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Le Goff C.,Service de Chimie Clinique | Souberbielle J.-C.,Service des Explorations Fonctionnelles | Cavalier E.,Service de Chimie Clinique
Annales de Biologie Clinique | Year: 2015

The constantly increasing requests for the measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D over the last years has led reagent manufacturers to market different automated and semi-automated methods, that being unfortunately not fully harmonized, yield different results. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry has more recently been introduced. This approach allows the distinction between the two forms of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and to measure other metabolites. This approach also requires harmonization to curtail the differences between the different analytical methods. To meet this requirement, the American national institutes of health (NIH), the CDC (Center for disease control and prevention) in Atlanta, the NIST (National institute of standards and technology) and the vitamin D Reference laboratory of Ghent University have pooled their expertise to develop a standardization program. This article reviews the main elements and the difficulties of the automated and semi-automated methods for 25-hydroxyvitamin D, from sample preparation to the analytical phase, as well as those related to mass spectrometry. It also addresses the issues related to the clinical decision thresholds and the possibility of measurements in different biological liquids. Source


Le Goff C.,Service de Chimie Clinique | Cavalier E.,Service de Chimie Clinique | Souberbielle J.-C.,Service des Explorations Fonctionnelles | Gonzalez-Antuna A.,Service de Chimie Clinique
Practical Laboratory Medicine | Year: 2015

The constantly increasing requests for the measurement of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D over the last years has led reagent manufacturers to market different automated and semi-automated methods, that being unfortunately not fully harmonized, yield different results. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS2) has more recently been introduced. This approach allows the distinction between the two forms of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and to measure other metabolites. This approach also requires harmonization to curtail the differences between the different analytical methods. To meet this requirement, the American National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the vitamin D Reference laboratory of Ghent University have pooled their expertise to develop a standardization program.This article reviews the main elements and the difficulties of the automated and semi-automated methods for 25-hydroxyvitamin D, from sample preparation to the analytical phase, as well as those related to mass spectrometry. It also emphasizes the need for standardization to better define the clinical decision thresholds of vitamin D nutritional status. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Souberbielle J.-C.,Service des Explorations Fonctionnelles | Courbebaisse M.,Service des Explorations Fonctionnelles | Cormier C.,Service de Rhumatologie A | Pierrot-Deseilligny C.,Service de Neurologie 1 | And 2 more authors.
Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation | Year: 2012

The many recently published data on vitamin D have raised much interest in the medical community. One of the consequences has been a great increase in the prescription of vitamin D concentration measurements in clinical practice. It must be reminded that only the measurement of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration is indicated to evaluate vitamin D status. Furthermore, since vitamin D insufficiency is so common, since treatment is inexpensive and has a large safety margin, and since we already have much data suggesting that besides its classic effects on bone and mineral metabolism, vitamin D may potentially be helpful for the prevention/management of several diseases, perhaps should it be prescribed to everyone without prior testing? In our opinion, there are however groups of patients in whom estimation of vitamin D status is legitimate and may be recommended. This includes patients in whom a "reasonably" evidence-based target concentration (i.e., based on randomized clinical trials when possible) should be achieved and/or maintained such as patients with rickets/osteomalacia, osteoporosis, chronic kidney disease and kidney transplant recipients, malabsorption, primary hyperparathyroidism, granulomatous disease, and those receiving treatments potentially inducing bone loss. Other patients in whom vitamin D concentration may be measured are those with symptoms compatible with a severe vitamin D deficiency or excess persisting without explanation such as those with diffuse pain, or elderly individuals who fall, or those receiving treatments which modify vitamin D metabolism such as some anti-convulsants. Measurement of Vitamin D concentrations should also be part of any exploration of calcium/phosphorus metabolism which includes measurement of serum calcium, phosphate and PTH. © 2012 Informa Healthcare. Source


Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of "VeinoPlus Sport" on amateur soccer players' recovery after an intense physical activity (2 drills). Method: We proceeded to a comparative study between two devices: "VeinoPlus Sport" and "TENS" (used as a control system) on a population of 20 players (average age 17,1 ± 0,8). Under identical conditions each player used the two devices during two separate sessions (called group "VeinoPlus Sport" and group "TENS"). The players performed an intense effort following the YoYo test concept. Four blood samples were taken from each participant and a Myotest evaluation was performed: one before the test, one just after the first intense effort, another after a short recovery time following the first effort, and the last one right after the second intense effort. For statistical analysis, we used the Anova algorithm of the "StatPlus" system and a Scheffé test. Results: With both devices, we observed a significant elevation of lactate, HCO3 - ions, and myoglobin as time progressed. The analysis of other blood parameters did not show any significant evolution in the course of the testing. The "VeinoPlus Sport" group, after the session, expressed feeling lighter and more fit than usual following an intense physical activity. They did not suffer any pain, tiredness, nor diminishment of strength. The same observation was made with the "TENS" group with the exception that some players felt a bit of soreness in their thigh and calf areas. In general, all participants admitted preferring the use of recovery machines instead of natural recovery. At the same time, none expressed any preferences between either of the devices. Conclusion: The main asset of this study resided in the highlighting of minor differences as no way significant between the two machines tested on the chosen population. The "TENS" shows similar results as the "VeinoPlus Sport" even if a slight preference for the latter was expressed. Both devices permitted an equal or even better performance in the second drill in comparison to the first drill. © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. Source

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