Champaign, IL, United States
Champaign, IL, United States

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Langer J.L.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Langer J.L.,Serionix Inc. | Economy J.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign | Cahill D.G.,University of Illinois at Urbana - Champaign
Macromolecules | Year: 2012

Absorption of water in cationic polyelectrolyte thin films is investigated by measuring mass uptake and mechanical stress using a quartz crystal microbalance and scanning optical laser apparatus, respectively. Thin layers of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride) and diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane are spin-cast onto quartz crystal sensors or cover glasses. Films are subsequently cured and reacted by nucleophilic substitution with trimethylamine, triethylamine, tripropylamine, or tributylamine to give an immobilized poly(vinylbenzyltrialkylammonium chloride) matrix. Water absorption in these films depends strongly on both the amine modifier and counterion present in the matrix. Mass uptake ranges from 5.7% for a tributylamine-modified film in perchlorate form to 52% for a trimethylamine-modified film in fluoride form. This water uptake results in a maximum relative compressive biaxial stress of -33 and -113 MPa for these two films, respectively. Mass uptake and biaxial stress data give evidence of yielding upon hydration and dehydration. The yielding is attributed to elasto-viscoplastic deformation and influenced by a depression of the glass transition temperature via plasticizing. The Young's modulus (Y f) of the unmodified film is measured from biaxial stress and ellipsometric thickness to be 3.9 GPa, consistent with structurally related polystyrene and slightly lower than Y f = 5.0 GPa as measured acoustically. These results support the prevailing theory relating selectivity and diffusion in perchlorate-selective anion-exchange resins to hydrophilicity and water content and also suggest the mechanical properties of hydrophobic polycations may be effectively controlled through judicious selection of fixed ion and counterion. © 2012 American Chemical Society.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 464.72K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project will result in the continuing development of novel ultrafast, highly selective, high permeability ion-exchange fiber composites (IXFCs) for removing perchlorate from drinking water. The proposed material removes perchlorate 10-100 times faster than the best available technology and employs a low-cost production method compatible with widely available manufacturing equipment. Rapid contaminant removal is made possible by the use of micron-scale mass transfer distances; whereas commonly used beads and granular media are limited to much larger sizes resulting in drawbacks such as difficult containment and enormous pressure drops. However, IXFCs display both high permeability and self-containment due to their permanently intertwined, self-supporting structure. Serionix demonstrated the feasibility of this technology in Phase I and will continue in the Phase II with the following key goals: 1) optimization of ultra-high capacity IXFCs for perchlorate removal; 2) design/build IXFC purification cartridges for evaluation by industrial partners; 3) identify and validate chemistries for complimentary IXFCs that are selective for heavy metals such as lead and mercury; and 4) produce IXFCs at a pilot scale and develop strategy for commercial production. The broader impact/commercial potential of this research is the development and commercialization of a low-cost technology enabling regulatory compliance and improved protection of human health. The first targeted application is perchlorate, which the EPA is set to regulate in drinking water by 2014. This represents only the first commercial opportunity for a platform technology with the ultimate potential to transform the industrial and residential water treatment landscape. Future applications may include ultrahigh efficiency water deionization, softening, and industrial wastewater recycling, personal protective equipment and clothing, and high activity solid acid/base catalysts. Dissemination of data and interpretation will contribute to improved understanding of mass transfer characteristics in fibrous sorbent materials used in both water and air treatment.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: SMALL BUSINESS PHASE II | Award Amount: 698.59K | Year: 2013

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project will result in the continuing development of novel ultrafast, highly selective, high permeability ion-exchange fiber composites (IXFCs) for removing perchlorate from drinking water. The proposed material removes perchlorate 10-100 times faster than the best available technology and employs a low-cost production method compatible with widely available manufacturing equipment. Rapid contaminant removal is made possible by the use of micron-scale mass transfer distances; whereas commonly used beads and granular media are limited to much larger sizes resulting in drawbacks such as difficult containment and enormous pressure drops. However, IXFCs display both high permeability and self-containment due to their permanently intertwined, self-supporting structure. Serionix demonstrated the feasibility of this technology in Phase I and will continue in the Phase II with the following key goals: 1) optimization of ultra-high capacity IXFCs for perchlorate removal; 2) design/build IXFC purification cartridges for evaluation by industrial partners; 3) identify and validate chemistries for complimentary IXFCs that are selective for heavy metals such as lead and mercury; and 4) produce IXFCs at a pilot scale and develop strategy for commercial production.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this research is the development and commercialization of a low-cost technology enabling regulatory compliance and improved protection of human health. The first targeted application is perchlorate, which the EPA is set to regulate in drinking water by 2014. This represents only the first commercial opportunity for a platform technology with the ultimate potential to transform the industrial and residential water treatment landscape. Future applications may include ultrahigh efficiency water deionization, softening, and industrial wastewater recycling, personal protective equipment and clothing, and high activity solid acid/base catalysts. Dissemination of data and interpretation will contribute to improved understanding of mass transfer characteristics in fibrous sorbent materials used in both water and air treatment.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 165.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will result in the development of novel ultrafast, highly selective, high permeability ion-exchange fiber composites for removing perchlorate from drinking water. The proposed technology removes perchlorate 10-100 times faster than the best currently available options, and employs a low-cost production method compatible with widely available manufacturing equipment. Rapid contaminant removal is made possible by the use of micron-scale mass transfer distances; whereas commonly used beads and granular media are limited to much larger sizes because of significant drawbacks including difficult containment and enormous pressure drop, fiber composites display both high permeability and self-containment due to their permanently intertwined, self-supporting structure. Serionix will demonstrate feasibility of this new technology through the following activities: 1) preparation of active resin/substrate fiber composites using a spray-casting method; 2) characterization of perchlorate-removal efficiency in both continuous and intermittent flow configurations; and 3) research and development of pretreatment methods to replace the current processing solvent (acetone) with water and to improve composite wetting properties.

