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News Article | December 30, 2015
Site: news.yahoo.com

The Zoological Society London (ZSL), whose mission is to promote and achieve the world-wide conservation of animals and their habitats, says it may have taken a step closer to fulfilling that with the development of a new camera, which it calls Instant Detect. Developed in partnership with other companies like Seven Technologies Group, which specializes in security technology and helped train rangers on conservation sites on how best to use Instant Detect devices, ZSL hopes it could help the fight against poaching, as well as the monitoring of endangered and other species. In the last 40 years 95 percent of rhinoceroses have been poached and more than 100,000 African elephants from 2011-2014 have been illegally killed, according to the charity group. Instant Detect is a camera trap system that uses satellite technology to send images from anywhere in the world, according to ZSL Conservation Technology Unit Project Manager, Louise Hartley. "It's a camera that we would deploy in the wild, it has to be quite sturdy and it often uses motion triggers, so it will have a passive infrared sensor to detect heat changes, so as an animal or a person walks past an image will be captured, and it's just a great way to get an insight into the wild that you wouldn't be able to do if you were a person," she said. The satellite node uses a Raspberry Pi computer to send the images via the Iridium satellite network, which is a satellite constellation providing voice and data coverage to satellite phones, pagers and other integrated transceivers. A filter moves across the lens detecting the change from day to night and adjusting the camera accordingly, so it can see in the dark using night vision. According to Hartley, it has two main uses - monitoring and catching poachers. "We have a deployment in Antarctica to monitor penguins, so we're getting images back daily to look at the penguin behavior and also look at environmental change in that area," she said. "We're also using it for anti-poaching purposes to improve security within protected areas. So an alert, an image, would be sent to an operations room and then rangers can then react accordingly to that alert," she added. If an intruder enters a protected area the camera picks that up and sends an alert. It also has magnetic sensors that can pick up cars, guns and even knives, also triggering the alert to local rangers. The Instant Detect box has a camera lens in the middle, surrounded by an LED array used for night-time imagery using infrared flash - "so when it goes off you won't be able to see it, it's not visible to the human eye," said Hartley. "We have here the passive infrared sensor, so that's the motion detector, so it detects heat change, so as a person or a species is walking in it will trigger an image to be taken," she added, "you can also set it to timelapse so you can set an image to be taken every four hours or every five hours for example." The crucial part, though, is how it talks to ZSL's monitors and to local rangers. "You have the antenna attached to the top here, and then you would have a battery pack attached to the bottom here. When an image is taken there's a separate unit called the satellite node, and the images are sent via radio frequency to the satellite node and then the satellite node uses the Iridium Satellite Network to send that image to where you need it," Hartley said. Other anti-poaching technologies have come to the fore recently, including the Real-Time Anti-Poaching Intelligence Device (RAPID) developed by conservation organization Protect with support from the Humane Society International. DNA analysis, acoustic traps, thermal imaging and improving analytics and mapping are all contributing to the fight against poaching as well. ZSL hopes that Instant Detect could be a crucial addition to that growing arsenal, in what remains a battle with high costs. The Kruger Park, South Africa's main tourist draw, is one place on the front-line of the battle against a surge in rhino poaching for the animal's horn to meet demand in countries such as Vietnam, where it is a coveted ingredient in traditional medicine. The poaching of rhinos there rose in 2015, although it was on the decline elsewhere in the country.


Ghazaany T.S.,Seven Technologies | Zhu S.,Seven Technologies | Alhameed R.A.,University of Bradford | Noras J.M.,University of Bradford | And 4 more authors.
Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society Journal | Year: 2016

An experimental study of coupling compensation for AOA estimation using compact low profile antenna arrays with element separations of a quarter wavelength has been conducted. Two circular arrays of low profile miniaturised logarithmic spiral antennas deployed on a circular metal plate were used for data acquisition. Using the MUSIC direction-finding algorithm, the AOA estimation errors in receiving mode were observed before and after compensation: the errors were significantly decreased by coupling compensation. © 2016 ACES.


