Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Morningside, Australia

Bowen M.,Sentis
Society of Petroleum Engineers - 1st SPE African Health, Safety, Security and Environment and Social Responsibility Conference and Exhibition 2014 - Protecting People and the Environment: Getting it Right for the Development of the Oil and Gas Industry in Africa | Year: 2014

Traditional Behavioural Based safety systems have been implemented in organizations and industries across the globe, with some success. Yet across organizations safety performance has reached a plateau and in many cases incidents and injuries are again on the rise. A key part of the reason is that a purely behavioural approach to safety is based on an incomplete understanding of human psychology. To truly influence people and impact on the way people behave and engage with safety processes requires a deeper understanding of the motivations that drive our behaviour and more than that, an understanding of how to influence individuals and groups toward safety. This paper explores how current literature and research in the areas of cognitive psychology, social psychology, the psychology of change and neuroscience can add greatly to refining how we apply psychology to our safety systems, and go beyond the simple reward and punishment paradigm of behavioural based approaches. The presentation will shed light on what these theories mean for behavioural safety systems and provide safety leaders with insights to build an intrinsically motivated workforce who value safety. The use of psychological theories and concepts can provide a wealth of opportunity for improving safety performance and culture, if we move past a purely behavioural approach to one that embraces a more broad understanding of individual and group psychology. Copyright © 2014, Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


Web surveys are rapidly becoming standard issue in many researchers' toolkits; however, measurement error has been shown to affect web surveys to a greater extent than paper-and-pencil surveys (Couper, 2000; Manfreda & Vehovar, 2002). Principles of aesthetic design and social presence have been applied to web surveys to reduce the prevalence of such error with promising results, which were further investigated in this research. A sample of 181 first-year psychology undergraduate students participated in this study. Participants were randomly allocated to view one of eight web survey interfaces, which varied by aesthetic quality and social presence. Exploratory structural equation modeling using the partial least squares method revealed that classical aesthetic quality and social presence were both positively related to perceived ease of use of the web survey interface and positive state affect; social presence and perceived ease of use were positively related to trust in the web survey researcher; classical aesthetic quality was negatively related to negative state affect; and, expressive aesthetic quality was negatively related to perceived ease of use and positively related to positive state affect. Interestingly, expressive aesthetic quality was also positively related to negative state affect. These relationships between aesthetic quality and social presence should inform best practice web survey design recommendations, and future empirical work should extend and test the generalizability of these findings. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Bowen M.,Sentis
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE Americas E and P Health, Safety, Security, and Environmental Conference 2013 | Year: 2013

Traditional Behavioral Based safety systems have been implemented in organizations and industries across the globe, with some success. Yet across organizations safety performance has reached a plateau and in many cases incidents and injuries are again on the rise. A key part of the reason is that a purely behavioral approach to safety is based on an incomplete understanding of human psychology. To truly influence people and impact on the way people behave and engage with safety processes requires a deeper understanding of the motivations that drive our behaviour and more than that, an understanding of how to influence individuals and groups toward safety. This paper explores how current literature and research in the areas of cognitive psychology, social psychology, the psychology of change and neuroscience can add greatly to refining how we apply psychology to our safety systems, and go beyond the simple reward and punishment paradigm of behavioural based approaches. The presentation will shed light on what these theories mean for behavioral safety systems and provide safety leaders with insights to build an intrinsically motivated workforce who value safety. The use of psychological theories and concepts can provide a wealth of opportunity for improving safety performance and culture, if we move past a purely behavioral approach to one that embraces a more broad understanding of individual and group psychology. Copyright 2013, Society of Petroleum Engneers. Source


Bowen M.,Sentis
Society of Petroleum Engineers - SPE European HSE Conference and Exhibition 2013: Health, Safety, Environment and Social Responsibility in the Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Industry | Year: 2013

The current thinking in the field of workplace safety distinguishes between process safety and person safety (i.e., the human factors). In actuality, people and their attitudes and behaviours are critical for process safety. If a process safety initiative is conceptualised similarly to other organisational interventions, people play a significant role in determining the success of a process safety initiative. To illustrate this concept, this presentation demonstrates how applying key concepts from the disciplines of Organisational Psychology (e.g., change management), Social Psychology (e.g., team dynamics), and Neuroscience (e.g., thinking patterns and habits) can make process safety initiatives more effective. Process safety is an important piece of the workplace safety jigsaw puzzle. By integrating this piece with the people piece, the effectiveness of process safety initiatives can be improved. This presentation will challenge attendees' current assumptions about the role of people in process safety. Copyright 2013, Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


Casey T.W.,Sentis | Krauss A.D.,Sentis
Safety Science | Year: 2013

Despite advancements in the science and practice of safety, workers continue to experience injuries. Nowhere are these human costs more apparent than in countries such as South Africa, where the fatality rate for underground miners is well above that in developed countries. In an effort to further improve workplace safety, scholars and practitioners have sought to identify additional predictors of individual safety performance. Two concepts show considerable promise: error management climate and safety communication. This study sought to investigate the relationships between two understudied constructs in safety research: error management climate and safety communication. We found that organizational error management climate predicted co-worker and supervisor safety support, and safety behavior. In addition, co-worker safety support and safety communication exhibited particularly strong relationships with safety performance as compared to the influence of supervisor safety support and upwards safety communication. Theoretical and practical implications for error management and safety communication are discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations