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Tatartchenko V.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Liu Y.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Chen W.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Smirnov P.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co.
Earth-Science Reviews | Year: 2012

This paper is the third one from the series of papers with the same titles published in this journal. The papers consider the infrared characteristic radiation (IRCR) during the first order phase transitions of water: crystallization, water vapor condensation, and water vapor deposition. Experimental results are analyzed in terms of their correspondence to the theoretical model. This model is based on the assertion that the particle's (atom, molecule, or cluster) transition from the higher energetic level in a metastable phase (vapor or liquid) to a lower level in a stable phase (liquid or crystal) produces an emission of one or more photons. The energy of these photons depends on the latent energy of the phase transition and the character of bonds formed by the particle in the new phase. For all investigated substances, this energy falls in the infrared range. Recorded in the atmosphere, numerous sources of the infrared radiation seem to be a result of crystallization, condensation and deposition of water during fog and cloud formation. The effect under investigation must play a very important role in atmospheric phenomena: it is one of the sources of Earth's cooling; formation of hailstorm clouds is accompanied by intensive IRCR that could be detected for process characterization and meteorological warnings. IRCR seems to be used for atmospheric energy accumulation and together with the wind, falling water, solar and geothermal energies makes available the fifth source of ecologically pure energy. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. Source


Vitali T.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Liu Y.-F.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Wu Y.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | Zhou J.-J.,Shanghai CEC Zhenhua Crystal Technology Co. | And 9 more authors.
Wuli Xuebao/Acta Physica Sinica | Year: 2013

We have studied the specimens made of amino acids arranged in a linear chain and joined together by peptide bonds between the carboxyl and amino groups of adjacent amino acid residues. The sequence of amino acids in a protein is defined by a gene and encoded in the genetic code. This can happen either before the protein is used in the cell, or as part of control mechanism. This paper considers a new physical phenomenon-infrared characteristic radiation (IRCR) at first order phase transitions (melt crystallization, and vapor condensation and/or deposition). Experimental results are analyzed in terms of their correspondence to the theoretical model. This model is based on the assertion that the particle's (atom's, molecule's, or cluster's) transition from a higher energetic level in a metastable or unstable phase (vapor or liquid) to a lower level in a stable phase (liquid or crystal) can emit one or more photons. The energy of these photons depends on the latent energy of the phase transition and the character of bonds formed by the particles in the new phase. For all investigated substances, this energy falls in the infrared range. This is a reason why the radiation is named as IRCR-infrared characteristic radiation. Many sources of the infrared radiation recorded in the atmosphere seem to be a result of crystallization, condensation and/or sublimation of water during fog and cloud formation. Thus, the effect under investigation must play a very important role in atmospheric phenomena: it is one of the sources of Earth's cooling; formation of hailstorm clouds is accompanied by intensive characteristic infrared radiation that could be used for process characterization and meteorological warnings. IRCR seems to explain red color of Jupiter. It can be used for atmospheric energy accumulation, and, thus, together with wind, falling water, solar and geothermal energies, IRCR makes available the fifth source of ecologically pure energy. © 2013 Chinese Physical Society. Source

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