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Ren D.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Ren D.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | Wang H.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Wang H.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Holzforschung | Year: 2015

The mechanical properties of cell wall layers of bamboo fibers (BFs) and the interphase between BFs and maleated polypropylene polymer (MAPP) were investigated by means of peakforce quantitative nanomechanics based on atomic force microscopy. This technique is well suited for simultaneous imaging of several important material indicators, such as elastic modulus, deformation at peak force, and adhesion force between probe tip and sample. Furthermore, quantitative local mechanical information could be extracted from the obtained images by means of profile analysis. In case of BFs, the elastic modulus of the secondary cell wall and the compound middle lamella was found to be 21.3±2.9 GPa and 14.4±3.6 GPa, respectively, which agrees well with data measured by the nanoindentation technique. Additionally, this technique was also applied for bamboo plastic composites, and data from the transitional zone (interphase) between BFs and the MAPP matrix, with a thickness of 102±18 nm, could be obtained. © 2015 by De Gruyter.


Ren D.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Ren D.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | Yu Z.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Yu Z.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | And 6 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2014

Bamboo fibers are known for their outstanding mechanical properties and could be a potential replacement for synthetic fibers used in fiber-reinforced composites. In this paper, mechanical variation related to age for elementary fibers of two important sympodial bamboo species (Dendrocalamopsis oldhami and Dendrocalamus latiflorus Munro) was analyzed using a microtension technique. From the investigation of elementary fibers ranging from 1 to 6 years in age, our results showed the average tensile modulus of the two types of bamboo fibers ranged from 42.84. GPa to 44.29. GPa and 33.51. GPa to 37.35. GPa, whereas the tensile strength ranged from 1.50. GPa to 1.70. GPa and 1.34. GPa to 1.52. GPa, respectively. These values are significantly higher than equivalent properties found in most natural plant fibers. Furthermore, bamboo fibers were found to have nearly reached their optimal mechanical properties after just 1 year, with subsequent variations in older fibers proving statistically insignificant. This highlights the suitability of using young bamboo fibers as the reinforcing phase in polymer composites. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Wang H.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Wang H.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | Zhang X.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Zhang X.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | And 6 more authors.
Industrial Crops and Products | Year: 2015

Mainly composed of fibers and parenchymal cells with strikingly different chemical compositions and cell wall structures, bamboo represents an important alternative resource for bio-refinery. Therefore, this study proposes a potentially novel, low-energy consumption approach for producing high-quality nanocellulose fibrils (NCFs) made from bamboo at large scale. For this purpose, bamboo pulping sheets (mainly composed of fibers) and bamboo processing residues (mainly composed of parenchymal cells) were chosen as starting materials from which NCFs were isolated with a simple high-pressure homogenization process. Wet chemical analysis, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), and microtensile tests were applied to investigate the effects different cell types had on the properties of prepared NCFs, as well as the amount of energy required to produce them. The results show that the energy required for isolating NCFs from parenchymal cells was significantly lower than that from bamboo fibers, while the quality of NCFs produced from the two types of cells were similar. In addition to the relative ease of the procedure and the low-energy required, as bamboo processing residues produced in a number of industrial bamboo applications normally contain a high ratio of parenchymal cells and can be obtained at relatively low costs, this represents a very promising source of raw material for the production of NCFs. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Wang H.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Wang H.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | Tian G.,International Center for Bamboo And Rattan | Tian G.,SFA and Beijing Co built Key Laboratory of Bamboo and Rattan Science and Technology | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Wood Science | Year: 2015

The mechanical response of bamboo fibers to variation in moisture content (MC) has a direct influence on the performance of bamboo fiber-based products, both during their processing and final practical applications. However, due to the experimental difficulties involved in testing, this fundamental process remains poorly understood. In this paper, longitudinal tensile modulus (TE), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation at break (EB) for four different MC levels, ranging from approximately 4.97 to 26.2 %, were determined for single bamboo fibers aged 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 years old, respectively. For each MC level, the results show that both TE and UTS of bamboo fibers vary little with age. A general linear reduction is observed for both TE and UTS when MC increases, while EB shows a slight increase. Furthermore, TE is found to be most sensitive to MC change, followed by UTS and then EB. A close examination revealed that 2.5-year-old bamboo fibers are more sensitive to MC change than younger specimens, which may partly be related to their relatively higher microfibrillar angel (MFA). A direct TE–MC plot comparison between bamboo fibers and solid bamboo not only demonstrates the decisive role of the fiber component in the overall mechanical response to MC of bamboo, but also reveals that the TE of the former is less sensitive to varying MC levels than the latter. © 2015, The Japan Wood Research Society.

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