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Gershoff E.T.,University of Texas at Austin | Aber J.L.,New York University | Kotler J.A.,Sesame Workshop
Child Development | Year: 2010

The enduring impact of exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on mental health and sociopolitical attitudes was examined in a sample of 427 adolescents (M = 16.20 years) and their mothers residing in New York City. Direct exposure to the terrorist attack was associated with youth depression symptoms and with mothers' posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. There was no evidence of reciprocal effects of mother exposure on youth or of youth exposure on mothers. Although mothers reported engaging in more emotional processing coping assistance with their children, coping assistance was not associated with youth's symptomatology. Media exposure was found to be a strong predictor of youth's and mothers' sociopolitical attitudes about issues such as prejudice toward immigrants, social mistrust, and current events. © 2010, Copyright the Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2010, Society for Research in Child Development, Inc. Source


Trademark
Sesame Workshop | Date: 2014-05-01

Infant cloth diapers; disposable baby diapers; disposable training pants. Musical recordings, audio recordings, compact discs, multimedia software recorded on CD-ROMs, audio cassettes, video recordings, DVDs, downloadable recordings of television programs and cinematographic film for exhibition, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; downloadable electronic magazines featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; computer game programs, cartridges, cassettes, discs and software; downloadable software in the nature of mobile applications featuring childrens educational and entertainment programs and musical sound and video recordings; downloadable computer game software for mobile game applications; downloadable computer software for use as screensavers and wallpaper; downloadable multimedia content, namely, music, graphics, audio and video recordings featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families, interactive games and downloadable ring tones all for use on computers, cell phones and other mobile devices; computers and computer peripherals, computer peripheral mouse pads; CD players; DVD players; calculators; radios; radios incorporating clocks; walkie-talkies; decorative refrigerator magnets; baby monitors; bicycle helmets; photographic cameras; video cameras; handheld digital electronic devices and software related thereto, hand held computers, tablet computers; mobile digital electronic devices; sunglasses, eyeglasses, and eyeglass cases, all relating to a childrens television series featuring monster characters. Printed materials, namely, books, magazines and newsletters all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; coloring books; comic books; teachers` guides featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; address books; personal organizers; autograph books; baby books; birthday books; diaries; paper book covers; bookends; bookmarks; book plates; printed charts; paperweights; photo albums; photographs; stationery; writing paper; writing tablets; note cards; notebooks; ring binders; notepads; folders; document portfolios; stationery-type portfolios; postcards; greeting cards; pens; pencils; pen stands; pencil cases; pencil sharpeners; envelopes; erasers; ring binder dividers; rubber stamps; stamp pads; drawing rulers; staplers; adhesive tape for stationery purposes; adhesive tape dispensers; chalk; chalkboards, construction paper, crayons, markers, modeling clay, modeling clay sets comprised of clay and plastic sculpting tools sold as a unit, drawing sets comprised of paper and pencils; arts and crafts paint kits; printing sets consisting of decorative stamps and paper, stencils, easels, storage boxes; calendars; posters; stickers; paper door knob hangers; heat transfer paper; self adhesive decorative seals; vinyl non-sticker decals; vinyl coated memo board; crepe paper, paper gift tags; gift wrapping paper; paper cake decorations; paper centerpieces; paper doilies; paper bags; paper identification tags; paper napkins; paper party decorations; paper party hats; paper party invitations; paper place mats; paper tablecloths; shelf paper; facial tissue, toilet paper; paper baby bibs; bank checks; checkbook covers; address labels. Clothing for men, women, children and infants, including shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops, T shirts, pants, loungewear, overalls, jeans, shorts, vests, socks, leggings, sleepwear, infants sleepers, pajamas, nightgowns, robes, dresses, jumpers, skirts, sweaters, underwear, non-disposable cloth training pants, swimwear, playsuits, baby bibs not made of paper, clothing mufflers, clothing scarves, clothing belts, clothing ties, suspenders, headwear, footwear, mittens, gloves, coats, ponchos, snowsuits, smocks, Halloween and masquerade costumes; play costumes for use in role-playing games; all of the foregoing relating to a childrens television series featuring monster characters. Toys, games and playthings, namely, plush toys, dolls, doll clothing and costumes, doll accessories, yo-yos, hobby craft kits comprising painting sets, action skill games, board games, card games, manipulative puzzles, manipulative games, hand held units for playing electronic games, electronic learning toys, toy film cartridges and viewers, squeeze toys, bath toys, beach toys, multiple activity baby toys, infant toys, baby rattles, baby rattles incorporating teething rings, puppets, bean bags, pull toys, ride-on toys, toy vehicles, toy scooters, ice skates, roller skates, sports balls, beach balls, playground balls, toy foam balls, flying discs, jump ropes, kites, wind up toys, balloons, toy building blocks, construction toys, toy banks, toy shovels, toy pails, toys designed to be attached to car seats, cribs and high chairs, toy musical instruments, toy telephones, toy music boxes; toy building structures, toy action figures and accessories therefor, cases for play accessories, toy environments for use with action figures, play sets for action figures, role playing game sets, toy furniture, toy tools; play costume masks; play doll costumes, masquerade games, air mattresses for recreational use, inflatable swimming pools, swimming aids, namely, pool rings, arm floats for recreational use, and swim floats for recreational use; playground sand boxes; tennis racquets; snow sleds for recreational use; snow boards; party favors in the nature of small toys; party favors in the nature of crackers and noisemakers; Easter egg coloring kits; Christmas tree decorations, ornaments, and skirts. Ongoing television program featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; amusement parks; live theatrical performances; providing online information featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing on-line non-downloadable magazines featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing on-line computer games and activities for children, parents and families via the internet, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; entertainment services, namely, providing pod casts and web casts, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing online non-downloadable interactive video games and multimedia computer games.


