Washington, MI, United States
Washington, MI, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Tung D.J.,Ohio State University | Lolla T.,Ohio State University | Babu S.S.,University of Tennessee at Knoxville | Cola Jr. G.M.,SFP Works
Advanced Materials and Processes | Year: 2013

The article discusses the specifics of flash processing, microstructural evolution during processing, the industrial impact of flash processed materials, and ongoing research to further extend the capabilities of FP steels. Flash processing is an extremely rapid heat treatment with a total process time of less than 10 seconds. A low-temperature, short-duration tempering treatment is often used to increase ductility. The process produces a well controlled, mixed microstructure consisting of martensite, bainite, and carbides. Flash-processed microstructures depend on the initial microstructure and nonequilibrium conditions resulting from high heating rates, short hold times, and high cooling rates. Due to the carbon concentration gradients, regions of high carbon undergo a martensitic transformation, while regions of low carbon undergo a bainitic transformation. Martensite is the primary strengthening constituent and bainite provides ductility, resulting in a balance of strength and ductility unique to flash processing.


Hanhold B.,Ford Motor Company | Babu S.S.,Ohio State University | Cola G.,SFP Works
Science and Technology of Welding and Joining | Year: 2013

Heat affected zone (HAZ) softening in two armour steels (high hard and flash processed) was investigated by monitoring phase transformations during simulated welding thermal cycles. The high hard steel was produced by conventional thermomechanical processing followed by quench and tempering. Flash processed steel was produced by rapid heating and cooling of a spheroidised steel to produce a mixed microstructure. Heat affected zone softening in high hard steel was observed on heating to a peak temperature below Ac1 due to overtempering of the original microstructure. In flash processed steel, the softening was associated with allotriomorphic ferrite formation when heated to a peak temperature between Ac1 and Ac3. The above results demonstrate the importance of initial microstructure on HAZ on phase transformation transients and associated softening in armour steels. © 2013 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.


Hanhold B.,Ohio State University | Hanhold B.,Ford Motor Company | Babu S.S.,Ohio State University | Cola G.,SFP Works
Science and Technology of Welding and Joining | Year: 2013

Flash processed (FP) steels have shown potential for armour applications based on the response to ballistic loading. In this research, weldability of these steels was studied and compared to commercial high hard (HH) armour steel. Simulated heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructures in these steels were investigated by comprehensive microscopy and hardness mapping. HAZ softening in HH steel was observed on heating to a peak temperature below Ac1 due to overtempering of original microstructure. In FP steel, the softening was associated with allotriomorphic ferrite formation when heated to a peak temperature between Ac1 and Ac3. The transformation kinetics, softening, and hardening characteristics are rationalised based on changes in prior austenite grain size, cooling rate and underlying chemical heterogeneity. © 2013 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.


Cola Jr. G.M.,SFP Works | Hanhold B.,Ford Motor Company | Lolla T.,Ohio State University | Radhakrishnan B.,Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Babu S.,Ohio State University
Iron and Steel Technology | Year: 2013

Conversion equations were employed to compare tensile elongations of various advanced high-strength steels (AHSS), which were tested with different sample geometries. Researchers were cautioned in using conversion equations for comparing total elongation of AHSS, which were processed by different routes with strengths greater than 1,000 MPa. Many researchers also realized that the sample gauge length and cross-sectional area of tensile test samples potentially had an effect on the total elongation of the sample. The need for a standard specimen for comparing the different steels was recognized, as researchers used different specimen geometries for testing of their advanced high-strength steels. Some researchers also proposed a methodology to convert the measured total elongation from tensile tests with differing sample sizes using the Oliver equation.


Lolla T.,Ohio State University | Cola G.,SFP Works | Narayanan B.,Ohio State University | Alexandrov B.,Ohio State University | Babu S.S.,Ohio State University
Materials Science and Technology | Year: 2011

Flash processing of an AISI8620 steel sheet, which involves rapid heating and cooling with an overall process duration of<10 s, produced a steel microstructure with a high tensile strength and good ductility similar to that of advanced high strength steels. Flash processed steel [ultimate tensile strength (UTS): 1694 MPa, elongation: 7·1%], showed at least 7% higher UTS and 30% greater elongation than published results on martensitic advanced high strength steel (UTS: 1585 MPa, elongation: 5·1%). The underlying microstructure was characterised with optical, scanning electron, transmission electron microscopy as well as hardness mapping. A complex distribution of bainitic and martensite microstructures with carbides was observed. A mechanism for the above microstructure evolution is proposed. © 2011 Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining.


