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PUTRAJAYA, Malaysia, May 18, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- UBM, the largest exhibition organiser in Asia has joined with the Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry Malaysia in holding the international livestock exhibition "Livestock Malaysia 2017" from 28 September to 1 October 2017 with the theme "Bringing Technology to Farmers". This period will correspond with the National Farmers, Livestock Breeders and Fisherman's Day 2017 (HPPNK) and will be held at the Malaysia Agro Exposition Park Serdang (MAEPS) for the first time. It will feature three other main events, namely the Malaysia Food Festival (MFF), the Malaysia International Agro-Tourism Exhibition (MIATE) and Livestock Malaysia 2017 -- The Malaysia International Trade Exhibition and Conference for Product, Technology, Service and Innovation for Feed, Livestock and Meat Industry. Livestock Malaysia will take place at Hall C, MAEPS. "Livestock Malaysia will bring new products, services and technology to improve the productivity of the livestock sector. It will display innovative technology and products which will enhance the growth of animal protein production in Malaysia and allow traditional farmers to learn new methods to improve their efficiency," said Dato' Sri Ahmad Shabery Cheek, the Minister of Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry during the press conference today. With support from the government's policy of promoting sustainable farming and protecting the environment, closed farming is a new technology that should be introduced to medium and small farmers to improve global food safety and the ability to trace the sources of food. Livestock, a major source of animal protein, is regarded as the most affordable and wholesome food for most consumers. "With over 120 companies from 20 countries and regions exhibiting at Livestock Malaysia, the expo will put on display the latest technologies and equipment for feed, farming, animal health, processing and many more sectors. The four-day exhibition will offer numerous opportunities for interaction amongst industry players seeking new business, updating themselves on the latest technological and market trends, as well as networking and finding solutions to their problems," said Dr. Ahmad Mustaffa Babjee, Chairman of UBM Malaysia. The concurrent conferences, seminars and technology symposium that will take place alongside the exhibition will act as effective educational sources for industry players to keep abreast of the latest trends and challenges. Apart from these, a seminar to educate the public on "safe food and value" will be organised to disseminate knowledge of food safety and encourage a correct understanding of the consumption of animal protein. UBM also expect to attract farmers from the poultry and ruminant sectors to the event. Hosted by the Department of Veterinary Services (DVS), Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry Malaysia, the event has garnered strong support from the Federation of Livestock Farmers' Associations of Malaysia (FLFAM), the World Poultry Science Association (WPSA) and the Veterinary Association of Malaysia (VAM). Livestock Malaysia is specifically designed to introduce cutting-edge solutions by inviting professionals, decision makers and end-users in the livestock industry to attend this event. Livestock Malaysia is organised by United Business Media (M) Sdn Bhd, which is the region's top organiser of livestock events, and is open to trade and professionals on 28 - 29 September and open to public on 30 September and 1 October. Owned by UBM plc listed on the London Stock Exchange, UBM Asia is the largest trade show organiser in Asia and the largest commercial organiser in China, India, Malaysia and Thailand. Established with its headquarters in Hong Kong and subsidiary companies across Asia and in the US, UBM Asia has a strong global network of 32 offices and 1,300 staff in 24 major cities. We operate in 19 market sectors with 230 events, 28 trade publications, 18 online products for over 2,000,000 quality exhibitors, visitors, conference delegates, advertisers and subscribers from all over the world. This press information is issued by:-


KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia, Feb. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- According to the World Health Organization's Global Burden of Disease, it is estimated that 265,000 childhood deaths worldwide occur as a result of fire-related burns each year, with a majority of them occurring in low- and middle-income countries. More than half the deaths take place within the Southeast Asia region, including Malaysia, where it is reported that one child dies every two weeks due to fires or other burns. Recognizing the need to increase awareness of this global public health issue, today Safe Kids Malaysia Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Safe Kids Worldwide and Honeywell (NYSE: HON) launched Safe Kids at Home, an educational safety program designed to help prevent fires, burns and scalds among children ages 7 to 12 years old. The program is supported by Honeywell Hometown Solutions, the company's corporate citizenship initiative that focuses in five critical areas; family safety and security, science and math, housing and shelter, habitat and conservation and humanitarian relief. The program was developed based on the findings of a 2016 survey conducted by Safe Kids Malaysia and Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), one of the country's leading research universities. A new research report, How Safe is Your Home? Protecting Children from Fire, Burns and Scalds in Kuala Lumpur, was formally released today by YB. Datuk Halimah Mohamed Sadique, Deputy Minister of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government at an exclusive launch ceremony on the UPM campus in Serdang. In attendance were YB. Datuk Halimah Mohamed Sadique Deputy Minister of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government; Professor Datin Paduka Dr. Aini Ideris, UPM Vice-Chancellor; Associate Professor Dr. Kulanthayan KC Mani, Executive Director of Safe Kids Malaysia UPM; Briand Greer, President of Honeywell ASEAN; Kerry Kennedy, Director, Global Corporate Citizenship, Honeywell Hometown Solutions; and Tareka Wheeler, Director of Programs, Safe Kids Worldwide. "The Ministry would like to thank the industry partner - Honeywell for supporting and funding this initiative. This is a full fledge collaboration between the Academia, Industry, International and Government," said YB. Datuk Halimah Mohamed Sadique Deputy Minister of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government. Professor Dr. Aini of UPM noted, "As one of the top research universities in Malaysia, we are proud to partner with two outstanding global organizations - Safe Kids Worldwide and Honeywell. Additionally, we are pleased to work together with the Fire and Rescue Department of Malaysia, and will continue to contribute to initiatives that leave a long-lasting positive impact on societies at large." "The research has identified a critical need for fire and burn education for children, and we look forward to starting to implement the Safe Kids at Home program in nine schools in Sentul, Kuala Lumpur," said Dr. Kulanthayan of Safe Kids Malaysia UPM. YB. Datuk Halimah Mohamed Sadique Deputy Minister of Urban Wellbeing, Housing and Local Government also added "I highly hope Honeywell's support for this initiative which starts from Sentul will eventually be scaled up and reach more children in more areas over time and one day we can cover the entire nation". "Malaysia is the first country in ASEAN to launch the program and we are proud to partner with Safe Kids Malaysia UPM and Safe Kids Worldwide," said Greer of Honeywell ASEAN. "Honeywell is committed to improving people's quality of life by making measurable differences in the communities where we live and work. With the focused efforts on education, healthcare, enforcement and fire safety agencies, our goal is to educate every child on the importance of home safety and fire prevention." Safe Kids Worldwide is a nonprofit organization working to prevent childhood injury, the number one cause of death for children in the United States. Throughout the world, almost one million children die of an injury each year, and almost every one of these tragedies is preventable. Safe Kids works with an extensive network of more than 400 coalitions in the U.S. and with partners in more than 30 countries to reduce traffic injuries, drownings, falls, burns, poisonings and more. Since 1988, Safe Kids has helped reduce the U.S. childhood death rate from unintentional injury by 60 percent. Working together, we can do much more for kids everywhere. Join our effort at safekids.org. With the aim of improving the lives of children in Malaysia and in partnership with the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti of Putra Malaysia (UPM), Safe Kids Malaysia (SKM) was established in 2011 as a member of Safe Kids Worldwide. SKM works closely with government, industries, schools and communities to increase awareness about preventable injuries and deaths. The organization previously had a primary focus on road safety and drowning prevention, but now includes home safety education and awareness through the Safe Kids at Home program. Honeywell (www.honeywell.com) is a Fortune 100 diversified technology and manufacturing leader, serving customers worldwide with aerospace products and services; control technologies for buildings, homes and industry; turbochargers; and performance materials. For more news and information on Honeywell, please visit www.honeywell.com/newsroom. The operations in Malaysia started in 1985 and today Honeywell employs more than 1,500 employees in six cities across Malaysia including Kuala Lumpur, Petaling Jaya, Shah Alam, Penang, Kemaman and Johor Bahru. Our technologies and solutions, such as integrated avionics systems for aircrafts, process controls and technologies for refineries and building automation have been supporting Malaysia in its development of a safer, more secure and energy efficient society.