Trademark
Sesame Workshop | Date: 2014-05-01

Infant cloth diapers; disposable baby diapers; disposable training pants. Musical recordings, audio recordings, compact discs, multimedia software recorded on CD-ROMs, audio cassettes, video recordings, DVDs, downloadable recordings of television programs and cinematographic film for exhibition, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; downloadable electronic magazines featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; computer game programs, cartridges, cassettes, discs and software; downloadable software in the nature of mobile applications featuring childrens educational and entertainment programs and musical sound and video recordings; downloadable computer game software for mobile game applications; downloadable computer software for use as screensavers and wallpaper; downloadable multimedia content, namely, music, graphics, audio and video recordings featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families, interactive games and downloadable ring tones all for use on computers, cell phones and other mobile devices; computers and computer peripherals, computer peripheral mouse pads; CD players; DVD players; calculators; radios; radios incorporating clocks; walkie-talkies; decorative refrigerator magnets; baby monitors; bicycle helmets; photographic cameras; video cameras; handheld digital electronic devices and software related thereto, hand held computers, tablet computers; mobile digital electronic devices; sunglasses, eyeglasses, and eyeglass cases, all relating to a childrens television series featuring monster characters. Printed materials, namely, books, magazines and newsletters all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; coloring books; comic books; teachers` guides featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; address books; personal organizers; autograph books; baby books; birthday books; diaries; paper book covers; bookends; bookmarks; book plates; printed charts; paperweights; photo albums; photographs; stationery; writing paper; writing tablets; note cards; notebooks; ring binders; notepads; folders; document portfolios; stationery-type portfolios; postcards; greeting cards; pens; pencils; pen stands; pencil cases; pencil sharpeners; envelopes; erasers; ring binder dividers; rubber stamps; stamp pads; drawing rulers; staplers; adhesive tape for stationery purposes; adhesive tape dispensers; chalk; chalkboards, construction paper, crayons, markers, modeling clay, modeling clay sets comprised of clay and plastic sculpting tools sold as a unit, drawing sets comprised of paper and pencils; arts and crafts paint kits; printing sets consisting of decorative stamps and paper, stencils, easels, storage boxes; calendars; posters; stickers; paper door knob hangers; heat transfer paper; self adhesive decorative seals; vinyl non-sticker decals; vinyl coated memo board; crepe paper, paper gift tags; gift wrapping paper; paper cake decorations; paper centerpieces; paper doilies; paper bags; paper identification tags; paper napkins; paper party decorations; paper party hats; paper party invitations; paper place mats; paper tablecloths; shelf paper; facial tissue, toilet paper; paper baby bibs; bank checks; checkbook covers; address labels. Clothing for men, women, children and infants, including shirts, sweatshirts, tank tops, T shirts, pants, loungewear, overalls, jeans, shorts, vests, socks, leggings, sleepwear, infants sleepers, pajamas, nightgowns, robes, dresses, jumpers, skirts, sweaters, underwear, non-disposable cloth training pants, swimwear, playsuits, baby bibs not made of paper, clothing mufflers, clothing scarves, clothing belts, clothing ties, suspenders, headwear, footwear, mittens, gloves, coats, ponchos, snowsuits, smocks, Halloween and masquerade costumes; play costumes for use in role-playing games; all of the foregoing relating to a childrens television series featuring monster characters. Toys, games and playthings, namely, plush toys, dolls, doll clothing and costumes, doll accessories, yo-yos, hobby craft kits comprising painting sets, action skill games, board games, card games, manipulative puzzles, manipulative games, hand held units for playing electronic games, electronic learning toys, toy film cartridges and viewers, squeeze toys, bath toys, beach toys, multiple activity baby toys, infant toys, baby rattles, baby rattles incorporating teething rings, puppets, bean bags, pull toys, ride-on toys, toy vehicles, toy scooters, ice skates, roller skates, sports balls, beach balls, playground balls, toy foam balls, flying discs, jump ropes, kites, wind up toys, balloons, toy building blocks, construction toys, toy banks, toy shovels, toy pails, toys designed to be attached to car seats, cribs and high chairs, toy musical instruments, toy telephones, toy music boxes; toy building structures, toy action figures and accessories therefor, cases for play accessories, toy environments for use with action figures, play sets for action figures, role playing game sets, toy furniture, toy tools; play costume masks; play doll costumes, masquerade games, air mattresses for recreational use, inflatable swimming pools, swimming aids, namely, pool rings, arm floats for recreational use, and swim floats for recreational use; playground sand boxes; tennis racquets; snow sleds for recreational use; snow boards; party favors in the nature of small toys; party favors in the nature of crackers and noisemakers; Easter egg coloring kits; Christmas tree decorations, ornaments, and skirts. Ongoing television program featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; amusement parks; live theatrical performances; providing online information featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing on-line non-downloadable magazines featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing on-line computer games and activities for children, parents and families via the internet, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; entertainment services, namely, providing pod casts and web casts, all featuring educational themes and entertainment directed to children, parents and families; providing online non-downloadable interactive video games and multimedia computer games.


