Service dEndocrinologie Diabete Nutrition

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

Service dEndocrinologie Diabete Nutrition

Sainte-Foy-lès-Lyon, France

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Lablanche S.,Joseph Fourier University | Borot S.,Center Hospitalier University Jean Minjoz | Wojtusciszyn A.,Center Hospitalier Of Montpellier | Bayle F.,Joseph Fourier University | And 13 more authors.
Diabetes Care | Year: 2015

OBJECTIVE To describe the 5-year outcomes of islet transplantation within the Swiss-French GRAGIL Network. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Retrospective analysis of all subjects enrolled in the GRAGIL-1c and GRAGIL-2 islet transplantation trials. Parameters related to metabolic control, graft function, and safety outcomes were studied. RESULTS Forty-four patients received islet transplantation (islet transplantation alone [ITA] 24 patients [54.5%], islet after kidney [IAK] transplantation 20 patients [45.5%]) between September 2003 and April 2010. Recipients received a total islet mass of 9,715.75 ± 3,444.40 IEQ/kg. Thirty-four patients completed a 5-year follow-up, and 10 patients completed a 4-year follow-up. At 1, 4, and 5 years after islet transplantation, respectively, 83%, 67%, and 58% of the ITA recipients and 80%, 70%, and 60% of the IAK transplant recipients reached HbA1c under 7% (53mmol/mol) and were free of severe hypoglycemia, while none of the ITA recipients and only 10% of the IAK transplant recipients met this composite criterion at the preinfusion stage. Thirty-three of 44 patients (75%) experienced insulin independence during the entire follow-up period, with a median duration of insulin independence of 19.25 months (interquartile range 2-58). Twenty-nine of 44 recipients (66%) exhibited at least one adverse event; 18 of 55 adverse events (33%) were possibly related to immunosuppression; and complications related to the islet infusion (n = 84) occurred in 10 recipients (11.9%). CONCLUSIONS In a large cohortwith a 5-year follow-up and in amulticenter network setting, islet transplantation was safe and efficient in restoring good and lasting glycemic control and preventing severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes. ©2015 by the American Diabetes Association.


Reznik Y.,Caen University Hospital Center | Bertherat J.,Service des maladies endocriniennes et metaboliques | Borson-Chazot F.,University of Lyon | Borson-Chazot F.,French Institute of Health and Medical Research | And 7 more authors.
Diabetes and Metabolism | Year: 2013

Cushing's disease causes considerable morbidity and mortality, including cardiovascular, metabolic, respiratory and psychiatric complications, bone demineralization and increased susceptibility to infections. Metabolic complications include a high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance, fasting hyperglycaemia and diabetes. Although pituitary surgery is the gold-standard treatment, other treatment strategies such as radiotherapy and medical therapy to reduce cortisol synthesis may be proposed in the event of recurrence or failure, or when surgery is not an option. Bilateral adrenalectomy can also be considered. One of the medical treatments used in Cushing's disease is the somatostatin analogue pasireotide, which acts on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion by the pituitary. Its efficacy in reducing urinary free cortisol, plasma cortisol and ACTH, and in improving the clinical signs of the disease has been demonstrated. Its observed adverse effects are similar to the known effects of first-generation somatostatin analogues, although disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism are more frequent and more severe with pasireotide. The aim of the present review was to summarize the epidemiology and pathophysiology of the disturbances of glucose metabolism that arise in Cushing's disease, and to propose recommendations for detecting and monitoring glucose abnormalities and for managing pasireotide-induced hyperglycaemia. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS.

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