The broader/commercial impact of this research is the development and commercialization of a low-cost technology enabling regulatory compliance and improved protection of human health. The EPA is set to regulate perchlorate in drinking water by 2014. This application represents only the first commercial opportunity for a platform technology with the ultimate potential to transform the industrial and residential water treatment landscape. Future applications may include ultrahigh efficiency water deionization, softening, and industrial wastewater recycling, personal protective equipment and clothing, and high activity solid acid/base catalysts. Dissemination of data and interpretation will contribute to improved understanding of mass transfer characteristics in fibrous sorbent materials used in both water and air treatment.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project will result in the development of novel ultrafast, highly selective, high permeability ion-exchange fiber composites for removing perchlorate from drinking water. The proposed technology removes perchlorate 10-100 times faster than the best currently available options, and employs a low-cost production method compatible with widely available manufacturing equipment. Rapid contaminant removal is made possible by the use of micron-scale mass transfer distances; whereas commonly used beads and granular media are limited to much larger sizes because of significant drawbacks including difficult containment and enormous pressure drop, fiber composites display both high permeability and self-containment due to their permanently intertwined, self-supporting structure. Serionix will demonstrate feasibility of this new technology through the following activities: 1) preparation of active resin/substrate fiber composites using a spray-casting method; 2) characterization of perchlorate-removal efficiency in both continuous and intermittent flow configurations; and 3) research and development of pretreatment methods to replace the current processing solvent (acetone) with water and to improve composite wetting properties. The broader/commercial impact of this research is the development and commercialization of a low-cost technology enabling regulatory compliance and improved protection of human health. The EPA is set to regulate perchlorate in drinking water by 2014. This application represents only the first commercial opportunity for a platform technology with the ultimate potential to transform the industrial and residential water treatment landscape. Future applications may include ultrahigh efficiency water deionization, softening, and industrial wastewater recycling, personal protective equipment and clothing, and high activity solid acid/base catalysts. Dissemination of data and interpretation will contribute to improved understanding of mass transfer characteristics in fibrous sorbent materials used in both water and air treatment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.98K | Year: 2012

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) both pose a significant threat to DoD personnel both in the field as well as in established infrastructure such as large buildings. Current VOC/TIC protection technologies suffer from incomplete removal of contaminants, high operating costs, and limitation to single-use only. Recent research suggests activated carbon fibers (ACFs) are an optimal platform for continuous chemical protection due to high capacity and rapid rates of adsorption and desorption. Traditional ACFs unfortunately suffer from exorbitant costs. This SBIR Phase I project will result in the development of ultrafast, high permeability, regenerable ACFs based on a low-cost carbon-on-glass geometry. Serionix will demonstrate feasibility of this new technology through the following activities: 1) preparation of ACFs using a dip-coating method; 2)characterization of tunable TIC (ammonia, NO2) adsorption capability of the ACFs; 3) research and development of new synthesis and regeneration techniques to maximize the efficiency of the system.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

Development of an advanced lightweight Trace Contaminant Control filter will play a critical role in the viability of life support systems for future space and interplanetary missions. Serionix has developed proprietary adsorptive coatings which can be applied to both porous and nonporous substrates to yield functional composite media capable of rapid, efficient, adsorption of trace ammonia and formaldehyde. In preliminary testing, this flexible system has exhibited 7 times higher ammonia capacity relative to conventional phosphoric-impregnated activated carbon. The primary objective of this Phase I effort is to design and demonstrate a lightweight, high performing system for removal of ammonia and formaldehyde from next generation spacecraft and space suits. Systems for both vacuum-swing and single use adsorption will be extensively evaluated. Secondary performance characteristics such as pressure drop, flammability, and gravimetric/volumetric efficiency will be quantified internally while media prototypes will be delivered to NASA for evaluation. Building off of a successful Phase I demonstration, the focus of Phase II will be to optimize the system and prototype components to yield mass and volume savings for NASA life support systems. Parallel goals include demonstration of full-scale manufacturing capability and commercialization into industrial applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 449.33K | Year: 2013

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) both pose a significant threat to DoD personnel both in the field as well as in established infrastructure such as large buildings. Current VOC/TIC protection technologies suffer from incomplete removal of contaminants, high operating costs, and limitation to single-use only. Recent research


Trademark
Serionix Inc. | Date: 2016-10-06

Filters and filtration media for filtration and purification of air and fluids.


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