Service de Neurologie Infantile

Sfax, Tunisia

Service de Neurologie Infantile

Sfax, Tunisia
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Jdila M.B.,University of Sfax | Issa A.B.,University of Sfax | Khabou B.,University of Sfax | Rhouma B.B.,University of Sfax | And 4 more authors.
Clinica Chimica Acta | Year: 2017

Introduction West syndrome is a rare epileptic encephalopathy of early infancy, characterized by epileptic spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and psychomotor retardation beginning in the first year of life. Methods The present study reports the clinical, molecular and bioinformatic investigation in the three studied West patients. Results The results revealed a complex genotype with more than one mutation in each patient including the known mutations c.1910C > G (P2, P3); c.2372A > C in P3 and c.2395C > G in P1 and novel variants including c.616 G > A, shared by the three patients P1, P2 and P3; c.1403G > C shared by P2 and P3 and c.2288A > G in patient P1. Conclusions All the mutations were at somatic mosaic state and were de novo in the patients except ones (c.2372A > C). To our knowledge; the somatic mosaic state is described for the first time in patients with West syndrome. Five identified mutations were located in the C-terminal domain of the protein, while the novel mutation (c.616 G > A) was in the catalytic domain. Bioinformatic tools predicted that this latter is the most pathogenic substitution affecting 3D protein structure and the secondary mRNA structure. Complex genotype composed of different combinations of mutations in each patient seems to be related to the phenotype variability. © 2017


Cheillan D.,Groupement Hospitalier Est | Briand G.,Lille 2 University of Health and Law | Salomons G.S.,VU University Amsterdam | Cuisset J.-M.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | And 23 more authors.
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases | Year: 2012

A population of patients with unexplained neurological symptoms from six major French university hospitals was screened over a 28-month period for primary creatine disorder (PCD). Urine guanidinoacetate (GAA) and creatine:creatinine ratios were measured in a cohort of 6,353 subjects to identify PCD patients and compile their clinical, §ssup§1§ esup§H-MRS, biochemical and molecular data. Six GAMT [N- guanidinoacetatemethyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.2)] and 10 X-linked creatine transporter (SLC6A8) but no AGAT (GATM) [L-arginine/glycine amidinotransferase (EC 2.1.4.1)] deficient patients were identified in this manner. Three additional affected sibs were further identified after familial inquiry (1 brother with GAMT deficiency and 2 brothers with SLC6A8 deficiency in two different families). The prevalence of PCD in this population was 0.25% (0.09% and 0.16% for GAMT and SLC6A8 deficiencies, respectively). Seven new PCD-causing mutations were discovered (2 nonsense [c.577C > T and c.289C > T] and 1 splicing [c.391 + 15G > T] mutations for the GAMT gene and, 2 missense [c.1208C > A and c.926C > A], 1 frameshift [c.930delG] and 1 splicing [c.1393-1G > A] mutations for the SLC6A8 gene). No hot spot mutations were observed in these genes, as all the mutations were distributed throughout the entire gene sequences and were essentially patient/family specific. Approximately one fifth of the mutations of SLC6A8, but not GAMT, were attributed to neo-mutation, germinal or somatic mosaicism events. The only SLC6A8-deficient female patient in our series presented with the severe phenotype usually characterizing affected male patients, an observation in agreement with recent evidence that is in support of the fact that this X-linked disorder might be more frequent than expected in the female population with intellectual disability. © 2012 Cheillan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Fendri-Kriaa N.,University of Sfax | Hsairi I.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Ellouze E.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Mkaouar-Rebai E.,University of Sfax | And 2 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2011

Rett syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder caused frequently by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). Rett patients present an apparently normal psychomotor development during the first 6-18 months of life. Thereafter, they show a short period of developmental stagnation followed by a rapid regression in language and motor development. The aim of this study was to perform a mutational analysis of the MECP2 gene in a classical Rett patient by sequencing the corresponding gene and modeling the found variants. The results showed the presence of a double-mutation: a new and de novo mutation c.535C > T (p.P179S) and the common c.763C > T (p.R255X) transition of the MECP2 gene. The p.P179S mutation was located in a conserved amino acid in CRIR domain (corepressor interacting region). Modeling results showed that the P179S transition could change local electrostatic properties by adding a negative charge due to serine hydroxyl group of this region of MeCP2 which may affect the function and stability of the protein. The p.R255X mutation is located in TRD-NLS domain (transcription repression domain-nuclear localization signal) of MeCP2 protein. © 2011.


