Mórahalom, Hungary
Mórahalom, Hungary

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Gallegos-Monterrosa R.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena | Maroti G.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Balint B.,Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd. | Kovacs A.T.,Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena
Genome Announcements | Year: 2016

Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain M5 is a potential hypoxanthine producer that was isolated from clay soil. Here, we present the draft genome sequence that was annotated in order to facilitate future studies of L. fusiformis M5. © 2016 Gallegos-Monterrosa et al.


Soki J.,University of Szeged | Hedberg M.,Umeå University | Patrick S.,Queen's University of Belfast | Balint B.,SeqOmics Biotechnology Ltd | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy | Year: 2016

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the antibiotic resistance profiles, antibiotic resistance mechanisms and possible 'clonal' nature of some MDR Bacteroides fragilis strains that simultaneously harboured cfiA, nimB, IS1186 and IS4351. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by Etests and antibiotic resistance genes and different genetic elements were detected by applying PCR methods. The environments of the cfiA and nimB genes were also determined by sequencing. The transferability of the cfiA, nimB and tet(Q) genes was tested by conjugation. The genetic relatedness of the test strains was tested by ERIC-PCR or PFGE. The complete genome sequences of two strains (B. fragilis BF8 and O:21) were determined by next-generation sequencing. Results: Most of the seven B. fragilis strains tested displayed multidrug resistance phenotypes; five strains were resistant to at least five types of antibiotics. Besides the common genetic constitution, ERIC-PCR implied high genetic relatedness. Similarities in some of the antibiotic resistance mechanisms [carbapenems (cfiA) and metronidazole (nimB)] also confirmed their common origin, but some other resistance mechanisms (MLSB [erm(F)] and tetracycline [tet(Q)]) and PFGE typing revealed differences. In B. fragilis BF8 and O:21, erm(F) and tet(X) genes were found with IS4351 borders, thus constituting Tn4351. All the strains were tet(Q) positive and transferred this gene in conjugation experiments, but not the cfiA and nimB genes. Conclusions: An international cluster of MDR B. fragilis strains has been identified and characterized. This 'clone' may have emerged early in the evolution of division II B. fragilis strains, which was suggested by the low-complexity ERIC profiles and differences in the PFGE patterns. © The Author 2016.


PubMed | Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Friedrich - Schiller University of Jena and Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genome announcements | Year: 2016

Lysinibacillus fusiformis strain M5 is a potential hypoxanthine producer that was isolated from clay soil. Here, we present the draft genome sequence that was annotated in order to facilitate future studies of L.fusiformis M5.


PubMed | Netherlands Cancer Institute, University Pierre and Marie Curie, Hanover Clinical Trial Center GmbH, VU University Amsterdam and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: British journal of cancer | Year: 2016

Cervical cancer (CC) remains a leading cause of gynaecological cancer-related mortality worldwide. CC pathogenesis is triggered when human papillomavirus (HPV) inserts into the genome, resulting in tumour suppressor gene inactivation and oncogene activation. Collecting tumour and blood samples is critical for identifying these genetic alterations.BIO-RAIDs is the first prospective molecular profiling clinical study to include a substantial biobanking effort that used uniform high-quality standards and control of samples. In this European Union (EU)-funded study, we identified the challenges that were impeding the effective implementation of such a systematic and comprehensive biobanking effort.The challenges included a lack of uniform international legal and ethical standards, complexities in clinical and molecular data management, and difficulties in determining the best technical platforms and data analysis techniques. Some difficulties were encountered by all investigators, while others affected only certain institutions, regions, or countries.The results of the BIO-RAIDs programme highlight the need to facilitate and standardise regulatory procedures, and we feel that there is also a need for international working groups that make recommendations to regulatory bodies, governmental funding agencies, and academic institutions to achieve a proficient biobanking programme throughout EU countries. This represents the first step in precision medicine.


PubMed | Szent Istvan University, Polytechnic University of Timişoara, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd.
Type: | Journal: Bioresource technology | Year: 2016

The steadily increase of global energy requirements has brought about a general agreement on the need for novel renewable and environmentally friendly energy sources and carriers. Among the alternatives to a fossil fuel-based economy, hydrogen gas is considered a game-changer. Certain methods of hydrogen production can utilize various low-priced industrial and agricultural wastes as substrate, thus coupling organic waste treatment with renewable energy generation. Among these approaches, different biological strategies have been investigated and successfully implemented in laboratory-scale systems. Although promising, several key aspects need further investigation in order to push these technologies towards large-scale industrial implementation. Some of the major scientific and technical bottlenecks will be discussed, along with possible solutions, including a thorough exploration of novel research combining microbial dark fermentation and algal photoheterotrophic degradation systems, integrated with wastewater treatment and metabolic by-products usage.


PubMed | Queen's University of Belfast, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, SeqOmics Biotechnology Ltd and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy | Year: 2016

The aim of this study was to examine the antibiotic resistance profiles, antibiotic resistance mechanisms and possible clonal nature of some MDR Bacteroides fragilis strains that simultaneously harboured cfiA, nimB, IS1186 and IS4351.Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by Etests and antibiotic resistance genes and different genetic elements were detected by applying PCR methods. The environments of the cfiA and nimB genes were also determined by sequencing. The transferability of the cfiA, nimB and tet(Q) genes was tested by conjugation. The genetic relatedness of the test strains was tested by ERIC-PCR or PFGE. The complete genome sequences of two strains (B. fragilis BF8 and O:21) were determined by next-generation sequencing.Most of the seven B. fragilis strains tested displayed multidrug resistance phenotypes; five strains were resistant to at least five types of antibiotics. Besides the common genetic constitution, ERIC-PCR implied high genetic relatedness. Similarities in some of the antibiotic resistance mechanisms [carbapenems (cfiA) and metronidazole (nimB)] also confirmed their common origin, but some other resistance mechanisms {MLSB [erm(F)] and tetracycline [tet(Q)]} and PFGE typing revealed differences. In B. fragilis BF8 and O:21, erm(F) and tet(X) genes were found with IS4351 borders, thus constituting Tn4351. All the strains were tet(Q) positive and transferred this gene in conjugation experiments, but not the cfiA and nimB genes.An international cluster of MDR B. fragilis strains has been identified and characterized. This clone may have emerged early in the evolution of division II B. fragilis strains, which was suggested by the low-complexity ERIC profiles and differences in the PFGE patterns.


