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Su Q.,Shandong University | Su Q.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Zhang J.,Shandong University | Li M.,Shandong University | Li M.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials
Thin Solid Films | Year: 2013

The diamond single crystal, synthesized with Fe-Ni-C-B system of catalyst under high temperature and high pressure, had been observed by field emission scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The presence of a cellular structure suggested that the diamond grew from melted catalyst solution and there existed a zone of component supercooling zone in front of the solid-liquid interface. The main impurities in the diamond crystal was (FeNi)23C6. The triangle screw pit revealed on the (111) plane was generated by the screw dislocation meeting the diamond (111) plane at the points of emergence of dislocations. A narrow twin plane was formed between the two (111) plane. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Zhang N.,Shandong University | Zhang N.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Li M.-S.,Shandong University | Li M.-S.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | And 4 more authors.
Rengong Jingti Xuebao/Journal of Synthetic Crystals | Year: 2010

By additing of different contents of boron carbides in the iron-based catalysts, the boron-doped diamond single crystals had been synthesized under high pressure and high temperature. The resistances of the diamonds with different boron concentration were measured by a digital electric bridge and the self-made electrode clamps. The variations of photon numbers were detected by a cathodeluminescence. The phase structures were characterized by XRD. The results show that the specific resistance of the boron-doped diamonds significantly decreased with the increase of boron concentration and to be a semiconductor. It is indicated that the boron doping promotes the growth of (111) face of the diamonds, enhances acceptor level, narrow's band gap and increases carrier concentration correspondingly.


Gong J.-H.,Shandong University | Gong J.-H.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Li M.-S.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Li M.-S.,Shandong University | And 6 more authors.
Rengong Jingti Xuebao/Journal of Synthetic Crystals | Year: 2010

The surface morphology of the boron-doped diamond single crystals was analyzed by means of Olympus optical microscope, scanning electronic microscope(SEM) and atom force microscopy(AFM). Various features are found on the crystal surfaces of the boron-doped diamond such as pits, spherical clusters, parallel steps, petal-like knobs and triangle spiral steps, which distinguish to those on the surface of plain diamonds. These features are concerning to the dislocations of the crystal lattices. The boron atoms accelerate the diamond growth and increase the dislocation. It is demonstrated that the screw dislocation growth pattern should be the main growth mechanism of the boron-doped diamond.


Su Q.,Shandong University | Su Q.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Zhang J.,Shandong University | Yin L.,Shandong University | And 3 more authors.
Advanced Materials Research | Year: 2012

The field emission scanning electron microscope is applied in this paper to analyze the surface topography of diamond crystal synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. The research shows that parallel steps, jagged steps, hexagonal hills exist on (111) plane of diamond. The topography has a relation to the growth way of diamond. The (111) planes of diamond crystal mainly grow in layer mode.


Su Q.,Shandong University | Su Q.,Shandong Engineering Research Center for Superhard Materials | Zhang J.,Shandong University | Yin L.,Shandong University | And 3 more authors.
Advanced Materials Research | Year: 2012

The microstructure of catalyst discs and fracture topography of boron-doped diamond blocks are analyzed in this paper. The results show that boron can promote or inhibit the growth of diamond crystal. The battens of metal carbides in catalyst are the main carbon source in the nucleation and growth of diamond. Crystal nucleus can absorb the carbon atoms from metal carbide in catalyst disc, and continually grow. It is resulted that the carbon atoms around the diamond grains in catalyst disc reduce, and the battens of metal carbides are thin. The more diamond grains are produced, the thinner battens of metal carbides in catalyst disc are formed.

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