subcutaneous fat area (SFA) on serum A-FABP levels in a cohort of Chinese women without diabetes mellitus. Design, Setting, and Participants: A total of 2108 women without diabetes (760 premenopausal and 1348 postmenopausal women; age, 20-78 y) selected from the Shanghai Obesity Study were enrolled. Main Outcome Measures: VFA and SFA were measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and body composition was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. A high VFA was defined as ≥ 80 cm2. A high SFA was defined as that above the 75th percentile cutoff point of the menopausespecific population, respectively. Results: Serum A-FABP levels were higher in postmenopausal than premenopausal women (P < .001). Both premenopausal and postmenopausal women with an isolated high VFA had higher A-FABP levels than did those with an isolated high SFA (P = .017 and .002, respectively). In both body mass index (BMI) groups (< 25 and ≥ 25 kg/m2), women with a high VFA had higher serum A-FABP levels regardless of their menopausal status. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that A-FABP was independently associated with fat mass (Standardized β = 0.417 and 0.252 for premenopausal and postmenopausal status, respectively, both P < .001). Moreover, VFA was identified as an independent risk factor for A-FABP in postmenopausal women (Standardized β = 0.114, P = .001). Application of the same regression analyses model to the two BMI groups produced similar results in both BMI categories. Conclusions: Serum A-FABP levels were associated with fat mass, and were also influenced by VFA after menopause in Chinese women without diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2015 by the Endocrine Society.


Wang C.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Wang C.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | Zheng H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Zheng H.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | And 22 more authors.
Pharmacogenomics Journal | Year: 2015

Alendronate is an antiosteoporotic drug that targets the mevalonate pathway. To investigate whether the genetic variations in this pathway affect the clinical efficacy of alendronate in postmenopausal Chinese women with osteopenia or osteoporosis, 23 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 genes were genotyped in 500 patients treated with alendronate for 12 months. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured at baseline and after 12 months. The rs10161126 SNP in the 3′ flanking region of MVK and the GTCCA haplotype in FDFT1 were significantly associated with therapeutic response. A 6.6% increase in BMD in the lumbar spine was observed in the GG homozygotes of rs10161126; AG heterozygotes and AA homozygotes experienced a 4.4 and 4.5% increase, respectively. The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of G allele carriers to be responders in lumbar spine BMD was 2.06 (1.08-6.41). GTCCA haplotype in FDFT1 was more frequently detected in the group of responders than in the group of non-responders at the total hip (2.6 vs 0.5%, P=0.009). Therefore, MVK and FDFT1 polymorphisms are genetic determinants for BMD response to alendronate therapy in postmenopausal Chinese women. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Zheng H.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Zheng H.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | Shao C.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Shao C.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | And 11 more authors.
Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism | Year: 2015

Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II (ADO-II) is a heritable bone disorder characterized by osteosclerosis, predominantly involving the spine (vertebral end-plate thickening, or rugger-jersey spine), the pelvis (“bone-within-bone” structures) and the skull base. Chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) has been reported to be the causative gene. In this study, we aimed to identify the pathogenic mutation in four Chinese families with ADO-II. All 25 exons of the CLCN7 gene, including the exon–intron boundaries, were amplified and sequenced directly in four probands from the Chinese families with ADO-II. The mutation site was then identified in other family members and 250 healthy controls. In family 1, a known missense mutation c.296A>G in exon 4 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in a tyrosine (UAU) to cysteine (UGU) substitution at p.99 (Y99C); the mutation was also identified in his affected father. In family 2, a novel missense mutation c.865G>C in exon 10 was identified in the proband, resulting in a valine (GUC) to leucine (CUC) substitution at p.289 (V289L); the mutation was also identified in her healthy mother and sister. In family 3, a novel missense mutation c.1625C>T in exon 17 of CLCN7 was identified in the proband, resulting in an alanine (GCG) to valine (GUG) substitution at p.542 (A542V); the mutation was also identified in her father. In family 4, a hot spot, R767W (c.2299C>T, CGG>TGG), in exon 24 was found in the proband which once again proved the susceptibility of the site or the similar genetic background in different races. Moreover, two novel mutations, V289L and A542V, occurred at a highly conserved position, found by a comparison of the protein sequences from eight vertebrates, and were predicted to have a pathogenic effect by PolyPhen-2 software, which showed “probably damaging” with a score of approximately 1. These mutation sites were not identified in 250 healthy controls. Our present findings suggest that the novel missense mutations V289L and A542V in the CLCN7 gene were responsible for ADO-II in the two Chinese families. © 2015 The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer Japan


Hao Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Hao Y.,Shanghai Clinical Center for Diabetes | Hao Y.,Shanghai Key Clinical Center for Metabolic Disease | Hao Y.,Shanghai Diabetes Institute | And 33 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology | Year: 2014

Summary: Perturbed serum vitamin D levels have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) levels and B ultrasonography-detected carotid plaque and carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT) in Chinese middle-aged and elderly men. In all, 1001 men, aged 45-78 years, were enrolled in the study. Increased C-IMT was defined as any C-IMT value in the highest quartile of the study subjects (≥ 0.75 mm). The study population had a median serum 25(OH)D3 level of 14.51 ng/mL (interquartile range (IQR) 10.84-18.67 ng/mL). Subjects with carotid plaques had lower serum 25(OH)D3 levels than those without (13.80 (IQR 10.82-17.68) vs 14.74 (IQR 10.87-19.08) ng/mL, respectively; P = 0.029), and decreasing serum 25(OH)D3 levels were accompanied by increased C-IMT in both groups (13.24 (IQR 9.91-16.81) vs 14.45 (IQR 11.40-18.51) ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.05) in those with plaque; 13.80 (IQR 9.99-17.09) vs 14.99 (IQR 11.17-19.43) ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.01) in those without plaque). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that serum 25(OH)D3 levels were independently associated with carotid plaque (odds ratio (OR) 0.972; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.946-0.998; P = 0.032). In addition, serum 25(OH)D3 levels were identified as an independent protective factor for increased C-IMT among subjects with plaque (OR 0.900; 95% CI 0.849-0.955; P = 0.001) and those without plaque (OR 0.944; 95% CI 0.908-0.981; P = 0.004). Collectively, these findings suggest that serum 25(OH)D3 levels are inversely associated with atherosclerosis in Chinese middle-aged and elderly men. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

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