Servico de Pediatria

Lisbon, Portugal

Servico de Pediatria

Lisbon, Portugal

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Borges-Costa J.,Institute Higiene e Medicina Tropical | Borges-Costa J.,Hospital Of Santa Maria | Matos C.,Servico de Pediatria | Pereira F.,Institute Higiene e Medicina Tropical
Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology | Year: 2012

Background Pregnant adolescents have a high incidence of sexually transmitted infections and higher risk of adverse birth outcome. Objectives To assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in pregnant adolescents and the associations between these infections and adverse birth outcome. Methods A prospective study with a face-to-face interview to pregnant adolescents was followed by first-void urine and cervical swabs collection for polymerase chain reaction testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. After child delivery, clinical files were also reviewed for serological and microbiological results for other infections and data concerning maternal-foetal morbidity. A 5% level of significance was used. Results The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 204 pregnant adolescents, and the prevalence of C. trachomatis was 11.8% and of N. gonorrhoeae was 4.9%, with the majority being asymptomatic. No antibodies for syphilis or human immunodeficiency virus were found. Maternal morbidity occurred in 3.4%, prematurity was observed in 11.8% of the newborns and low birth weight in 9.8%. Statistically significant associations were observed between maternal morbidity and the presence of gonorrhoea, younger adolescents and severe prematurity and between infection with C. trachomatis and/or N. gonorrhoea and low birth weight. Conclusions Sexually transmitted infections are frequently asymptomatic and cause maternal-foetal morbidity. The opportunity that pregnancy offers for screening and counselling should not therefore be missed, especially in adolescents. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.


Freitas J.,Servico de Pediatria | De Sousa S.G.,Servico de Pediatria | Miguel C.,Servico de Pediatria | Fonseca P.,Servico de Pediatria
Revista Portuguesa de Pneumologia | Year: 2010

Pertussis, or whooping cough, is a highly infectious respiratory disease, endemic all over the world, caused by bacteria Bordetella pertussis. The authors describe the case of a 36 day old infant, brought to the emergency room due to respiratory distress and cyanosing cough, admitted with suspected pertussis infection complicated by bacterial pneumonia, having begun large spectrum antibiotics. Labs showed hyperleukocytosis and thrombocytosis. She was transferred to an Intensive Care Unit because of a worsened state, dying 20 hours after admission with pulmonary hypertension and haemorrhage. Pertussis was diagnosed by PCR. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the number of cases of pertussis. Adolescents and adults have become an under-recognized but significant source of infection, particularly to small unvaccinated infants. The authors underline the importance of recognizing pertussis, so that even in its atypical presentation, one can suspect, treat, report and prevent a disease that is not, and is not expected to be, eradicated any time soon. New vaccination strategies are necessary, to avoid this disease, which can be fatal to the most vulnerable.

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