The invention discloses a process and apparatus for micro-treating an iron-based alloy including heating and immediately quenching to room temperature to produce high tensile iron-based alloy with varying thicknesses. The process may or may not be practiced with or without tension, under various controllable tensions in order to create desirable effects. The micro-treated iron-based alloy contains desirable bainite to increase its formability and tensile strength. The varying thickness of the iron-based alloys is desirable for different applications, such as forming automobile panels.


The invention discloses a process and apparatus for micro-treating an iron-based alloy including heating and immediately quenching to room temperature to produce high tensile iron-based alloy with varying thickness. The process may or may not be practiced with or without tension under various controllable tensions in order to create desirable effects. The micro-treated iron-based alloy contains desirable bainite to increase its formability and tensile strength. The varying thickness of the iron-based alloys is desirable for different applications, such as forming automobile panels.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.00M | Year: 2015

The Department of Energy (DOE) has pursued multiple strategies for making vehicles lighter and more fuel efficient. Past efforts have focused on either developing technologies to replace heavy steel components or using high-strength steels to reduce the amount of steel needed for the same load-bearing capacity. However, these techniques have proved problematic because the former requires expensive exotic materials and expensive factory retooling for manufacturers, while the latter involves using high strength steels that require expensive alloying elements or are brittle and unsuitable for automotive applications. SFP Works has developed a novel heat treating process to create low-cost, very high-strength steel known as Flash Processing or Flash Bainite that uses a thermal cycle of less than 10 seconds to create a ductile and weldable steel well suited or the automotive industry. In this proposed effort, SFP Works will a) further develop SBIR Phase I proven methods by showing commercial feasibility of room temperature forming/stamping of Flash Bainite 1500MPa and b) create complete process parameterization and weld schedules for multiple Flash alloys for full scale commercialization leading to a weight/cost savings of 33-50% of the metal in a vehicle. In Phase I, SFP Works formed Flash Processed steel for automotive structural applications and conducted preliminary evaluations with an automotive OEM to determine the suitability of those parts for automotive applications. In the Phase II effort, SFP Works will define Flash processing specifications and characterize the resultant material in grades, compositions, and formats relevant to automotive applications. SFP Works will also conduct application trials, experiments, and evaluations with relevant automotive OEM and suppliers in order to validate characterization data. Flash Processed steel will provide Americans with lighter more fuel efficient vehicles that also perform as well, or better, in all passenger protection safety tests. Additionally, Flash Processed steels could allow for cranes with longer boom lengths and increased lifting capacity, and farm machinery, military equipment, line pipe, and pressure vessels that are lighter and easier to transport yet just as durable.


Cola G.M.,SFP Works
ASM International - 28th Heat Treating Society Conference, HEAT TREATING 2015 | Year: 2015

Flash® Bainite Processing employs rapid thermal cycling (<1 Os) to strengthen commercial off the shelf (COTS) steel sheet, plate, and tubing into AHSS. In a continuous process, induction technology heats a narrow segment of the cross section in just seconds to atypically high temperatures (1000- 1300°C). Quenching substantially immediately follows. Flash® Processing utilizes inherent heterogeneity of steel creating multi-chemistry, complex mixtures of approximately 20% bainite and 80% martensite. Carbide dissolution and carbon migration are controlled by limiting time in the austenite temperature range. Unlike conventional heat treating to create advanced high strength steels (AHSS), homogeneity is intentionally avoided and non-equilibrium conditions are created. The leanest prior ferritic regions transform to bainite while prior pearlite forms martensite. A 7-10% higher yield/tensile strength product results with the beneficial ductility of the bainite constituent. Flashed AIST1OIO (IlOOMPa UTS) and AlSllO2O (l500MPa UTS) have shown exceptional room temperature stamp-ability toOT/IT bend radii. The 1500MPa formability of 3G-AHSS is achievable. Flash® Bainite offers simultaneous weight and cost savings. © 2015 ASM International®.


SFP Works | Entity website

Intellectual Property Insurance IPISC, the industry leader in Intellectual Property Insurance, has been in the business of managing risk and protecting the value of clients IP assets for over 23 years. We have developed products that use advanced strategies to become market leaders in the dynamic field of IP insurance ...

Loading SFP Works collaborators
Loading SFP Works collaborators