Service dietetique

Limoges, France

Service dietetique

Limoges, France

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Pradignac A.,Unite de Nutrition Therapeutique | Petitdemange A.M.,Hopitaux Universitaires Of Strasbourg | Sery V.,Service Dietetique | Hubsch A.,Service Dietetique | And 2 more authors.
e-SPEN | Year: 2011

Background and aim: Nutritional practices are still insufficient in daily practice due to a lack of understanding or interest in nutritional issues. The aim of this study was to assess whether a nutritional education program for the nursing staff could improve hospitalized patients' nutritional diagnosis and management. Methods: Each year since 2005, members of our hospital's nursing staff received training in nutritional diagnosis and management. Since 2006, nutritional targets aimed at facilitating the detection of nutritional disorders in patients have been used. The effects of this approach on nutritional practices were assessed on an annual basis using targeted external audit. Results: The prescence of the nutrition referents led to a significant improvement in the patients' nutritional assessment and management. These effects were enhanced by using nutritional targets, and the combination of these two parameters resulted in the most significant improvements. Conclusions: A regular training program on nutritional problems designed for nursing staff along with the use of nutritional targets allows for significantly improved nutritional practices for hospitalized patients. © 2011 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.


De Rouvray C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.-C.,Limoges University Hospital Center | Desport J.-C.,University of Monastir | Boutet A.,Service dietetique | And 4 more authors.
Nutrition Clinique et Metabolisme | Year: 2011

Maple syrup disease (MSD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by a decreased activity of branched-chain-ketoacid dehydrogenase, the second enzyme in the pathway of degradation of branched-chain aminoacids (leucine, isoleucine and valine). The three main clinical forms described are: classical form, at the neonatal period, marked by a severe neurological toxicity, subacute form appearing later and thiamine sensitive form. In every case, diagnosis is based on an increase of leucine, isoleucine and valine in blood and urines, with an associated presence of alloisoleucine. Diagnosis is confirmed by molecular analysis of corresponding genes. In several situations of protein catabolism, episodes of intoxication can occur. Emergency treatment for neonates and acutely sick children or adults uses hypoenergetic artificial nutrition (parenteral or enteral nutrition) without aminoacids and consequently involving only glucido-lipidic nutriments. Forty-eight hours later, proteins are progressively reintroduced. Natremia must be controlled, and a supplementation with isoleucine et valine is mandatory. Hemodialysis or hemofiltration can be necessary. Chronic treatment needs a strictly limited diet concerning branched-chain aminoacids. Natural proteins are limited as well as fruits and vegetables intakes. Lipids and sweetened food are permitted ad libitum. Food is supplemented by hyprotidic produces available in some hospital pharmacies. Oncoming of deficiencies is prevented by suplementations in minerals, vitamins, trace-elements, n-3 fatty acids and non-essential aminoacids. Follow-up is performed for children by a pediatrist and by an informed practitioner for adults. Psychomotricity and growth of children must be as normal as possible. All along the life, a metabolic equilibrium is needed and nutritional assessments are recommended at least once a year. Blood leucine level is regularly measured. A diagnosis before birth is possible when MSD has been identified in a member of the family. Pregnancy must be carefully prepared and followed. © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS.

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