SERMA Technologies

Pessac, France

SERMA Technologies

Pessac, France

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Durier A.,Continental AG | Marot C.,Airbus | Alilou O.,SERMA Technologies
IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility | Year: 2013

Integrated Circuit obsolescence is a strong economic constraint for electronic suppliers. It becomes essential to develop a methodology aiming to guarantee the non regression of EMC performances of equipments during an immunity test. The use of numerical simulation tools seems to be a way to reach this target. But these tools need first EMC behavioral component's models built from the most appropriate EMC measurements. © 2013 EMC Europe Foundation.


News Article | November 28, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

ROME, Nov. 28, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) Joint Undertaking announced the Lab4MEMS project as the winner of its 2016 Innovation Award during the European Nanoelectronics Forum, in Rome, Italy. At its launch in January 2014, Lab4MEMS was identified as a Key Enabling Technology Pilot-Line project for next-generation Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices augmented with advanced technologies such as piezoelectric or magnetic materials and 3D packaging to enhance the next generation of smart sensors, actuators, micro-pumps, and energy harvesters. These technologies were recognized as important contributors to future data-storage, printing, healthcare, automotive, industrial-control, and smart-building applications, as well as consumer applications such as smartphones and navigation devices. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, "The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project's execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies." In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST's MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. All of these successes contributed to the Lab4MEMS project and are available to benefit the contributors. These participants were Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per la Nanoelettronica (Italy); Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (France); SERMA Technologies SA (France); STMicroelectronics Ltd. (Malta); Universita ta Malta (Malta); Solmates BV (Netherlands); Cavendish Kinetics BV (Netherlands); Okmetic OYJ (Finland); VTT (Finland); Picosun OY (Finland); KLA-Tencor ICOS (Belgium); Universitatea Politehnica din Bucuresti (Romania); Instytut Technologii Elektronowej (Poland); Stiftelsen SINTEF (Norway); Sonitor Technologies AS (Norway); BESI GmbH (Austria). [1] The total cost of the project - € 28.2 million - was supported in part by funding from the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and by contributions from each of the respective National agencies: Italy, France, Malta, The Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Poland, Norway, Austria, Romania. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/58bc7ac2-94f2-4219-b124-e313a3235239


ROME, 01-Dec-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — The Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership (ECSEL) Joint Undertaking announced the Lab4MEMS project as the winner of its 2016 Innovation Award during the European Nanoelectronics Forum, in Rome, Italy. At its launch in January 2014, Lab4MEMS was identified as a Key Enabling Technology Pilot-Line project for next-generation Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices augmented with advanced technologies such as piezoelectric or magnetic materials and 3D packaging to enhance the next generation of smart sensors, actuators, micro-pumps, and energy harvesters. These technologies were recognized as important contributors to future data-storage, printing, healthcare, automotive, industrial-control, and smart-building applications, as well as consumer applications such as smartphones and navigation devices. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, “The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project’s execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies. In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST’s MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. In accepting the award, Roberto Zafalon, General Project Coordinator of Lab4MEMS and the European Programs Manager in R&D and Public Affairs for STMicroelectronics Italy said, “The ECSEL Innovation Award highlights the excellent results the Lab4MEMS team achieved through the project’s execution and the high impact of its successes. In particular, Lab4MEMS developed innovative MEMS solutions with advanced piezoelectric and magnetic materials, including advanced 3D Packaging technologies.” In coordinating the €28m[1], 36-month Lab4MEMS project, ST led the team of twenty partners, which included universities, research institutions, and technology businesses across ten European countries. ST’s MEMS facilities in Italy and Malta contributed their complete set of manufacturing competencies for next-generation devices, spanning design and fabrication to test and packaging to the project. All of these successes contributed to the Lab4MEMS project and are available to benefit the contributors. These participants were Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Fondazione Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italy); Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Consorzio Nazionale Interuniversitario per la Nanoelettronica (Italy); Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (France); SERMA Technologies SA (France); STMicroelectronics Ltd. (Malta); Universita ta Malta (Malta); Solmates BV (Netherlands); Cavendish Kinetics BV (Netherlands); Okmetic OYJ (Finland); VTT (Finland); Picosun OY (Finland); KLA-Tencor ICOS (Belgium); Universitatea Politehnica din Bucuresti (Romania); Instytut Technologii Elektronowej (Poland); Stiftelsen SINTEF (Norway); Sonitor Technologies AS (Norway); BESI GmbH (Austria). [1] The total cost of the project – € 28.2 million – was supported in part by funding from the ECSEL Joint Undertaking and by contributions from each of the respective National agencies: Italy, France, Malta, The Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Poland, Norway, Austria, Romania.


