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Ding D.,Shanghai University | Ding D.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Wei S.,Shanghai University | Wei S.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 10 more authors.
Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry | Year: 2013

Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate how Osthole affects glioma cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration. Methods: Rat glioma cells were treated with different concentrations of Osthole (0 μM, 25 μM, 50 μM, and 100 μM). Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring PCNA expression and CCK8 assay at different time points. Apoptosis was evaluated by measuring the expression of pro-apoptotic protein including Bax, Bcl2, PARP, and cleaved Caspase3, and of anti-apoptotic protein Survivin. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using different methods. Signaling pathways such as PI3K/Akt and MAPK, which are involved in the development of glioma cells, were also investigated in this study. Results: Treatment with Osthole markedly inhibits glioma cell proliferation, as assessed by western blot with the PCNA antibody. Osthole also induces cell apoptosis by upregulating the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, and by reducing the expression of anti-apoptotic factors. Moreover, C6 cell migration and invasion were efficiently inhibited in groups treated with Osthole, compared to the control group. Additionally, inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAPK signaling pathway was also observed in C6 cells treated with Osthole. Conclusions: Our findings showed an anti-cancer effect of Osthole on glioma cells, including the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis induction, and migration/invasion inhibition. Further investigation in C6 glioma cells implicated the role of Osthole in essential pathways controlling glioma cell progression. Taken together, our data suggested that Osthole may have a potential application in glioma therapy. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Kong L.J.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Kong L.J.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Fang M.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Zhan H.S.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 4 more authors.
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2012

Non-specific low back pain (NLBP) is an increasing health problem for athletes. This randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of Chinese massage combined with herbal ointment for NLBP. 110 athletes with NLBP were randomly assigned to experimental group with Chinese massage combined with herbal ointment or control group with simple massage therapy. The primary outcome was pain by Chinese Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (C-SFMPQ). The secondary outcome was local muscle stiffness by Myotonometer. After 4 weeks, the experimental group experienced significant improvements in C-SFMPQ and in local muscle stiffness compared with control group (between-group difference in mean change from baseline, -1.24 points, P=0.005 in sensory scores; -3.14 points, P<0.001 in affective scores; -4.39 points, P<0.001 in total scores; -0.64 points, P=0.002 in VAS; -1.04 points, P=0.005 in local muscle stiffness during relaxation state). The difference remained at one month followup, but it was only significant in affective scores (-2.83 points, P<0.001) at three months followup. No adverse events were observed. These findings suggest that Chinese massage combined with herbal ointment may be a beneficial complementary and alternative therapy for athletes with NLBP. © 2012 Ling Jun Kong et al.


PubMed | Fudan University, Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Experimental and therapeutic medicine | Year: 2016

Previous clinical trials have suggested that the Chinese Tuina massage may exert transient analgesic effects. However, further investigation regarding the underlying mechanism has been hindered by the lack of a suitable animal model of pain. The present study established a rat model of hind leg pain by injecting 5.8% hypertonic saline solution (HSS) into the left gastrocnemius muscle. The effects of various Tuina massages on the pain thresholds of the rats were then measured. In addition, the effects of ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massages on C-fiber-evoked field potentials following electrical stimulation of the left sciatic nerve were determined. Alterations in the gastrocnemius muscle tissues following various Tuina applications were investigated using hematoxylin and eosin, and desmin staining, as well as malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase assays. Heavy hand pressure transiently reduced the pain sensitivity of both posterior limbs, despite HSS only being injected into the left hind leg. Tuina massage treatments that lasted for 15 min were associated with the best results and an absence of local tissue changes. The results of electrical sciatic nerve stimulation demonstrated that ipsilateral and contralateral Tuina massage may decrease the level of peripheral nociceptive C-fiber activity. In the present study, the Chinese Tuina massage exerted analgesic effects in a rat model of pain, which did not involve tissue damage, following a 15 min massage. Therefore, the rat model of pain used in the present study may provide a novel approach for investigating the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of Tuina massage.


Wang X.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Cao Y.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Cao Y.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Pang J.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 7 more authors.
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective. To assess the short-term efficacy and safety of two kinds of Traditional Chinese herbal patches, Fufang Nanxing Zhitong Gao (FNZG) and Shangshi Jietong Gao (SJG), for painful knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. Patients were randomly enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study to receive FNZG (n=60), SJG (n=60), or placebo patch (n=30) for 7 days. Outcome measures included visual analogue scale (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Traditional Chinese Medicine Syndrome Questionnaire (TCMSQ) subscale. Results. Although there was no significant difference among, three groups in short-term pain management, patients receiving FNZG got significant improvement in symptom of fear of coldness as compared with placebo patch (P=0.029). The most common local adverse events of rash, itching, erythema, and slightly damaged skin were observed in 7 of participants. Conclusions. FNZG may be a useful treatment for symptom of knee OA and merits long-term study in broader populations. Copyright 2012 Xuezong Wang et al.