News Article | November 12, 2016
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Management and nutritional strategies are needed to protect livestock from heat stress resulting from climate change, according to a review paper published in the Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science. Safe and cost-effective animal protein will be vital to food security as the human population grows to an expected 11.2 billion by the year 2100. With climate change already having visible impacts, it is important to understand how it will affect the general health of livestock. Dr Veerasamy Sejian from India's ICAR-National Institute of Animal Nutrition and Physiology and colleagues reviewed the latest research on the effects of heat stress on livestock immunity. Livestock immune functions are either suppressed or enhanced, depending on the length of exposure to heat stress. Heat stress mainly affects the immune system through three endocrine glands: the hypothalamus and pituitary glands located in the brain, and the adrenal glands located above the kidneys. Activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to the secretion of hormones that affect various components of the immune system. Stress also impacts the system responsible for what is known as the flight-or-fright response. This system, called the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system, acts by releasing chemicals that enhance the breakdown of glycogen, increasing blood glucose levels so the body can meet its higher stress-induced energy requirements. Generally, activation of these two systems alters animals' immune functions, affecting the integrity of protective barriers and the response of immune cells to attacking pathogens. Heat stress also impacts critical events in the life cycle of livestock, including the passive transfer of maternal antibodies to offspring via milk and developing an effective response to vaccination. Effective management of animal shelters and providing evaporative cooling systems can play an important role in reducing the effects of heat on livestock. Rearing livestock that are selected for their heat tolerant genes can also form an effective protective strategy. Recent research has shown that modifying livestock nutrition can be an effective approach to manage the impacts of heat stress. Vitamin A and zinc supplements, for example, can help maintain protective barriers against pathogens in the gut and udders. Combined supplements of selenium and vitamin E can positively influence the ability of white blood cells to attack pathogens. Iron can also play an important role in promoting the development of immune-related glands. Another important protective strategy involves the naturally occurring bacteria present in the guts. Prebiotics are indigestible ingredients that stimulate the growth and activity of gut bacteria. When gut bacteria are healthy, they compete against invading bacteria for food, preventing the invaders from flourishing. Probiotics are mixtures of live microorganisms that are beneficial to animal health. These line the gut, strengthening its mechanical barrier. They also compete with pathogenic bacteria, making it more difficult for them to survive. The team's review could serve as a useful reference material for researchers aiming to improve livestock production in a changing climate scenario by means of optimizing livestock immune systems, the researchers conclude. For more information about this research, please contact: Dr Veerasamy Sejian Senior Scientist, Animal Physiology Division ICAR-National Institute of Animal Nutrition and Physiology Adugodi, Bangalore-560030, India Email: Tel: +91 9,108,025,711,420; Mobile: +91 9,740,726,121 About Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science (JTAS) Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science (JTAS) is published by Universiti Putra Malaysia in English and is open to authors around the world regardless of nationality. Beginning 2012, it would be published four times a year in February, May, August and November. Other Pertanika series include Pertanika Journal of Science & Technology (JST), and Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities (JSSH). JTAS aims to provide a forum for high quality research related to tropical agricultural research. Areas relevant to the scope of the journal include: agricultural biotechnology, biochemistry, biology, ecology, fisheries, forestry, food sciences, entomology, genetics, microbiology, pathology and management, physiology, plant and animal sciences, production of plants and animals of economic importance, and veterinary medicine. The journal publishes original academic articles dealing with research on issues of worldwide relevance. Website: http://www.pertanika.upm.edu.my/ The paper is available from this link: http://bit.ly/2fJbunT For more information about the journal, contact: The Chief Executive Editor (UPM Journals) Head, Journal Division, UPM Press Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (R&I) IDEA Tower 2, UPM-MDTC Technology Centre Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang, Selangor Malaysia. Phone: +603 8947 1622 | +6016 217 4050 Email: Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Pertanika Journal.