Zhu S.,University of Bradford | Ghazaany T.S.,University of Bradford | Jones S.M.R.,University of Bradford | Abd-Alhameed R.A.,University of Bradford | And 5 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation | Year: 2014

The Rician K-factor of the vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) wireless propagation channel is estimated using a moment-based method on the envelope of measured pulse data. The measurements were carried out under vehicle-to-vehicle wireless communication channel condition with car rooftop antenna heights at one end of the link and very low antenna height at the other end. Data captured from typical urban, suburban and rural areas are analyzed and the K-factor probability density function is generated for each scenario to give an insight into the V2V channel behavior. For all three areas, the majority of K values are found to be within the range of -10 to +10 dB. The K-factor distributions are close to normal with mean values of 1.8, 2.6 and 3 dB respectively for urban, suburban and rural area. © 1963-2012 IEEE.


Ghazaany T.S.,University of Bradford | Zhu S.,University of Bradford | Jones S.M.R.,University of Bradford | Alhameed R.A.,University of Bradford | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Radio and Wireless Symposium, RWS | Year: 2014

In this paper the sensitivity of the decoupling matrix used for mutual coupling compensation in small size uniform circular arrays has been studied. The compensation matrix is calculated using the receiving mode technique for a 5-element uniform circular array and applied to two groups of direction finding algorithms, namely phase comparison-based (interferometry) and subspace-based algorithms. In the tracking application considered the receiver array is deployed on a car roof or aircraft, so the geometry of the platform influences the compensation results. In this work, the effect of different ground plane geometries in terms of the standard deviation of angular error for each estimation algorithm using simulation results is investigated. The results show that the calibration conditions used to determine the compensation matrix affect the AOA estimation accuracy. © 2014 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Collaborative Research & Development | Award Amount: 504.04K | Year: 2015

The Intelligent Multifactor Endpoint Security (IMES) system brings high security connectivity to remote workers in an affordable, intelligent and easy to use solution. Designed to address the security challenges of Remote Working and BYOD it introduces innovative multi-factor authentication requiring minimal input from the User. Three factor Authentication is provided by: LIOPA Speaker Verification technology to establish liveness and biometric characteristics of the User; An Authentication Service pairs autonomously with a low Energy RF token; and a profiling service checks User metrics (working pattern, device identity and network connectivity). Once authenticated Users connect through a local Proxy server which provides a ‘CleanWeb’ whitelist for safer browsing or through to their nominated Endpoint resource. The VPN service is available for IOS, Android and Windows supporting PPTP, OpenVPN SSL, and L2TP/IPsec. DNS traffic is encrypted removing the risk of ‘Man in the Middle attacks’ typical with BYOD hardware. The VPN Service protects the User’s privacy from local or remote interception over shared networks and protects their geographic location from the wider internet.


A computer system for converting data from one of a plurality of different legacy systems to one of a plurality of different target systems includes one or more processors, memory, a database stored in the memory, and a software framework stored in the memory for execution by the one or more processors. Each of the plurality of different legacy systems has a legacy data format and each of the plurality of different target systems has a target data format. The software framework includes a plurality of software components callable by an output adaptor for performing a plurality of data conversion functions. The software framework is configured to interact with each of the plurality of different legacy systems having the legacy data format and/or each of the plurality of different target systems having the target data format. Other example computer systems and methods are also disclosed.


Maritime Remote ImageryAtlantic OceanSeven Technologies Group adapted an existing capability to capture hi-resolution still images from maritime technical collection buoys. The buoys are deployed hundreds of miles offshore and transmit images thousands of miles, utilizing the Iridium Satellite network, to an operations centre where strategic business decisions can be made


Seven Technologies | Entity website

We are committed to delivering world class products to the global marketplace and serving our international customer base.With our combination of technical expertise and practical experience we occupy a unique place in the market to deliver robust and reliable solutions for handling the complexities of interconnected infrastructure security, asset management and remote surveillance ...


