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Stevenson R.L.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2012

HPLC 2012, the 38th International Symposium on High Performance Liquid Phase Separations and Related Techniques, CA, June 16-21, 2012, highlighted latest advances in chromatography technology and applications. A lecture reported on the performance of experimental columns packed with 1.1-μm core/shell particles. Dr. Andy Alpert, President of PolyLC, Columbia, MD, and the founder of HILIC and related ERLIC presented a sunrise tutorial on orthogonal selectivity to reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and improved detection sensitivity in LC-MS. Protocol for optimizing peak capacity for i.d. gradient elution separations of small molecules, starting with the restricted set of commercially available column dimensions, was also discussed. Two selective sorbents targeting phosphopeptides to improve MS detection and both were found to be effective in selective extraction of phosphopeptides.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

The 21st International Light Scattering Colloquium attracted about 90 scientists to the Four Seasons Biltmore Hotel Resort in Santa Barbara, CA, for an intense, two-day update on advances in analytics for the nanoworld, with a particular focus on light scattering technology. As in the past, the quality of the technical presentations was better than excellent. Some of the presentations are discussed in this article.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

At Pittcon ® 2011, most new products appeared to be evolutionary, not revolutionary. Possibly, the recession sapped money for innovation and hence fewer new products resulted. But the meeting was successful: The consensus of the vendors was uniformly positive about the buying interest of conferees. The quality of leads was rated as good to high. I heard two "best ever"s-all very positive signs for the industry. The recession was bad in general, but this industry segment has seen much worse, especially in the 1970s and '80s.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

Columns, chemicals, and consumables (CCCs) account for more than 30% of the chromatography market. The quantities are large. Globally, 400,000 active HPLCs produce two 100-car tanker trains of waste mobile phase per year. This cost nearly a billion dollars to buy and a similar number to dispose of. With an average of five columns/year, the number of columns is about two million. This seems low, since a few chromatographs run 24 × 7 and use hundreds of columns. Columns are a topic close to the heart of many chemists, since one can utilize one's chemical training to use and even improve them.


Stevenson R.L.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2012

Some of the steps and techniques that need to be followed for sample preparation for quantitative liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LCMS) are discussed. A number of such steps and techniques need to be followed for sample preparation the researchers as they need to work around the idiosyncrasies of the mass spectrometer and the sample. The emphasis is on SPE LC-MS of much smaller samples of biologicals from body fluids and tissue in the field of proteomics. Solid-phase extraction is also attractive for proteins and peptides, especially when bioaffinty ligands give high selectivity. The Perfinity Biosciences workstation from Shimadzu uses up to six trap and analysis columns to digest serum proteins to peptides in 10 minutes. The stationary phases include a variety of affinity chromatography columns including Perfinity G, Tetravidin, and Monoavidin.


Stevenson R.L.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2012

The 4th Automation User Group Meeting, held at the Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, CA, September 20-23, 2011, highlighted that proposed next-generation systems should share a common industrial design for the modules to improve layout and servicing. The evolution of genome sequencing at Broad was described by Ms. Sheila Fisher. Broad was one of the leaders in sequencing the human genome and follow-on genomes. Scott Fulton of BioSystem Development, Madison, WI, lectured on the AssayMAP™ Microchromatography Platform for sample prep using automated liquid handlers such as the Bravo. According to Hinnerk Boriss, Sovicell, Leipzig, Germany, estimating the unbound fraction of drug candidates is essential for predicting their pharmacodynamics. Sovicell developed the TRANSIL brain absorption assay for measuring the transport across a porcine lipid by layer.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

Automating the laboratory is driven by the desire to reduce costs and improve consistency in results by substituting mechanization for labor. At the very high end, high-content assay core facilities process hundreds of thousands to millions of wells per day. These facilities are optimized to screen very large compound libraries to discover lead drug candidates. The lower 90% of the laboratory automation market often follows up on the results of the massive screens by studying more focused sample sets ranging downward from about 10,000 wells/day. This midmarket was the focus of LabAutomation 2011, which attracted more than 4000 scientists, engineers, and vendors to the Palm Springs Convention Center for a short, intense exhibition and symposium from January 30 to February 2, 2011. From all appearances, this market segment is very robust, with a steady string of new products and technology.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

With each year, Cambridge Healthtech Institute's (CHI) Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference continues to expand. The 18th edition, held February 23-25 at the North Hall of San Francisco's Moscone Convention Center, increased the parallel tracks to 13. Attendance was up by 10%. Tracks included Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs), Informatics, Medicinal Chemistry, Translational Science, and Cancer Biologics. Of course, it would take a team of journalists to even begin to completely cover this multifaceted meeting, so you are getting only the highlights.


Stevenson R.L.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2013

Robert L. Stevenson, Separation Science Editor, talks about the changes and advances in the chemical industry envisioned by the American Laboratory magazine. For 45 years, articles in American Laboratory have chronicled each step in the evolution of modern instrumentation. Early data recording devices included strip chart recorders. The most sophisticated had multiple pens to monitor two detectors simultaneously. In the early 1970s, computers started to appear to directly capture data, distill them to meta data, and prepare reports via a teleprinter. At about the same time, digital integrators (DIs) came on the scene. These used derivative detection of peaks and valleys implemented with discrete transistors. In the late 1970s, the first microprocessors started to appear. Microprocessors were programmable and ideal for automating instrument function. The successful interfacing of HPLC to mass spectrometry is also one of the most significant advances in practical applications of instrumentation.


Stevenson R.,Separation Science for American Laboratory Labcompare
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

At Pittcon® in 2004, Waters (Milford, MA) introduced the ACQUITY UPLC® chromatograph with a 15,000-psi P max, and the rest of the LC world had to play an intense game of catch-up. This included creating fear, uncertainty, and doubt (FUD) by the competition as they struggled to respond. But, by the spring of 2010, each of the top seven vendors had introduced competitive instruments, some with a P max greater than 5,000 psi. Users responded that the benefi ts were real and often more valuable than expected. Many sales arguments were properly swept to the dust bin. So after seven years, let's see what UPLC has brought and what might be coming in the future.

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