He T.-X.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Cheng Y.-W.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science | Year: 2013

In order to understand clinical research advance on palpation for cervical 'vertebral subluxation', we have retrieved, sorted and analyzed relevant literature on 'vertebral subluxation' palpation from database both home and abroad. The study has suggested that static palpation is the major method for cervical 'vertebral subluxation' palpation and motion palpation for cervical segmental mobility has great clinical significance. However, there is no sufficient evidence or 'gold standard' regarding motion palpation. As a result, the future research priority should be put on rigorous clinical studies according to evidence-based diagnostic trial design. This can help to assess palpation method for 'vertebral subluxation' objectively, scientifically and practically, thus providing standardized palpation procedures for spinal manipulation. © 2013 Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Wang X.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Wei S.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Liu T.,Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine | Pang J.,Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine | And 6 more authors.
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2014

Objective. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the evidence whether traditional Chinese herbal patches (TCHPs) for osteoarthritis (OA) are effective and safe and analyze their medication patterns. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using all the possible Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and keywords from January 1979 to July 2013. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. Estimated effects were analyzed using mean difference (MD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and meta-analysis. Results. 86 kinds of TCHPs were identified. RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) which were mostly of low quality favored TCHPs for local pain and dysfunction relief. TCHPs, compared with diclofenac ointment, had significant effects on global effectiveness rate (RR = 0.50; 95% CI (0.29, 0.87)). Components of formulae were mainly based on the compounds "Xiao Huo Luo Dan" (Minor collateral-freeing pill) and "Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang" (Angelicae Pubescentis and Loranthi decoction). Ten kinds of adverse events (AEs), mainly consisting of itching and/or local skin rashes, were identified after 3-4 weeks of follow-up. Conclusions. TCHPs have certain evidence in improving global effectiveness rate for OA; however, more rigorous studies are warranted to support their use. © 2014 Xuezong Wang et al.


PubMed | Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: World journal of gastroenterology | Year: 2016

To study the anti-fibrotic mechanism of amygdalin, a component of Semen Persicae, on fat-storing cells (FSC).Livers of normal adult rats were perfused with Pronas E and collagenase in situ. FSC were isolated by centrifugation with 11% Metrizamide. The subcultured FSC were incubated with 10(-4)-10(-8) mol/L amygdalin for 72 h, and then FSC proliferation and collagen production were assayed, respectively.Low doses of amygdalin reduced incorporation of L-[(3)H]-thymidine into FSC and L-[5-(3)H]-proline into secreted collagenase-sensitive proteins and cell layer-associated collagenase-sensitive proteins. the strongest effects were seen for the 10(-8) mol/L dose of amygdalin, which inhibited the proliferation of FSC by 25.0%, and decreased collagen production in medium and cell layer by 24.2% and 26.8%, respectively.An anti-fibrotic mechanism of amygdalin is to inhibit the proliferation and collagen production of active FSC.


PubMed | Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Rejuvenation research | Year: 2015

It is known that bone healing is delayed in the presence of osteoporosis in humans. However, due to the complexities of the healing of osteoporotic fractures, animal models may be more appropriate for studying the effects of osteoporosis in more detail and for testing drugs on the fracture repair process. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of ovariectomy-induced osteopenia in bone healing in an open femoral osteotomy model, and to test the feasibility of this model for evaluating the healing process under osteopenic conditions.Ovariectomized (OVX) mouse models were employed to assess the effects of osteopenia on fracture healing, A mid-shaft femur osteotomy model was also established 3 weeks after ovariectomy as an osteopenic fracture group (OVX group). Femurs were then harvested at 2 weeks and 6 weeks after fracture for X-ray radiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), histology, and biomechanical analysis. A sham-operated group (sham group) was used for comparison.The OVX mice had significantly lower bone volume density (BVF), volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and tissue mineral density (TMD) in the fracture calluses at 6 weeks (p<0.05), and similar trend was observed in 2 weeks. Additionally, larger calluses in OVX animals were observed via micro-CT and X-ray, but these did not result in better healing outcomes, as determined by biomechanical test at 6 weeks. Histological images of the healing fractures in the OVX mice found hastening of broken end resorption and delay of hard callus remodeling. The impaired biomechanical measurements in the OVX group (p<0.05) were consistent with micro-CT measurements and radiographic scoring, which also indicated delay in fracture healing of the OVX group.This study provided evidence that ovariectomy-induced osteopenia impair the middle and late bone healing process. These data also supported the validity of the mouse femoral osteotomy model in evaluating the process of bone healing under osteopenic conditions.


PubMed | Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Type: | Journal: Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM | Year: 2014

Objective. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the evidence whether traditional Chinese herbal patches (TCHPs) for osteoarthritis (OA) are effective and safe and analyze their medication patterns. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using all the possible Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and keywords from January 1979 to July 2013. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies were included. Estimated effects were analyzed using mean difference (MD) or relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and meta-analysis. Results. 86 kinds of TCHPs were identified. RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) which were mostly of low quality favored TCHPs for local pain and dysfunction relief. TCHPs, compared with diclofenac ointment, had significant effects on global effectiveness rate (RR = 0.50; 95% CI (0.29, 0.87)). Components of formulae were mainly based on the compounds Xiao Huo Luo Dan (Minor collateral-freeing pill) and Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang (Angelicae Pubescentis and Loranthi decoction). Ten kinds of adverse events (AEs), mainly consisting of itching and/or local skin rashes, were identified after 3-4 weeks of follow-up. Conclusions. TCHPs have certain evidence in improving global effectiveness rate for OA; however, more rigorous studies are warranted to support their use.


PubMed | Boston University, Shanghai Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Psoriasis is considered a systemic inflammatory disorder. Previous studies have reported conflicting positive or negative correlations between psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether there is an associated risk between psoriasis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We performed a complete 30-year literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register databases on this topic. Four observational studies with a total of 13,418 subjects were identified. The odds ratios of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in subjects with psoriasis/mild-to-moderate psoriasis were analyzed using the random-effects model, while the odds ratios of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in subjects with severe psoriasis and current smoking in subjects with psoriasis were analyzed using the fixed-effect model. We found that psoriasis patients were at a greater risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease than the general population (odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.36-2.65) and that the association between of psoriasis and with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was stronger among patients with severe psoriasis (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-3.67). Psoriasis patients should be advised to cease smoking to reduce their risk of COPD. Moreover, identification of this potential risk may enable earlier implementation of preventive measures for reduction comorbidity and mortality rates.

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