Mkaouar-Rebai E.,University of Sfax | Fendri-Kriaa N.,University of Sfax | Louhichi N.,University of Sfax | Tlili A.,University of Sfax | And 3 more authors.
Bioscience Reports | Year: 2010

Sensorineural hearing loss has been described in association with different mitochondrial multisystemic syndromes, often characterized by an important neuromuscular involvement. Until now, mutations in mitochondrial DNA, especially in the 12S rRNA, the tRNASer(UCN) and the tRNALeu(UUR) genes, were implicated in syndromic or non-syndromic hearing loss either as a primary cause or as predisposing factors. In the present study, we performed a whole mitochondrial genome screening in two unrelated Tunisian families with inherited hearing loss. Results showed the presence of a novel mutation in the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in the two probands of these two families who belong to two different haplogroups: L3 and H6a1. The m.735A>G mutation affects a conserved nucleotide of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene in primates and other species and had a conservation index of 78.5% (11/14). We also detected known polymorphisms and sic novel mitochondrial variants. The present study confirmed that the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene is a hot spot for mutations associated with hearing impairment. ©The Authors Journal compilation ©2010 Biochemical Society.


Fendri-Kriaa N.,University of Sfax | Boujilbene S.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Kammoun F.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Mkaouar-Rebai E.,University of Sfax | And 4 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2011

Dravet syndrome (DS), previously known as severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, is one of the most severe forms of childhood epilepsy. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium-channel alpha-subunit gene (SCN1A). However, 25-30% of patients with DS are negative for the SCN1A mutation screening, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms may account for these disorders. Recently, the first case of DS caused by a mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium-channel beta-subunit gene (SCN1B) was also reported. In this report we aim to make the molecular analysis of the SCN1A and SCN1B genes in two Tunisian patients affected with DS. The SCN1A and SCN1B genes were tested for mutations by direct sequencing. No mutation was revealed in the SCN1A and SCN1B genes by sequencing analyses. On the other hand, 11 known single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the SCN1A gene and composed a putative disease-associated haplotype in patients with DS phenotype. One of the two patients with putative disease-associated haplotype in SCN1A had also one known single nucleotide polymorphism in the SCN1B gene. The sequencing analyses of the SCN1A gene revealed the presence of a putative disease-associated haplotype in two patients affected with Dravet syndrome. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Fendri-Kriaa N.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Kammoun F.,Service De Neurologie Infantile | Salem I.H.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Mkaouar-Rebai E.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Neurology | Year: 2011

Background: Febrile seizures (FSs) relatively represent the most common form of childhood seizures. FSs are not thought of as a true epileptic disease but rather as a special syndrome characterized by its provoking factor (fever) and a typical range of 3months to 5years. Although specific genes affecting the majority of FS cases have not been identified yet, several genetic loci for FSs have been reported recently. The aim of this report is to search for the gene responsible for FSs in six affected Tunisian families. Methods: A microsatellite marker analysis was performed on the known FS and generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) loci. According to the results obtained by statistical analyses for the six studied families and in agreement with the involvement of SCN1B gene in the GEFS+ syndrome in previous studies, SCN1B on GEFS+1 locus was considered as one of the potential candidate genes and was tested for mutations by direct sequencing. Results: A sequencing analysis of the SCN1B gene revealed a novel mutation (c.374G>T) that changed an arginine residue with leucine at position 125 of the protein. We consider that the variation R125L may affect the protein structure and stability by the loss of hydrogen bonding. Two identified single nucleotide polymorphisms that are located in a neighboring hypothetical polyadenylation were assumed to compose a putative disease-associated haplotype. Conclusion: Our results support that SCN1B is the gene responsible in one amongst the six FS Tunisian families studied and might contribute to the FS susceptibility for the five others. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.