Arabi F.,University of Bordeaux 1 | Theolier L.,University of Bordeaux 1 | Martineau D.,Safran Group | Deletage J.-Y.,University of Bordeaux 1 | And 2 more authors.
Microelectronics Reliability | Year: 2016

The eutectic Au80Sn20 solder alloy has been applied in semiconductor assemblies and other industries for years. Due to some superior physical properties, Au/Sn alloy gradually becomes one of the best materials for soldering in electronic devices and components packaging but the voids growth in AuSn solder joints is one of the many critical factors governing the solder joint reliability. Voids may degrade the mechanical robustness of the die attach and consequently affect the reliability and thermal conducting performance of the assembly. Severe thermal cycles [− 55 °C/+175 °C] have highlighted degradations in AuSn die attach solder. The inspection of as-prepared die-attachments by X-ray and SEM (observation of cross-section) shows that the initial voids sizes were increased and a propagation of transverse cracks inside the joint between voids has appeared after ageing, it was featured also the existence of the IMC typical scallop-shape morphology with the phase structure of (Ni, Au)3Sn2 on as-reflowed joints. In this paper, we evaluate the origin of these degradations and ways to address them. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd


Diot J.-L.,NovaPack SAS | Dauphin F.,NovaPack SAS | Frank T.,Serma technologies | De Langlade R.,NovaPack SAS
IMAPS Nordic Annual Conference 2016 Proceedings | Year: 2016

As a low cost alternative to ceramic packages, cavity packages are developed based on injection molding of high temperature compliant thermoplastic on metallic lead-frames. Design flexibility of both lead-frame technology and injection molding process allows fabrication of a broad variety of packages. In particular, QFN (Quad Flat No-lead) packages family is one of the most attractive families, thanks to its miniaturization. Due to its geometry, reliability of packages mounted on PCB (2nd level reliability) is a key issue for QFN usage. Then, in this paper, second level reliability results of our own manufactured QFN cavity packages are presented: QFN 9x9-44 Leads package is chosen for these trials. Daisy chain packages are assembled and two assembly options are investigated: packages sealed with a thermoplastic lid and packages with their cavity filled with a cured liquid thermoset encapsulant. For the first option, package deformations during board assembly are evidenced. These results are discussed in the perspective of the mechanical properties of LCP, and more generally of all types of plastics (thermoplastic and thermoset), at high temperature. Reliability results are analyzed and compared with previous results obtained on a smaller package (QFN 7x7-32 Leads cavity package) with different stress conditions.


Moro N.,French Atomic Energy Commission | Moro N.,Paris-Sorbonne University | Heydemann K.,Paris-Sorbonne University | Dehbaoui A.,SERMA Technologies | And 2 more authors.
Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE International Symposium on Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust, HOST 2014 | Year: 2014

Injection of transient faults can be used as a way to attack embedded systems. On embedded processors such as microcontrollers, several studies showed that such a transient fault injection with glitches or electromagnetic pulses could corrupt either the data loads from the memory or the assembly instructions executed by the circuit. Some countermeasure schemes which rely on temporal redundancy have been proposed to handle this issue. Among them, several schemes add this redundancy at assembly instruction level. In this paper, we perform a practical evaluation for two of those countermeasure schemes by using a pulsed electromagnetic fault injection process on a 32-bit microcontroller. We provide some necessary conditions for an efficient implementation of those countermeasure schemes in practice. We also evaluate their efficiency and highlight their limitations. To the best of our knowledge, no experimental evaluation of the security of such instruction-level countermeasure schemes has been published yet. © 2014 IEEE.


Amellal M.,ESEO EMC | Ramdani M.,ESEO EMC | Perdriau R.,ESEO EMC | Medina M.,SERMA Technologies | And 2 more authors.
IEEE International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility | Year: 2013

This paper focus on the conducted immunity measurement of non-volatile memories up to 1 GHz. A specific measurement flow is introduced, which makes possible to compare the EMC performances in different test cases. Trough measurements and simulation, this study gives a real view on the immunity difference of this integrated circuits (IC). © 2013 EMC Europe Foundation.


Martinelli L.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Desgranges C.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Rouillard F.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Ginestar K.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Corrosion Science | Year: 2015

Fe-9Cr steel was oxidized in pure water vapour and in CO2 at 550°C. In both environments the Fe-Cr spinel layer was composed of small equiaxed grains which stoichiometry evolved from Fe2.7Cr0.3O4 to Fe2CrO4 in H2O and from Fe2.6Cr0.4O4 to Fe1.9Cr1.1O4 in CO2. In both cases the mean stoichiometry was Fe2.3Cr0.7O4. Single oxidation mechanism was proposed: the "available space model". Carbon for oxidation in CO2 and hydrogen for oxidation in H2O were detected at metal/oxide interface within the steel. These atoms could be responsible for nanometric cavities formation by trapping vacancies created by outward cationic diffusion. © 2015.


Lancia J.,SERMA Technologies
Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) | Year: 2013

In this paper, we present a paradigm for combined attacks on Java Cards that lowers the requirements on the localization precision of the fault injection. The attack relies on educated objects allocation to create favorable memory patterns that raise the chances of success of the combined attack. In order to maximize the probability of successful injection, we determine the optimal parameters depending on the physical properties of the targeted platform. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of our approach through fault injection simulation. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.


Martinelli L.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Desgranges C.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Rouillard F.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | Ginestar K.,CEA Saclay Nuclear Research Center | And 2 more authors.
Corrosion Science | Year: 2015

Fe-9Cr steel was oxidized in pure water vapour and in CO2 at 550°C. In both environments the Fe-Cr spinel layer was composed of small equiaxed grains which stoichiometry evolved from Fe2.7Cr0.3O4 to Fe2CrO4 in H2O and from Fe2.6Cr0.4O4 to Fe1.9Cr1.1O4 in CO2. In both cases the mean stoichiometry was Fe2.3Cr0.7O4. Single oxidation mechanism was proposed: the "available space model". Carbon for oxidation in CO2 and hydrogen for oxidation in H2O were detected at metal/oxide interface within the steel. These atoms could be responsible for nanometric cavities formation by trapping vacancies created by outward cationic diffusion. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

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