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Shang L.,Shandong Province Climate Center | Liu Y.,CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics | Tian W.,Lanzhou University | Zhang Y.,CAS Institute of Atmospheric Physics
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences | Year: 2015

We used a fully coupled chemistry–climate model (version 3 of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, WACCM3) to investigate the effect of methane (CH4) emission increases, especially in East Asia and North America, on atmospheric temperature, circulation and ozone (O3). We show that CH4 emission increases strengthen westerly winds in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, accelerate the Brewer–Dobson (BD) circulation, and cause an increase in the mass flux across the tropopause. However, the BD circulation in the tropics between 10°S and 10°N at 100 hPa weakens as CH4 emissions increase in East Asia and strengthens when CH4 emissions increase in North America. When CH4 emissions are increased by 50% in East Asia and 15% globally, the stratospheric temperature cools by up to 0.15 K, and the stratospheric O3 increases by 45 ppbv and 60 ppbv, respectively. A 50% increase of CH4 emissions in North America (with an amplitude of stratospheric O3 increases by 60 ppbv) has a greater influence on the stratospheric O3 than the same CH4 emissions increase in East Asia. CH4 emission increases in East Asia and North America reduce the concentration of tropospheric hydroxyl radicals (4% and 2%, respectively) and increase the concentration of mid-tropospheric O3 (5% and 4%, respectively) in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes. When CH4 emissions increase in East Asia, the increase in the tropospheric O3 concentration is largest in August. When CH4 emissions increase in North America, the increase in the O3 concentration is largest in July in the mid-troposphere, and in April in the upper troposphere. © 2015, Chinese National Committee for International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Science Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. Source

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