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Ju H.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | Ju H.,Shaanxi University of Science and Technology | Lv S.,Shaanxi University of Science and Technology | Sun T.,Shaanxi University of Science and Technology | Kong X.,Shaanxi University of Science and Technology
Gaofenzi Cailiao Kexue Yu Gongcheng/Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering | Year: 2014

Graphene (GN) and silicone-acrylate emulsion composites were prepared by joining graphene solution which was obtained by chemical reduction-oxidation and ultrasonic dispersion into acrylic emulsion. The graphene was characterized by XRD, AFM and IR and the composite films were characterized by SEM, TG, electrical conductivity, anti-corrosion performance test, mechanics performance and water resistance test. The results show that the graphene obtained from graphene oxide by reduction reaction is better and was successfully dispersed with nanoscale thickness. The composites exhibit excellent electrical properties with a percolation threshold as low as 0.5% and a stable volume resistance below 103 ω·cm when the graphene content is more than 0.9%. In addition, when the additive amount of GN reached 0.7%, compared with silicone acrylate emulsion, the tensile strength of the composite materials increases by 15.5%, the elongation at break decreases by 3.6% and the decomposition temperature increases nearly 43℃, the performance of resistance to water increases by 14% and corrosion resistance is greatly improved. Source


Gao C.,Northwest University, China | Gao C.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | Guo A.,Northwest University, China | Li X.,Northwest University, China | And 2 more authors.
Geological Bulletin of China | Year: 2015

Aimed at exploration of basin-mountain coupling relationship between North Qinling Mountains and Liuyehe basin, the authors employed the detrital zircons age dating of the Carboniferous-Permian sedimentary rocks from Liuyehe basin located in North Qinling Mountains. The U-Pb dating results of 82 zircons gave rise to six age groups in an age range of 264±5~2834±40 Ma, 260~542 Ma, 800~1100 Ma, 1320~1560 Ma, 1640~2250 Ma, 2300~2660 Ma and 2720~2870 Ma. Among the groups, the 260~542 Ma age group represents the largest proportion of the measured points, followed in succession by 1640~2250 Ma group, 2300~2660 Ma group and 800~1100 Ma group. A comparative study of the age structure and the Carboniferous cross-bedding shows that the provenance of the Liuyehe basin during the Carboniferous-Permian was probably located in the North Qinling Mountains during the Late Paleozoic. In addition, the detrital zircon age structure comparison shows that the sedimentary rocks of the southern Ordos basin and the Liuyehe basin have the same age spectrum characteristics, which in turn means that they had the same provenance during the Permian. Under the influence of late Caledonian orogeny, North Qinling area experienced rapid uplift and eventually completed the evolution of basin-mountain conversion. Later, along with the Shangdan strike-slip fault, the Liuyehe basin began to form due to the opening-up of the Mianlue Ocean, while the North Qinling Mountains became its main provenance. ©, 2015, Science Press. All right reserved. Source


Wang Y.,Northwest University, China | Wang Y.,University of Wyoming | Jiao Z.,University of Wyoming | Jiao Z.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | And 9 more authors.
Energy Procedia | Year: 2013

Rich in energy resources, China's Ordos Basin shares many similarities with Wyoming's Powder River Basin. As a result, the experience and expertise pertaining to energy development in the Powder River Basin should prove helpful in the Ordos Basin. The basin's coal, coalbed methane and natural gas reserves are ranked first in China, and its oil reserves are ranked fourth. The coal deposits in the Ordos Basin account for 39 percent of total Chinese coal reserves (3.98 trillion tonnes), and six of the thirteen largest coal mines in China are located in the basin. The overlapping development of relatively new coal conversion industries with existing oil and gas industries in northern Shaanxi Province is creating an opportunity to apply the systematic approach developed in Wyoming: The integration of geological CO2 storage and CO2-EOR. The coal conversion industry (i.e., coal-to-methanol, coal-to-olefins, etc.) provides affordable, capture-ready CO2 sources for developing large-scale integrated CO2-EOR and carbon storage projects in the Ordos Basin, China. Compared with other CCUS projects, the ability to use CO2 from the coalconversion industry for CO 2-EOR and subsequent geological CO2 storage will make integrated projects in the Ordos Basin more cost-effective and technologically efficient. The low porosity, low permeability, low oil saturation, anomalously low reservoir pressure, and high reservoir heterogeneity of the target storage formations in the Ordos Basin make using CO2 for enhanced oil recovery much more challenging here than in the US. These reservoir characteristics together constitute a major reason that CO2- EOR is not widely employed in the Ordos Basin, even though sources of highly concentrated CO2 (coal conversion plants) have been available for years. Comparisons of reservoir and crude oil properties in the Ordos Basin with the current US CO2-EOR screening guidelines reveal that gravity, viscosity, crude oil composition, and formation type of the Ordos reservoirs all are favorable for CO2 miscible flooding. The major challenges in deploying EOR result from anomalously low reservoir pressure, low porosity, and higher reservoir heterogeneity. Source