PubMed | University of Sfax and Service de Neurologie Infantile
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Journal of child neurology | Year: 2015

Rett syndrome is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. The aim of this study was to search for mutations of MECP2 gene in Tunisian Rett patients and to evaluate the impact of the found variants on structural and functional features of MeCP2. The result of mutation analysis revealed that 3 Rett patients shared the same novel heterozygous point mutation c.175G>C (p.A59P). The p.A59P mutation was located in a conserved amino acid in the N-terminal segment of MeCP2. This novel mutation confers a phenotypic variability with different clinical severity scores (3, 8, and 9) and predicted by Sift and PolyPhen to be damaging. Modeling results showed that p.A59P adds 2 hydrogen bonds and changes the structural conformation of MeCP2 with a significant root mean square deviation value (9.66 ), suggesting that this mutation could probably affect the conformation, function and stability of MeCP2.


Fendri-Kriaa N.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Mkaouar-Rebai E.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Moalla D.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Belguith N.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Child Neurology | Year: 2010

Rett syndrome is a severe disorder characterized by loss of acquired skills after a period of normal development in infant girls. It is caused mainly by mutations in the MECP2 gene. In this study, we reported mutations in the MECP2 gene in 7 Tunisian patients with classic Rett syndrome. The results showed the presence of a double mutation in 1 patient: p.R306C and c.1461+98insA, which create a new hypothetical polyadenylation site in the 3 ĝ€2UTR of the MECP2 gene. We also detected in another patient a new variant c.1461+92C>G in the 3ĝ€2UTR located previous to 34 bp from the polyadenylation site with a score of 4.085. This variation is located in a hypothetical splicing enhancer with a score of 1.96277 according to the ESE finder program. In the remaining 5 patients, we found 2 common mutations: p.T158M in 4 individuals and p.R168X in only 1 girl. © The Author(s) 2010.


Mkaouar-Rebai E.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Ellouze E.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Chamkha I.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Kammoun F.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Child Neurology | Year: 2011

Cytochrome c oxidase is an essential component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen by reduced cytochrome c. In this study, the authors report the second mutation associated with Leigh syndrome in the blood and buccal mucosa of 2 affected members of a Tunisian family. It was a novel heteroplasmic missense mitochondrial mutation at nucleotide 9478 in the gene specifying subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase substituting the valine at position 91 to alanine in a highly conserved amino acid. It was found with a high mutant load in tissues derived from endoderm (buccal mucosa) and mesoderm (blood). However, it was nearly absent in tissue derived from ectoderm (hair follicles). It was absent in 120 healthy controls, and PolyPhen analysis showed that the hydropathy index changed from +1.276 to +0.242, and the number of structures of the 3D protein decreased from 39 to 32. © The Author(s) 2011.


Mkaouar-Rebai E.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Kammoun F.,Service de Neurologie Infantile | Chamkha I.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | Kammoun N.,Laboratoire Of Genetique Moleculaire Humaine | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Child Neurology | Year: 2010

Mitochondrial DNA defects were known to be associated with a wide spectrum of human diseases and patients might present a wide range of clinical features in various combinations. In the current study, we described a patient with psychomotor and neurodevelopmental delay, mild hyperintensity of posterior periventicular white matter, generalized clonic seizures, leukodystrophy, and congenital deafness. He also had tetraplegia, with central blindness and swallowing difficulty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed involvement of the interpeduncular nucleus and central tegmental tract, white matter abnormalities, and cerebellar atrophy. A whole mitochondrial genome screening revealed the presence of 19 reported polymorphisms and an undescribed A to G mutation at nucleotide 8411 (p.M16V) affecting a conserved region of the mitochondrial adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) 8 protein. This de novo mutation was detected in heteroplasmic form (97%) and was absent in 120 controls. Thus, the m.8411A>G mutation could strongly be associated with the disease in the tested patient. © 2010 The Author(s).

Loading Service de Neurologie Infantile collaborators
Loading Service de Neurologie Infantile collaborators