San Francisco, CA, United States
San Francisco, CA, United States

Servio is a San Francisco technology company that provides enterprise content services. It was founded by Alex Edelstein and Jordan Ritter in 2009, and originally called CloudCrowd. The CloudCrowd brand continues to be used by the company as its online workspace. and uses crowdsourcing concepts. Wikipedia.


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Agarwal A.K.,University of Texas at Dallas | Xing C.,University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | Demartino G.N.,University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | Mizrachi D.,University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center | And 5 more authors.
American Journal of Human Genetics | Year: 2010

We performed homozygosity mapping in two recently reported pedigrees from Portugal and Mexico with an autosomal-recessive autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by joint contractures, muscle atrophy, microcytic anemia, and panniculitis-induced lipodystrophy (JMP). This revealed only one homozygous region spanning 2.4 Mb (5818 SNPs) on chromosome 6p21 shared by all three affected individuals from both families. We directly sequenced genes involved in immune response located in this critical region, excluding the HLA complex genes. We found a homozygous missense mutation c.224C>T (p.Thr75Met) in the proteasome subunit, beta-type, 8 (PSMB8) gene in affected patients from both pedigrees. The mutation segregated in an autosomal-recessive fashion and was not detected in 275 unrelated ethnically matched healthy subjects. PSMB8 encodes a catalytic subunit of the 20S immunoproteasomes called β5i. Immunoproteasome-mediated proteolysis generates immunogenic epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Threonine at position 75 is highly conserved and its substitution with methionine disrupts the tertiary structure of PSMB8. As compared to normal lymphoblasts, those from an affected patient showed significantly reduced chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity mediated by immunoproteasomes. We conclude that mutations in PSMB8 cause JMP syndrome, most probably by affecting MHC class I antigen processing. © 2010 by The American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.


Salmoria G.V.,Federal University of Santa Catarina | Paggi R.A.,Federal University of Santa Catarina | Lago A.,Federal University of Santa Catarina | Beal V.E.,Servio
Polymer Testing | Year: 2011

To determine the potential properties of commercial polyamide 12 (PA12) used in the selective laser sintering (SLS) process, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed in the polyamide powder by mechanical mixing to prepare a composite (PA/MWCNTs). Specimens of PA12 and PA/MWCNTs were manufactured by the SLS process. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic mechanical analysis were used to assess the structural and mechanical properties of the materials. Stress-strain tests showed higher values for flexural modulus and ultimate strength for the composite when compared to PA12 specimens. Changes in the viscoelastic properties suggest intermolecular interaction between the PA12 and MWCNTs. Fatigue tests show an improvement in the composite strength with the addition of MWCNTs, retarding the creep failure mechanism. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Patent
Servio | Date: 2011-09-21

Using a distributed set of unsupervised workers to produce a work product is disclosed. In some embodiments, a work product is received. A review task to review the work product is provided to a reviewing worker included in the set of unsupervised workers. A result of the review task is received. A determination is made, based at least in part on the review result, whether the work product satisfies an acceptance criteria.


Patent
Servio | Date: 2011-09-21

A reputation system to evaluate work is disclosed. Answer data for each of one or more unsupervised workers is received. The answer data includes one or more answers each representing a judgment by the worker that reflects on the quality of a given work product. The reputation system determines programmatically, based at least in part on a reputation data of an owner of the work product, the answer data, and a respective reputation data of the respective unsupervised workers, which answers are correct.


News Article | August 17, 2011
Site: techcrunch.com

Adam Penenberg aka The Man Who Took Down Stephen Glass decided to write about Serv.io, a crowdsourcing content farm that allows publishers to request articles for quick publication. They call it “content engineering,” which does not bode well for my job since I have a MA and not an MSc. The resulting article, written with tongue firmly in cheek is an excellent example of the dangers of “content engineering.” Unlike, say, a banking program, content is difficult to engineer. If you’re thorough, writing about a company is a hard slog and if you’re not thorough you need to at least be vibrant. Penenberg’s resulting crowdsourced pean to Servio was, in fact, neither. Basic facts were accurate; anything that required interpretation, however, was ripe for abuse. They simply avoided the questions I submitted that asked them to describe the company’s greatest weaknesses and to critique its competitors, and I never did find out what the company’s revenues were. Anything having to do with the company’s cofounders Jordan Ritter and Alex Edelstein was painfully fawning. They were described as “hip, young businessmen” with “boyish good looks,” so much so that “it is not difficult to imagine how they have become so successful in the hip world of Internet business.” Can ink-stained wretches like Penenberg (and, presumably, me) be replaced with content engineers? Absolutely. Most stories are press releases rehashed and, barring the occasional scoop/investigative piece, it has been that way since the broadsheets. There’s no money in shaking the crown of power from a lowly perch. There is money in feeding novel info to a ravenous, neophilic audience. Penenberg’s article was a goof, sure, but it points out that item we read online – even this one – could be outsourced or crowdsourced. Does it matter? Not particularly, but it is nice to know that there is a real person behind Oz’s curtain… at least some of the time.


News Article | October 22, 2012
Site: venturebeat.com

Crowdsource, a company that crowdfunds labor-intensive tasks like content creation and data-crunching, has raised $12.5 million in a round led by Highland Capital Partners. “We believe that we’re onto a completely new way to get work done at scale,” said CEO and cofounder Stephanie Leffler, in a phone interview with VentureBeat. The St Louis-based startup’s typical workers are students, housewives, and people with flexible hours. They receive a decent hourly wage (usually between $15 and $30), cash bonuses, and opportunities for higher-paid tasks. Almost all of Crowdsource’s workers are making minimum wage. With a focus on content, Crowdsource is carving out a niche in the market. Websites that offer similar services are Crowdflower, which is popular with e-commerce companies like eBay, and Servio. The company is showing early signs of traction. Since it launched in June 2011, the startup has signed on 500,000 workers, who have completed over 25 million tasks. Ninety percent of its workers live in the United States and 65 percent have a bachelor’s degrees or higher. With the job market still in recovery, there is certainly a market opportunity for semi-skilled labor. “People can do this kind of work as a full-time job,” said Leffler. The founders have hit on a sweet spot by targeting e-commerce sites that need someone to write a blurb to describe a new line of jeans, or update their FAQ. For customers, the process is simple: a site administrator can send a few bullet points to Crowdsource, this will be turned around by a worker in a matter of hours, and the content will be automatically updated (or they can choose to vet the content first). Crowdsource will use the funds to invest in their product, hire more workers, and augment their sales and marketing efforts. Corey Mulloy, general partner at Highland Capital Partners, has joined CrowdSource’s Board of Directors.


