Settore Fitosanitario regionale

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy

Settore Fitosanitario regionale

Sant'Ambrogio di Torino, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale | Gueorguiev B.,National Museum of Natural History
ZooKeys | Year: 2011

Paralovricia gen. n. beroni sp. n., belonging to the new subtribe Lovriciina, is described from two caves in the Western Rhodopes (Bulgaria): Kraypatnata peshtera, near Smilyan Village (Smolyan Municipality) and Snezhanka, near Peshtera Town (Peshtera Municipality). Three currently known genera, Lovricia Pretner, 1979, Neolovricia Lakota, Jalz ̌ic ́ & Moravec, 2009 and Paralovricia gen. n. represent a monophyletic unit supported by important synapomorphies that allows to propose the establishment of the new subtribe Lovriciina, characterized by the following characters: last maxillary palpomeres very long and narrow, basal angles of pronotum without seta, elytra without discal setae, elytral umbilicate series of nine pores in which the main pores are the 2nd, 6th and 9th, apical recurrent striole absent and mesotibial apex expanded outward. Its systematic position within the subfamily Trechinae (sensu Lorenz 2005) is discussed and Lovriciina is placed near Anillina. Key to the genera of the subtribe is proposed. Distribution data and zoogeographical hypotheses are discussed.


Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale | Latella L.,Museo Civico di Storia Naturale
Zootaxa | Year: 2013

Two new species of Anemadus from the Near East are described and illustrated. Anemadus lucarellii sp. nov., from South- Western Anatolia, belongs to the Anemadus pellitus species-group (sensu Giachino & Vailati, 1993) and Anemadus kad-leci sp. nov., from North-Western Syria, belongs to the Anemadus strigosus species-group (sensu Giachino & Vailati, 1993). The description of these new species markedly increases the knowledge of the distribution of this genus in the Near East. Copyright © 2013 Magnolia Press.


Mammola S.,University of Turin | Piano E.,University of Turin | Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale | Isaia M.,University of Turin
International Journal of Speleology | Year: 2015

Hypogean beetles generally live in stable environments, characterized by constant temperature and high relative humidity. Changes in the underground microclimatic conditions generally induce local migrations of the beetles through the hypogean environment in search of suitable microhabitats. We studied the seasonal dynamics and the micro-climatic preference of two Alpine endemic hypogean beetles Sphodropsis ghilianii (Coleoptera, Carabidae) and Dellabeffaella roccae (Coleoptera, Cholevidae) in the hypogean complex of Pugnetto (Graian Alps, Italy). We surveyed the two species for one year, using baited pitfall traps and measuring temperature and humidity along the two main caves. We used logistic regression mixed models (GLMMs) to relate the presence of the two species to several variables, namely microclimate (seasonality, temperature, and humidity), subjacency and cave length. In addition, we tested the attractive power of the bait on the two species. The thermic optimum for S. ghilianii was found to be around 7°C, with an increasing probability of finding the species in the vicinity of the cave entrance during summer, autumn and spring. The species migrates inside the cave in winter, in response to the drop in the mean daily temperature and in the relative humidity occurring in the outer parts of the cave. On the contrary, D. roccae showed a significant preference for the deeper sections of the cave, characterized by an almost constant temperature of 9°C in air saturated with water vapour. Males and females individuals of both species were found to be equally affected by the environmental variables included in the analysis. We also provided information on the life history of the two species and methodological insights about the use of the bait in the traps. © 2015, Societa Speleologica Italiana. All rights reserved.


Isaia M.,University of Turin | Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale | Sapino E.,University of Turin | Casale A.,University of Sassari | Badino G.,University of Turin
Journal for Nature Conservation | Year: 2011

Subterranean ecosystems often harbour unique and specialised biocoenoses of considerable scientific interest and high potential conservation value. In view of the peculiar species assemblage in the abandoned tunnels of a talc mine complex in the north-western Italian Alps (Germanasca Valley, Province of Turin, NW Italy), the aims of the present work were (i) to investigate the subterranean invertebrate fauna, (ii) to assess the impact of tourism activities on the invertebrate fauna, and (iii) to assess the conservation value of the terrestrial invertebrate community and associated habitats. The study was carried out at four sites: one tunnel restored for tourism purposes; two abandoned tunnels; and a wild cave. The results of several statistical analyses, including ANOVA, PCA and CCA, showed that the eutrophic conditions induced by past human activity could improve the quality of the subterranean habitat. On the other hand, a massive intervention for tourism purposes could seriously jeopardise the survival of the most sensitive species. The increased thermic instability and mean temperature had a significant negative effect on the local populations of cave-dwelling arthropods, whose ecological optimum is determined primarily by low thermic instability, cold temperatures and intermediate conditions of eutrophy. On the basis of our results we strongly recommend to avoid thermic isolation of any part of tunnels, as it is the primary factor affecting the most sensitive species. © 2010 Elsevier GmbH.


