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PubMed | Fudan University, Tongji University and Dahua Hospital Shanghai
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of clinical and experimental medicine | Year: 2016

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which hypertension (HT) interacts with diabetes mellitus (DM) to affect diastolic heart failure (DHF) in a high-risk population.We conducted a hospital-based case-control study to investigate the relationship between HT or DM and DHF in 251 patients (case: 133 patients with DHF; control: 118 patients without DHF). Echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. The association between HT or DM and DHF was assessed by multivariate logistic regression (MLR) analysis controlling for confounders. The effect of the interaction between HT and DM on DHF was assessed in MLR models. Interaction on an additive scale can be calculated by using the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI), the proportion attributable to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S).The MLR analyses showed that HT and DM were independent predictors of DHF after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 2.35-3.14, P<0.05 for all models). DHF was affected by the interaction between HT and DM (ORInt = 3.11-4.31, P Int<0.1, RETI = 2.13-2.69, AP = 0.38-0.49 and S = 4.11-6.80).The findings provide evidence that HT and DM are independent predictors of DHF and that both risk factors act synergistically to influence DHF in a Chinese high-risk population.


PubMed | Dahua Hospital Shanghai
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of clinical and experimental pathology | Year: 2015

Genetic variation in OCT1 can influence the glycemic response to metformin. We evaluated the effects of the OCT1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1867351, rs4709400, rs628031, and rs2297374, on metformin efficacy in type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients.We performed a single-center prospective analysis of the distributions of these SNPs in a cohort of Han Chinese subjects in Shanghai, China (HCS), and evaluated the effects of each SNP on glycemic control in HCS DM patients following 3 months of incident metformin treatment.The allele frequencies of rs4709400 and rs628031 in our HCS control group differed from those previously reported for Han Chinese subjects in Beijing (HCB), as well as those previously reported for Caucasians and Africans, whereas the allele frequencies of rs1867351 and rs2297374 were more similar to those in HCB subjects. The DM patients with the rs1867351 T/T or rs4709400 G/G genotype exhibited greater reductions in postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), compared to those with different genotypes of these SNPs. The DM patients with the rs2297374 C/T, rs4709400 G/G, or rs628031 G/G genotype exhibited greater reductions in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and those with the rs1867351 T/T, rs628031 A/A, or rs2297374 C/T genotype exhibited greater reductions in HbA1c , compared to those with different genotypes of these SNPs. Conclusions /interpretation: The rs1867351, rs4709400, rs628031, and rs2297374 SNPs of OCT1 have selective effects on FPG, PPG, and HbA1c in HCS DM patients in response to metformin treatment. Future studies of these SNPs in larger samples of HCS DM patients are warranted.

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