News Article | December 14, 2015
Site: http://www.fastcompany.com

Tiggly, a company that makes tablet learning games for preschoolers, has what every publisher wants: an app near the top of the App Store charts. The app, called Sesame Street Alphabet Kitchen, is an early-literacy tool that lets kids build words with Cookie Monster in the form of—what else?—cookies. It’s the product of a strategic partnership with Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit organization behind the popular kids' show. Within one week of launch in late November, Alphabet Kitchen was the No. 1 iPad app in both the Kids and Education categories, and ranked fourth overall in the iPad App Store. "We were very excited about the ranking," says Azadeh Jamalian, Tiggly’s cofounder and chief learning officer. And rightfully so. With more than 40,000 new apps released into the app store each month, landing one of those coveted top spots is no accident. For Tiggly, it was the result of a lot of hard work and strategizing. Before releasing a new app into the world, smart publishers test the waters first with a soft launch to a small audience. "They see where the people are dropping off, not having fun, or don’t engage well in the first 30 minutes and leave the app, then they tweak it," says Fabien-Pierre Nicolas, VP of marketing and communications at mobile app analytics company App Annie. This soft launch can last anywhere from one to six months. "You really want this early user experience to be the best user experience possible," Nicolas says. "That takes time." Tiggly did a version of this with Alphabet Kitchen. The company has the benefit of owning other apps already in the App Store, which it can use for cross-promoting new products. "There’s a ‘more apps’ button to see other apps that are coming from Tiggly," Jamalian says. "Before we launch an app, we come up with different icons for that app and see how popular each of those icons are, based on the number of clicks they get." According to App Annie, "just like a physical store’s sign or front window, your icon needs to explain your app’s core value and incentivize users to tap." By looking at the app’s title and icon, users should be able to discern what they’ll get when they click. For example, Tiggly knew it wanted Cookie Monster in the logo. The blue furry cookie fanatic is one of the show’s most popular muppets, and using his face was a quick and clear way to signal to parents that the app came with Sesame Street’s stamp of approval. "Today's parents have grown up with Sesame Street characters themselves . . . which means parents want their kids to also play and learn with Sesame," Jamalian says. They gave the character a chef's hat to signal that kids would be baking with the character. Apple has an editorial team dedicated specifically to vetting new apps. These gatekeepers have high standards—both Apple and Google have entire booklets full of requirements new apps should meet if they want to be approved, or more importantly, promoted as a "featured" app. Only a handful of apps are "featured" each week, but the payoff can be enormous. "The big banner features are so important," says Nicolas. "That will get you over a million installs, and if I had to put a price tag on a million installs, it is $2 million in value. A lot of seed rounds that startups are raising are $1.5 million, so you're talking about the equivalent of a large seed round from Apple or Google, handed to you." One of the biggest qualities Apple looks for when considering which apps to feature is novelty. The app store has more than 80,000 education apps already, so Tiggly knew it had to offer something others didn’t. "That comes with a lot of research, and knowing where the areas for improvement are," Jamalian says. "What type of content is already saturated? That initial research you have to do on your own, and it helps with your relationship with Apple because they know you’re serious." Part of Tiggly’s mission is to create educational apps that have a physical play element to them, so what makes the Alphabet Kitchen app different is its compatibility with smart Tiggly toys—physical letters kids can stamp on the iPad screen like cookie cutters to make words. "We bring the best of physical play and digital