PubMed | University of Turin and Settore Fitosanitario Regionale
Type: Review | Journal: Die Naturwissenschaften | Year: 2016

The term Milieu Souterrain Superficiel (MSS) has been used since the early 1980s in subterranean biology to categorize an array of different hypogean habitats. In general terms, a MSS habitat represents the underground network of empty air-filled voids and cracks developing within multiple layers of rock fragments. Its origins can be diverse and is generally covered by topsoil. The MSS habitat is often connected both with the deep hypogean domain-caves and deep rock cracks-and the superficial soil horizon. A MSS is usually characterized by peculiar microclimatic conditions, and it can harbor specialized hypogean, endogean, and surface-dwelling species. In light of the many interpretations given by different authors, we reviewed 235 papers regarding the MSS in order to provide a state-of-the-art description of these habitats and facilitate their study. We have briefly described the different types of MSS mentioned in the scientific literature (alluvial, bedrock, colluvial, volcanic, and other types) and synthesized the advances in the study of the physical and ecological factors affecting this habitat-i.e., microclimate, energy flows, animal communities, and trophic interactions. We finally described and reviewed the available sampling methods used to investigate MSS fauna.


PubMed | Crea Consiglio Per La Ricerca In Agricoltura E Lanalisi Delleconomia Agraria Unita Of Ricerca Per Le Produzioni Legnose Fuori Foresta and Settore Fitosanitario Regionale
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Forty species belonging to the subgenus Agraphoderus of Blennidus have been recorded so far from Peru. An annotated checklist is provided with information about their type locality, distribution and habitat. The nomenclature of each species is also provided, together with some notes on their systematic status. Blennidus bombonensis n. sp. from Cerro de Pasco is described; Blennidus pseudangularis nomen novum for Ogmopleura angularis Straneo, 1993 (nec Straneo, 1985) is proposed and the following synonymies are stated: Blennidus pseudangularis Allegro & Giachino, nomen novum = Blennidus rectangulus (Straneo, 1993) syn. nov.; Ogmopleura minor Straneo, 1993 = Blennidus rectangulus (Straneo, 1993) syn. nov. Type specimens of most species are illustrated, as well as male genitalia. Finally, a revised key to all the Agraphoderus species from Peru is provided.


Allegro G.,CREA Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e lAnalisi dellEconomia Agraria | Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale
Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Forty species belonging to the subgenus Agraphoderus of Blennidus have been recorded so far from Peru. An annotated checklist is provided with information about their type locality, distribution and habitat. The nomenclature of each species is also provided, together with some notes on their systematic status. Blennidus bombonensis n. sp. from Cerro de Pasco is described; Blennidus pseudangularis nomen novum for Ogmopleura angularis Straneo, 1993 (nec Straneo, 1985) is proposed and the following synonymies are stated: Blennidus pseudangularis Allegro & Giachino, nomen novum = Blen-nidus rectangulus (Straneo, 1993) syn. nov.; Ogmopleura minor Straneo, 1993 = Blennidus rectangulus (Straneo, 1993) syn. nov. Type specimens of most species are illustrated, as well as male genitalia. Finally, a revised key to all the Agra-phoderus species from Peru is provided. Copyright © 2015 Magnolia Press.


Giachino P.M.,Settore Fitosanitario Regionale | Allegro G.,Italian Agricultural Research Council | Baviera C.,Messina University
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

Two new species of Oxytrechus Jeannel 1927 are described from the páramos of the Ecuadorian Andes in Pichincha province (Ecuador: Northern Sierra): O. osellai n. sp. from Cangahua at 3375 m a.s.l. and O. belloi n. sp. from Paso de la Virgen at 3515 m a.s.l. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press


Four new species of Blennidus subgenus Agraphoderus are described from the Andes of Southern Peru: B. (A.) procerus n. sp., B. (A.) abramalagae n. sp., B. (A.) etontii n. sp. and B. (A.) straneoi n. sp. Together with B. (A.) jelskii (Tschitschérine, 1897), they form a very homogeneous group of probably closely related species (the jelskii group), which is distinguished from other members of the subgenus by the distinctive morphology of the aedeagus. A redescription of B. (A.) jelskii is given based on the lectotype and paralectotype designated by Straneo & Vereshagina (1991), supplementing Tschitschérine's brief original description. The distribution pattern of the species presently included in the jelskii species-group is discussed, emphasizing distinctive traits of stenoendemic species inhabiting restricted geographical areas, and discussing their possible origin by allopatric speciation. © 2011 Museu de Ciències Naturals de Barcelona.


PubMed | Settore Fitosanitario Regionale
Type: | Journal: Zootaxa | Year: 2015

Two new species of Anemadus from the Near East are described and illustrated. Anemadus lucarellii sp. nov., from South-Western Anatolia, belongs to the Anemadus pellitus species-group (sensu Giachino & Vailati, 1993) and Anemadus kadleci sp. nov., from North-Western Syria, belongs to the Anemadus strigosus species-group (sensu Giachino & Vailati, 1993). The description of these new species markedly increases the knowledge of the distribution of this genus in the Near East.

Loading Settore Fitosanitario regionale collaborators
Loading Settore Fitosanitario regionale collaborators