News Article | May 26, 2011
Site: www.techworld.com

Microsoft's original Windows Home Server was both crude and groundbreaking. When it debuted, it had limited hardware support, no 64-bit version and weak built-in capabilities beyond file and app storage. On the other hand, it offered robust backup, reasonable security and drive extender, a feature that simplified the tasks of adding and pooling hard drives. Because the original WHS was built on an older server platform, an update was inevitable. Windows Home Server 2011 has now arrived, and with it a bevy of new features, with one key feature of the older version removed. Let's start by looking at why WHS 2011 is a good fit for your home server needs. Windows Home Server 2011 is 64-bit only, but it's a welcome upgrade from 32-bit. Using 64-bit addressing lets you add more than 4GB of RAM. With the original WHS, having a lot of RAM wasn't particularly useful. In fact, some retail WHS boxes shipped with as little as 512MB of RAM and 1GB was the norm. That first Home Server wasn't very suitable for running apps remotely. Eventually, interesting plugins became available, like Servio which enabled WHS to be a better media server. Windows Home Server 2011 has robust media transcoding and streaming capabilities and it supports a wide range of codecs: AAC, AVCHD, DivX, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, WMV and more. It's now a DLNA 1.5-compliant server, meaning that DLNA-capable client devices can connect to a WHS system set up as a media server. As more HDTVs, A/V receivers and other similar home electronic devices ship with built-in DLNA client capability, combining a robust media server and a robust PC server in one box becomes increasingly useful. The original WHS didn't have this capability built-in, so various media server plugins were among the most popular WHS plugins available. But those aren't needed any longer (though some may have additional features beyond those in WHS 2011.) You can add a WHS 2011 box to your HomeGroup, which makes sharing files and printers much easier. The only drawback is that there's setting up shares in this way results in a little granularity. You can have read access, full access or no access. Logging in to the first release of WHS was something of a chore. You could make things easier by using the same characters for your system login and for your account login on the server, and then enabling auto-logon on your PC. But setting up that arrangement on multiple PCs was tedious and created a security risk. WHS 2011 uses an external application, the Dashboard, to separate PC logins from Windows Home Server logins. This allows you to have no login on your desktop PC while maintaining secure access to the server. Managing the first WHS wasn't especially difficult, but you always had to work through a single, modal screen. With 2011, you get full support for windows on your desktop connected remotely. I ran Windows Update on the server from my desktop PC, and it looked just as it would have if I were running Windows Update on my local PC. If you're comfortably using the current version of Windows Home Server, is upgrading to the new version worth the inevitable pain of adjustment? The answer depends on several things: Our assumption here is that you've either built your own WHS box or are a current user of a retail WHS system. The one huge feature that Microsoft dropped from WHS 2011 is Drive Extender. That decision has generated reams of complaints from heavy WHS version 1 users. Drive Extender pooled multiple hard drives into a single large volume. It wasn't RAID, there was no hardware redundancy and no improvement in performance. Essentially it was just a way to minimise the hassle of adding hard drives, which didn't have to be the same size, and of managing multiple disk volumes. But it made building huge volumes easy and if you recorded a lot of media, that could be a big deal. Though Drive Extender didn't create hardware redundancy as such (nor RAID 1 for example), you could specify duplication for shared folders, and the software would replicate folders on separate drives. That capability simplified the job of adding external drives and configuring them as part of the system. So if you're wedded to Drive Extender, you might not want to migrate to WHS 2011. The good news is that third parties are stepping into the fray. The site wegotserved.com reports that at least three third party drive extender drivers will be available for WHS 2011. If you've been using WHS 1, and you've fully configured it with plugins for serving up media, home power management and other features, you may be in no hurry to migrate. That's because upgrades to WHS 2011 from the original aren't simple. There is no clean upgrade path from WHS 1 to WHS 2011, because the first version of WHS is a 32-bit OS while WHS 2011 is 64-bit. Upgrading entails performing a clean install of the OS onto the system. This procedure is a little tricky with existing hardware. A number of retail WHS systems were built around Intel Atom CPUs, and many of them didn't support 64-bit addressing, which means that they can never be upgraded to WHS 2011. The program requires 64-bit support in the CPU. If you have a 64-bit-capable CPU, you'll have to back up all your data, then install WHS 2011, and then restore the backed up data. It's time consuming and tedious if you have a lot invested in your current installation. Now that we understand some of the pros and cons, let's walk through a WHS 2011 installation. This is not an upgrade, but a new install. I've got an existing WHS version 1 box, that I'll eventually phase out, but this makes upgrading to the new system somewhat easier, since I can skip the backup step.


News Article | March 7, 2013
Site: www.xconomy.com

Servio is the leading provider of content marketing services, delivering web-optimized content and data services rapidly and at scale for the ecommerce, publishing and Big Data sectors.


News Article | June 4, 2013
Site: thenextweb.com

Scripted.com, a marketplace for freelance writers, announced today that it has raised $4.5 million in Series A funding to help accelerate its growth. The new investment comes from firms led by Crosslink Capital and Redpoint Ventures. Started in May 2011 by Sunil Rajaraman and Ryan Buckley, Scripted originally was a subsidiary of Scripped.com, a screenwriting software company. By November of that year, it officially changed its name to Scripted. To date, it has more than 80,000 writers that have been vetted in a specific area of expertise and all are based in the US. Companies that are looking for copywriters for either websites or social media posts can visit Scripted’s website and hire someone to write a blog post, Tweet, status update, or any other digital copy piece. Prices start at $2.00 for a Tweet and goes up to as high as $299 for a white paper. Scripted says that it now has more than 1,000 customers using the service, including Verisign, Intuit, and Levi’s. Along with Crosslink and Redpoint, the company’s Series A round included participation from James Currier and Stan Chudnovsky from Ooga Labs, BranchOut CEO Rick Marini, Bebo co-founder Michael Birch, Military.com co-founder Chris Miichel, and angel investor Paige Craig. “Content marketing is a massive opportunity, and our growth is evidence that the single biggest pain point for marketers is content creation. Scripted wanted to put together the strongest investment contingent possible heading into the next phase of the company,” says Rajaraman. Scripted isn’t the only game in town, as while it has an impressive array of customers and writers, it still needs to accelerate growth if it’s going to remain competitive against the likes of Contently and Servio. The company has now raised $5.5 million in venture funding.

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