Svab D.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Balint B.,Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd. | Maroti G.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Toth I.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Infection, Genetics and Evolution | Year: 2015

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and especially enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are important, highly virulent zoonotic and food-borne pathogens. The genes encoding their key virulence factors, the Shiga toxins, are distributed by converting bacteriophages, the Stx phages. In this study we isolated a new type of inducible Stx phage carrying the stx1 gene cluster from the prototypic EHEC O157:H7 Sakai strain. The phage showed Podoviridae morphology, and was capable of converting the E. coli K-12 MG1655 strain to Shiga toxin-producing phenotype. The majority of the phage genes originate from the stx2-encoding Sakai prophage Sp5, with major rearrangements in its genome. Beside certain minor recombinations, the genomic region originally containing the stx2 genes in Sp5 was replaced by a region containing six open reading frames from prophage Sp15 including stx1 genes. The rearranged genome, together with the carriage of stx1 genes, the morphology and the capability of lysogenic conversion represent a new type of recombinant Stx1 converting phage from the Sakai strain. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Tukacs-Hajos A.,GazInnov Ltd. | Pap B.,Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd. | Maroti G.,Hungarian Academy of Sciences | Szendefy J.,Biogaz Fejleszto Ltd. | And 2 more authors.
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2014

Anaerobe fermentation of sugar beet pressed pulp was investigated in pilot-scale digesters. Thermophilic adaptation of mesophilic culture was monitored using chemical analysis and metagenomic characterization of the sludge. Temperature adaptation was achieved by increasing the temperature gradually (2°Cday-1) and by greatly decreasing the OLR. During stable run, the OLR was increased gradually to 11.29kgVSm-3d-1 and biogas yield was 5% higher in the thermophilic reactor. VFA levels increased in the thermophilic reactor with increased OLR (acetic acid 646mgL-1, propionic acid 596mgL-1), then VFA decreased and the operation was manageable beside the relative high tVFA (1300-2000mgL-1). The effect of thermophilic adaptation on the microbial communities was studied using a sequencing-based metagenomic approach. Connections between physico-chemical parameters and populations of bacteria and methanogen archaea were revealed. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Hungarian Academy of Sciences and SeqOmics Biotechnology Ltd.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2016

Currently available tools for multiplex bacterial genome engineering are optimized for a few laboratory model strains, demand extensive prior modification of the host strain, and lead to the accumulation of numerous off-target modifications. Building on prior development of multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), our work addresses these problems in a single framework. Using a dominant-negative mutant protein of the methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) system, we achieved a transient suppression of DNA repair in Escherichia coli, which is necessary for efficient oligonucleotide integration. By integrating all necessary components into a broad-host vector, we developed a new workflow we term pORTMAGE. It allows efficient modification of multiple loci, without any observable off-target mutagenesis and prior modification of the host genome. Because of the conserved nature of the bacterial MMR system, pORTMAGE simultaneously allows genome editing and mutant library generation in other biotechnologically and clinically relevant bacterial species. Finally, we applied pORTMAGE to study a set of antibiotic resistance-conferring mutations in Salmonella enterica and E. coli. Despite over 100 million y of divergence between the two species, mutational effects remained generally conserved. In sum, a single transformation of a pORTMAGE plasmid allows bacterial species of interest to become an efficient host for genome engineering. These advances pave the way toward biotechnological and therapeutic applications. Finally, pORTMAGE allows systematic comparison of mutational effects and epistasis across a wide range of bacterial species.


PubMed | Hungarian Academy of Sciences and Seqomics Biotechnology Ltd.
Type: | Journal: Infection, genetics and evolution : journal of molecular epidemiology and evolutionary genetics in infectious diseases | Year: 2016

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7/NM strains are significant foodborne pathogens intensively studied, while other sero- and pathotypes of the O157 serogroup only began to receive more attention. Here we report the first genome sequence of a cytolethal distending toxin (CDT-V) producing E. coli O157:H43 strain (T22) isolated from cattle. The genome consists of a 4.9Mb chromosome assembled into three contigs and one plasmid of 82.4kb. Comparative genomic investigations conducted with the core genomes of representative E. coli strains in GenBank (n=62) confirmed the separation of T22 from the EHEC and enteropathogenic (EPEC) O157 lineages. Gene content based pangenome analysis revealed as many as 261 T22-specific coding sequences without orthologs in EDL933 EHEC O157 prototypic and two phylogenetically related commensal E. coli strains. The genome sequence revealed 10 prophage-like regions which harbor several virulence-associated genes including cdt and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-II) encoding operons. Our results indicate that the evolutionary path of T22 is largely independent from that of EHEC and EPEC O157:H7/NM strains. Thus, the CDT-producing T22 E. coli O157:H43 strain represents a unique lineage of E. coli O157.

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