together to create a new play experience for children that you can’t necessarily replicate with toys or apps alone," Jamalian says. One effective way to get attention for a new app is by winning awards and getting excellent reviews, but you have to know which competitions to enter and what editors are looking for. "For example, there’s a Children’s Technology Review (CTR) Editor’s Choice Award, and one of the editors is a well-known guy in the app industry," Jamalian says. "It’s important to know what type of design concentration he has in mind when evaluating your app." Tiggly got a glowing review from the CTR, and has received two other notable awards since launching Alphabet Kitchen. According to Nicolas at App Annie, November and December are traditionally the worst months for releasing a new app into the marketplace. "Major advertisers and retailers, the big guys, spend a massive amount of money on mobile around Christmas and Thanksgiving, which prevents you from doing efficient acquisition," says Nicolas. Newbies have a better shot in January, when lots of people are breaking in new phones and are more likely to be on the hunt for new apps to try. Of course, this means Tiggly’s Alphabet Kitchen is a bit of an anomaly with its November success story, and no doubt Sesame Street’s reputation had a lot to do with that. "Sesame Workshop is legendary in children's media and education," Jamalian says. "[Parents] trust that the time their kids spend with Sesame is educational, playful, and full of laughter."


News Article
Site: http://techcrunch.com

Sesame Workshop, the organization that brought to life the beloved Sesame Street and countless other programs, has announced a new venture arm to invest in apps that help children develop. Working jointly with venture capital firm Collaborative Fund (which has funded companies like Lyft and AltSchool), Sesame Workshop has formed a new organization called Collab+Sesame. Currently, Collab+Sesame has access to a $10 million fund, which is intended to be used for Sesame Workshop’s core mission to “[help] kids grow smarter, stronger and kinder.” This change comes only a few months after the announcement of Sesame Workshop’s plan to partner with HBO for five years, giving the organization better funding to continue producing top-tier children’s programming. After 45 years of consistent quality, it’s clear that Sesame Workshop wants to evolve with the times and find new outlets to help children develop. The funding will be available in increments of up to $1 million, for a minimum of 10 startups backed by the Collab+Sesame venture. In addition to receiving funding, selected entrepreneurs will be paired with mentors from Sesame Workshop’s executive team. These partnerships will help the apps develop in meaningful directions, and will grant entrepreneurs access to Sesame Street characters and branding — a possibly powerful marketing and user-acceptance tool. However, it isn’t mandatory for entrepreneurs to use Sesame Street characters; they are merely available as an additional resource. Like with any venture capital partnership, there are some advantages and disadvantages to this model. For starters, the mentors from Sesame Workshop have nearly five decades of experience working with children and families, lending massive expertise to app development. The possible addition of Sesame Street characters and branding is another potentially lucrative advantage for prospective entrepreneurs. However, there may be some disadvantages that arise from the natural conflict of interest between a non-profit organization and a for-profit app. Currently, there aren’t many specific requirements for entrepreneurs or apps interested in a chance at the funding. Apps must be in some kind of developmental phase, and must serve a core function of improving childhood development in one of six areas: If your app fits one of these categories, you can consider yourself a potential applicant for this program. Working with Sesame Workshop could give your app (and brand) an enormous advantage and, together, you could do a lot of good for the children of the world. If you or your company is interested in applying for the program, read more details and apply here.

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