News Article | November 12, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

Selangor, Malaysia, Nov 12, 2016 - (ACN Newswire) - Management and nutritional strategies are needed to protect livestock from heat stress resulting from climate change, according to a review paper published in the Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science. Safe and cost-effective animal protein will be vital to food security as the human population grows to an expected 11.2 billion by the year 2100. With climate change already having visible impacts, it is important to understand how it will affect the general health of livestock.  Dr Veerasamy Sejian from India's ICAR-National Institute of Animal Nutrition and Physiology and colleagues reviewed the latest research on the effects of heat stress on livestock immunity. Livestock immune functions are either suppressed or enhanced, depending on the length of exposure to heat stress.  Heat stress mainly affects the immune system through three endocrine glands: the hypothalamus and pituitary glands located in the brain, and the adrenal glands located above the kidneys. Activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to the secretion of hormones that affect various components of the immune system. Stress also impacts the system responsible for what is known as the flight-or-fright response. This system, called the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system, acts by releasing chemicals that enhance the breakdown of glycogen, increasing blood glucose levels so the body can meet its higher stress-induced energy requirements. Generally, activation of these two systems alters animals' immune functions, affecting the integrity of protective barriers and the response of immune cells to attacking pathogens. Heat stress also impacts critical events in the life cycle of livestock, including the passive transfer of maternal antibodies to offspring via milk and developing an effective response to vaccination. Effective management of animal shelters and providing evaporative cooling systems can play an important role in reducing the effects of heat on livestock. Rearing livestock that are selected for their heat tolerant genes can also form an effective protective strategy. Recent research has shown that modifying livestock nutrition can be an effective approach to manage the impacts of heat stress. Vitamin A and zinc supplements, for example, can help maintain protective barriers against pathogens in the gut and udders. Combined supplements of selenium and vitamin E can positively influence the ability of white blood cells to attack pathogens. Iron can also play an important role in promoting the development of immune-related glands. Another important protective strategy involves the naturally occurring bacteria present in the guts. Prebiotics are indigestible ingredients that stimulate the growth and activity of gut bacteria. When gut bacteria are healthy, they compete against invading bacteria for food, preventing the invaders from flourishing. Probiotics are mixtures of live microorganisms that are beneficial to animal health. These line the gut, strengthening its mechanical barrier. They also compete with pathogenic bacteria, making it more difficult for them to survive. The team's review could serve as a useful reference material for researchers aiming to improve livestock production in a changing climate scenario by means of optimizing livestock immune systems, the researchers conclude. For more information about this research, please contact: Dr Veerasamy Sejian Senior Scientist, Animal Physiology Division ICAR-National Institute of Animal Nutrition and Physiology Adugodi, Bangalore-560030, India Email: [email protected]  Tel: +91 9,108,025,711,420; Mobile: +91 9,740,726,121 About Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science (JTAS) Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science (JTAS) is published by Universiti Putra Malaysia in English and is open to authors around the world regardless of nationality. Beginning 2012, it would be published four times a year in February, May, August and November. Other Pertanika series include Pertanika Journal of Science & Technology (JST), and Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities (JSSH). JTAS aims to provide a forum for high quality research related to tropical agricultural research. Areas relevant to the scope of the journal include: agricultural biotechnology, biochemistry, biology, ecology, fisheries, forestry, food sciences, entomology, genetics, microbiology, pathology and management, physiology, plant and animal sciences, production of plants and animals of economic importance, and veterinary medicine. The journal publishes original academic articles dealing with research on issues of worldwide relevance. Website: http://www.pertanika.upm.edu.my/ The paper is available from this link: http://bit.ly/2fJbunT For more information about the journal, contact: The Chief Executive Editor (UPM Journals) Head, Journal Division, UPM Press Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (R&I) IDEA Tower 2, UPM-MDTC Technology Centre Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang, Selangor Malaysia. Phone: +603 8947 1622 | +6016 217 4050 Email: [email protected] Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Pertanika Journal.


News Article | December 15, 2016
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Authoritative parenting is significantly linked to positive youth development, according to a recent study published in the Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities (JSSH). Malaysia, which aims to become a developed country by 2020, is keen to ensure that its young people grow into successful and competent adults who contribute to the country's growth. Positive youth development (PYD) is a good indicator for this as it measures an adolescent's strengths and capabilities based on five factors: competence, confidence, caring, connection and character. Previous studies showed that parents are the biggest influencers in determining the level of PYD in youths. Atefeh Kiadarbandsari and colleagues from the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) looked at whether different parenting styles and parental education levels correlate with PYD in Malaysian youths and how. They collected data from 496 students, ages 14 to 16, from national secondary schools in urban and rural areas in Selangor, Malaysia. The team also determined if the students' race, age, gender and location of their school (urban or rural) affected their PYD. Parenting style refers to the emotional climate through which parents communicate to their child. There are four styles: authoritative (responsive and warm, but strict), authoritarian (strict and demanding without being responsive or warm), permissive and uninvolved. Previous studies have shown that the authoritative style is the most beneficial for psychological and educational outcomes in adolescents in the western societies, but in other cultures, authoritarian parenting had a link to positive development of youths. In a recent JSSH paper, the UPM researchers found that authoritative and uninvolved parenting styles were significantly correlated with PYD - with the latter style being negatively correlated. In particular, students with authoritative parents were most likely to have higher PYD scores. They also found that if the father's education level was a university degree or higher, the correlation with PYD was positive and vice versa. There was no correlation between a mother's education level and the student's PYD. What's more, Malay students scored higher in PYD than non-Malay students, indicating that race/ethnicity might affect PYD scores. The researchers did not find any significant relationship between PYD scores and students' age, gender and school location. The researchers hope their study will help educators, policy makers, parents and practitioners to improve PYD among youths. They noted that the findings should be interpreted carefully, as the sample data was collected from only one state of Malaysia. Additional research should help explain the discrepancies between Malay and non-Malay students in PYD levels. For more information about this research, please contact: Atefeh Kiadarbandsari Department of Human Development and Family Studies Faculty of Human Ecology Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan Malaysia Email: Mobile: +6011 1628 8740 About Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities (JSSH) Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences & Humanities (JSSH) is published by Universiti Putra Malaysia in English and is open to authors around the world regardless of nationality. It is published four times a year in March, June, September and December. Other Pertanika series include Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science (JTAS), and Pertanika Journal of Science & Technology (JST). JSSH aims to develop as a pioneer journal for the social sciences with a focus on emerging issues pertaining to the social and behavioural sciences as well as the humanities. Areas relevant to the scope of the journal include Social Sciences - Accounting, anthropology, Archaeology and history, Architecture and habitat, Consumer and family economics, Economics, Education, Finance, Geography, Law, Management studies, Media and communication studies, Political sciences and public policy, Population studies, Psychology, Sociology, Technology management, Tourism; Humanities - Arts and culture, Dance, Historical and civilisation studies, Language and Linguistics, Literature, Music, Philosophy, Religious studies, Sports. The journal publishes original academic articles dealing with research on issues of worldwide relevance. The journals cater for scientists, professors, researchers, post-docs, scholars and students who wish to promote and communicate advances in the fields of Social Sciences & Humanities research. Website: http://www.pertanika.upm.edu.my/ The papers are available from the following links: http://bit.ly/2hwXcv2 For more information about the journal, contact: The Chief Executive Editor (UPM Journals) Head, Journal Division, UPM Press Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor (R&I) IDEA Tower 2, UPM-MDTC Technology Centre Universiti Putra Malaysia 43400 Serdang, Selangor Malaysia. Phone: +603 8947 1622 | +6016 217 4050 Email: Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Pertanika Journal.