Luo T.,Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University | Luo T.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | Zhou L.,Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University | Zhou L.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | And 5 more authors.
Energy Procedia | Year: 2014

A cooperative project between Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering and the Carbon Management Institute of University of Wyoming is being carried on in the Ordos Basin, aiming to integrate CO2 storage with CO2 -EOR. This paper reports on the characterization of the targeted reservoir where CO2 is to be injected. Characterization of the reservoir provides the basis for a geologic model to support the CO2 injection simulation, and to develop injection strategies. Petrophysical well-logs were integrated with detailed core descriptions, thin sections and core analysis data into provide insight to the reservoir characteristics, pore structure features, and depositional environments. The upper Triassic Yanchang Formation, composed of clastic rocks is the main reservoir in the study and is located at field A in the Shaanbei slope of the Ordos basin. Although the field has been developed since 2003, water flooding development at present is constrained by low permeability, low porosity, high heterogeneity, high capillary pressure and high content of cementing material. The sandstone of the Yanchang Formation is essentially a delta front subfacies depositional system and has two main microfacies. One is sub-aqueous distributary channel, with an average porosity of 10.31% and permeability of 0.35x10-3μm2; the other is interdistributary bay. Integration of petrophysical well-logs, detailed core descriptions, thin sections and core analysis data provide insight into the facies interpretation, and provide the basis for the later reservoir modelling and injection simulation. The next step will be to build a 3D geologic model and then choose the most suitable sand body to perform on injection simulation. Although many CO2 -EOR projects have been proven effective and bring satisfactory financial. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Source


Zunsheng J.,Carbon Management Institute | Zunsheng J.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | Lifa Z.,Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering | Tingting G.R.L.,Petroleum Group Company | And 4 more authors.
Energy Procedia | Year: 2014

In the current global economic and technological environment, integrating geological CO2 storage with enhanced oil recovery is the most practical way to reduce green-house gas emissions and increase the energy supply (CCUS). The overlapping development of large-scale coal conversion industries with existing oil and gas industries in the Ordos Basin, Northern Shaanxi Province has created a unique opportunity to apply a systematic approach to an energy/environmental protection development strategy: The integration of geological CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery utilizing CO2 flooding (CO2 EOR) and geological storage that has been developed in Wyoming. The coal conversion industry in the Ordos Basin (i.e., coal-to-methanol, coal-to-olefins, etc.) provides affordable, captureready CO2 sources for developing large-scale CO2 EOR and CO2 storage projects in the Ordos Basin, China. Currently, over 40 Mt of highly concentrated CO2 (> 95%) are being captured and vented from the methanol plants. Compared with other CCS projects, the ability to use CO2 from the coal-conversion industry for CO2 EOR and geological CO2 storage will make these CCUS projects in the Ordos Basin more cost effective, technologically efficient, and environmentally sound. Supported by US-China Clean Energy Research Center, Shaanxi Provincial Government, and Yanchang Petroleum Group Company, the University of Wyoming, Shaanxi Provincial Institute of Energy Resources and Chemical Engineering, and Research Institute of Yanchang Petroleum (Group) Company have developed a CO2 enhanced oil recovery demonstration project that includes geological CO2 storage in a mature, depleted oil field located in the Northern Shaanxi Province, Ordos Basin. Various scenarios for enhanced oil recovery using CO2 flooding integrated with geological CO2 storage are being simulated and optimized. The results of the reservoir characterization and CO2 flooding simulation show that integrating CO2 EOR with geological COv storage is a viable way to reduce CO2 emission in the region. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Source

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