News Article | December 30, 2015
Site: www.reuters.com

Developed in partnership with other companies like Seven Technologies Group, which specializes in security technology and helped train rangers on conservation sites on how best to use Instant Detect devices, ZSL hopes it could help the fight against poaching, as well as the monitoring of endangered and other species. In the last 40 years 95 percent of rhinoceroses have been poached and more than 100,000 African elephants from 2011-2014 have been illegally killed, according to the charity group. Instant Detect is a camera trap system that uses satellite technology to send images from anywhere in the world, according to ZSL Conservation Technology Unit Project Manager, Louise Hartley. "It's a camera that we would deploy in the wild, it has to be quite sturdy and it often uses motion triggers, so it will have a passive infrared sensor to detect heat changes, so as an animal or a person walks past an image will be captured, and it's just a great way to get an insight into the wild that you wouldn't be able to do if you were a person," she said. The satellite node uses a Raspberry Pi computer to send the images via the Iridium satellite network, which is a satellite constellation providing voice and data coverage to satellite phones, pagers and other integrated transceivers. A filter moves across the lens detecting the change from day to night and adjusting the camera accordingly, so it can see in the dark using night vision. According to Hartley, it has two main uses - monitoring and catching poachers. "We have a deployment in Antarctica to monitor penguins, so we're getting images back daily to look at the penguin behavior and also look at environmental change in that area," she said. "We're also using it for anti-poaching purposes to improve security within protected areas. So an alert, an image, would be sent to an operations room and then rangers can then react accordingly to that alert," she added. If an intruder enters a protected area the camera picks that up and sends an alert. It also has magnetic sensors that can pick up cars, guns and even knives, also triggering the alert to local rangers. The Instant Detect box has a camera lens in the middle, surrounded by an LED array used for night-time imagery using infrared flash - "so when it goes off you won't be able to see it, it's not visible to the human eye," said Hartley. "We have here the passive infrared sensor, so that's the motion detector, so it detects heat change, so as a person or a species is walking in it will trigger an image to be taken," she added, "you can also set it to timelapse so you can set an image to be taken every four hours or every five hours for example." The crucial part, though, is how it talks to ZSL's monitors and to local rangers. "You have the antenna attached to the top here, and then you would have a battery pack attached to the bottom here. When an image is taken there's a separate unit called the satellite node, and the images are sent via radio frequency to the satellite node and then the satellite node uses the Iridium Satellite Network to send that image to where you need it," Hartley said. Other anti-poaching technologies have come to the fore recently, including the Real-Time Anti-Poaching Intelligence Device (RAPID) developed by conservation organization Protect with support from the Humane Society International. DNA analysis, acoustic traps, thermal imaging and improving analytics and mapping are all contributing to the fight against poaching as well. ZSL hopes that Instant Detect could be a crucial addition to that growing arsenal, in what remains a battle with high costs. The Kruger Park, South Africa's main tourist draw, is one place on the front-line of the battle against a surge in rhino poaching for the animal's horn to meet demand in countries such as Vietnam, where it is a coveted ingredient in traditional medicine. The poaching of rhinos there rose in 2015, although it was on the decline elsewhere in the country. ZSL has limited ambitions for the time being on the device's usage, although they do eventually want to scale up and roll it out even further. "For the business aspect of Instant Detect, we're really just using it for conservation purposes, so we'll roll it out to two different sites for anti-poaching or for remote monitoring. A lot of that will be through grant funded, but also we may sell additional systems to four conservation uses," Hartley said. "We want to bring in new transmission methods," she added. "So as new connectivity is improving around the world, in addition to satellite, we'd also like to have GSM capabilities in there, so when it is available we can send it by mobile networks, because it is a lot cheaper than satellite." "We also want to look at how we can reduce the cost so it is more scalable and do things like improve image quality, so you get a really, really great image which would support evidence for example in prosecutions," she added. ZSL is also focusing on countries where they have resources and man power to follow up on conservation work.

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