Viyachai T.,University Putra Malaysia | Abdullah T.L.,University Putra Malaysia | Hassan S.,University Putra Malaysia | Kamarulzaman N.,Serdang | Wan Yusof W.A.,Agro Technology Park
American-Eurasian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture | Year: 2014

The influence of plant density on the growthand flowering of cut chrysanthemum in soilless culture under root restricted condition was investigated. Two varieties of cut chrysanthemum "New White" and "New Yellow" were grown in seedling tray in coconut peat media. Plants were arrangedat three different plant densities namely 64, 81 and 99 plants m2. There were no significant differences for leaf area, leaf length, number of internode and stem diameter between the three plant densities. However, "New Yellow" had significantly more number of inter nodes than "New White".Plant density affected to leaf area index (LAI) and pedicel length. Plants grown at 81 plants m-2had higher LAI of 2.76 than at 64 plants m-2 of 2.28.Pedicel length of plant density of 99 plants m-2 was longer than of 64 plants m-2by 18.33%. There was interaction effect between variety and plant density on number of leaf. Number of leaf tended to decrease when plant densities increase for varieties "New White". No significant differences were observed between the two varieties and three plant densities on root length, root surface area, root diameter, root volume and root shoot ratio. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll were not significantly affected by varieties and plant densities. Stem fresh weight and total dry weight did not differ between the three plant densities. Plant densities did not significantly affect to photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, Fv/Fm. Accumulation of proline was not significant difference between the three plant densities. Chrysanthemum grown at 99 m-2had the tallest plant of 61.28 cm although it was not significantly different from the other two plant densities. Plant densities did not significantly affect to dayto flowering, number of flowers, flower diameter, inflorescence diameter,flowercolor and vase life. These results indicated that under root restriction, chrysanthemum can be grown up to99 plants m2. © 2014 AENSI PUBLISHER All rights reserved.


Pendashteh A.R.,Serdang | Fakhru'l-Razi A.,Serdang | Fakhru'l-Razi A.,University Putra Malaysia | Madaeni S.S.,Razi University | And 3 more authors.
Chemical Engineering Journal | Year: 2011

This study focused on the characterization of fouling cake layer during operation of a membrane bioreactor system employed for the treatment of synthetic hypersaline oily wastewater. Also the effects of ultrasound and addition of four types of flocculants (aluminium sulfate, Chitosan, ferric chloride, polyaluminium chloride) on mitigation of membrane fouling were studied. The components of the foulants were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and particle size analyzer (PSA). The FTIR demonstrated that membrane fouling layer is governed by the deposition of organic and inorganic substances composed of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) (proteins, polysaccharides, etc.), hydrocarbon components and inorganic matters. The AFM images of the fouled membrane confirmed the idea of surface coverage as a fouling mechanism. The SEM analysis showed that rod-shape bacterial clusters were one of the contributors to membrane cake layer. The EDX and ICP results showed that Mg, Al, Ca, Na, K and Fe were the major metal elements in the fouling cake. The PSA results indicate that membrane foulants had a much smaller size than mixed liquor suspensions in the MSBR. Fouling mitigation experiments showed that the effect of organic flocculant was more than inorganic chemicals but the overall effects were not significant. Ultrasound could effectively remove the fouling cake from the membrane surface and thus recovered the membrane permeation flux for a long time. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

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