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Fang W.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | Ye L.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | Shen L.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | Cai J.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | And 9 more authors.
Carcinogenesis | Year: 2014

Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can promote cancer initiation and progression by releasing cytokines. Previously, we have found the density of TAMs correlated with lymph node metastasis in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). However, the mechanisms of how TAMs promote PTC progression remain unclear. In this study, we first showed that the TAMs density in the tumor core was associated with progressive PTC features and TAMs conditioned medium enhanced PTC cells invasion. Cytokine profiling identified a mixed M1/M2 phenotype and CXCL8 was the most consistently abundant cytokine in PTC-derived TAMs. CXCL8 receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, were positively stained in PTC cell lines and tissues, though no association with lymph node metastasis or extrathyroid extension. PTC cell invasion was abrogated by anti-CXCL8-neutralizing antibody, whereas addition of exogenous recombinant human CXCL8 enhanced the invasiveness. More importantly, CXCL8 promoted PTC metastasis in vivo. No difference was found for TAMs-derived CXCL8 expression in patients with and without lymph node metastasis or extrathyroid extension. These findings indicated that TAMs may facilitate PTC cell metastasis through CXCL8 and its paracrine interaction with CXCR1/2. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. Source


Jiang Y.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | Jiang Y.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Zhang C.,Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and Shanghai E institute for Endocrinology | Zhang C.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2015

Background: Adrenal venous sampling is recommended as the golden standard for subtyping primary aldosteronism (PA). However, it is invasive and inconvenient, and seeking a better way to make differential diagnosis of PA is necessary. Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of ACTH stimulation test under 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST) in determining the subtypes of PA. Methods: Ninety-five patients with PA confirmed by saline infusion test were included in this study. According to adrenal venous sampling and histopathology, 39 patients were diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH), 37 as aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA), and 19 as unilateral adrenal hyperplasia (UAH). An ACTH stimulation test under 1 mg DST was performed in all patients. Plasma aldosterone and cortisol levels were measured every 30 minutes until 120 minutes after the iv injection of 50 IU ACTH. Results: During the ACTH stimulation test, aldosterone levels in APA and UAH were similar (P > .05) but higher than those in BAH (P < .001). Furthermore, stimulated aldosterone levels of unilateral PA (APA and UAH) were significantly higher than bilateral PA (BAH) (P < .001). Receiver-operated characteristics curve analyses showed the aldosterone after ACTH stimulation was effective for distinguishing between unilateral PA and bilateral PA. The diagnostic accuracy was highest at 120 minutes after ACTH stimulation, and the optimal cutoff value of the aldosterone was 77.90 ng/dL, with a sensitivity of 76.8%, a specificity of 87.2%, a positive predictive value of 89.6%, and a negative predictive value of 72.3%. Conclusions: The ACTH stimulation test under 1 mg DST is useful to determine the subtypes of PA, especially in unilateral and bilateral PA, and may guide further treatment in PA patients. © 2015 by the Endocrine Society.doi:. Source

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