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Singer M.,Semiconductor Devices | Oster D.,Israeli Ministry of Defense
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

Cryogenically cooled IR detectors, which are used in applications such as situational awareness, search & track, missile launch and approach warning, typically use wide angle, single field of view optical systems. We describe a complete IR imaging optical assembly for such applications, which is mounted inside a cold shield and is maintained at a stabilized cryogenic temperature inside the dewar. A typical system houses two to four lenses and a cold filter, and weighs 5 grams or less. Despite this integration and added complexity, the resulting Detector-Dewar-Cooler Assembly (DDCA) has overall dimensions similar to those of equivalent-performing DDCAs without integrated optics. Moreover, Compact designs integrating wide-angle optics and a warm, high-magnification, telescope module for narrow FOV applications are seen as a straightforward extension of our system. We conclude with an in-depth, technical overview describing the design considerations for a typical wide-field imaging system. © 2010 Copyright SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering.


News Article | December 23, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Joseph Federico, Vice President and Director of Operations at NJ MET, Inc. announced that NJ MET was awarded the 2016 Mid-Market Achievement Award in the area of Electronic Component Procurement and Testing by Corporate Vision Magazine. “We are very happy to be recognized in this way,” said Joseph Federico from their NJ laboratory headquarters. “We pride ourselves on the personal attention that we give to each client’s order.” The magazine supplement announcing the award winners can be found at http://issuu.com/aiglobalmedia/docs/cv_mid-market_achievement_awards/19?e=15629828/39434708 Corporate Vision created the awards to highlight the achievements of mid-market businesses because they felt that this segment of the business community is often overlooked. Award recipients are focused on quality and success. Information about the awards can be found on the CV Magazine website. http://www.corp-vis.com/2016-mid-market-achievement-awards NJ MET Inc. is AS9100 Rev. C/lS09001:2008 certified, and recently successfully completed the Defense Logistic Agency's (DLA) laboratory suitability assessment. They are now qualified to test Federal Stock Classes 5961 (Semiconductor Devices) and FSC 5962 (Microcircuits) to DLA's QTSL test requirements. NJ Met is also registered with GIDEP. SAE International, ERA, ASTM, ITAR, IEEE. and ANSI/ESD20.20. For nearly 40 years, NJ MET Inc. has been a pioneer in the Commercial, Military, Aerospace, Space, Industrial, Automotive and Medical fields providing worldwide quality electronic component procurement, screening and qualification testing of electronic component products. More information about NJ MET can be found on its website. http://www.njmetmtl.com. Please call Joseph Federico at 973 546-5393 for more information about range of testing and consulting services that NJ MET provides.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Joseph Federico Vice President and Director of Operations of NJ MET, Inc. announced that he will hold short discussions pertaining to “Issues in Authenticating Military Marked Components” at the Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages (DMSMS) 2016 Conference November 28 - December 1, 2016 at the Colorado Convention Center. NJ MET’s booth is # 901. "As exhibitors we are proud to educate our most valued customers as well as the industry attending this significant conference about new technology and advancements in electronic components for military, aerospace and space applications,” said Joseph Federico, NJ MET Director, from their laboratory headquarters in Clifton, NJ. An outline of the talk is available by clicking this link: http://njmetmtl.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/J-Federico-Issues-in-Authenticating-Military-Marked-Components-CMSE-2016.pdf For nearly 40 years, NJ MET Inc. has been a pioneer in the Commercial, Military, Aerospace, Space, Industrial, Automotive and Medical fields providing worldwide quality electronic component procurement, screening and qualification testing of electronic component products. NJ MET, Inc. is AS9100 Rev. C/ISO9001:2008 certified and recently successfully completed of The Defense Logistic Agency's (DLA) laboratory suitability assessment and are now qualified to test federal stock classes (FSC) 5961 (Semiconductor Devices) and FSC 5962 (Microcircuits) to DLA's QTSL test requirements. NJ MET, Inc. is also registered with GIDEP, SAE International, ERAI, ASTM, ITAR, IEEE, and ANSI/ESD20.20. Their employees have hands-on training in the Counterfeit Components Avoidance Workshop by The Components Technology Institute, Inc. and just celebrated 38 years of Laboratory Procurement and Testing Services. NJ MET, Inc. has an outstanding A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. Please call Joseph Federico, Vice President and Director of Operations, for more information about the DMSMS 2016 conference as well as NJ MET's electronic testing services at (973) 546-5393 or visit NJ MET's website at http://www.njmetmtl.com


CLIFTON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Joseph Federico, Vice President of NJ MET, Inc. announced the renewal of his membership with SAE International for a seventh year. SAE International is a U.S.-based, globally active, professional association and standards organization for engineering professionals in various industries. Principal emphasis is placed on transport industries such as automotive, aerospace, and commercial vehicles. Founded by automotive, automobile and aerospace giants such as Andrew L. Ricker, Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Glenn Martin, Orville Wright and Charles Kettering, the society coordinates the development of technical standards based on best practices identified and described by SAE committees and task forces. Task forces are composed of engineering professionals from relevant fields. SAE International has over 120,000 members globally. Membership is granted to individuals, not through companies. Aside from its standardization efforts, SAE International continues to devote resources to projects and programs in STEM education, professional certification, and collegiate design competitions. “I am happy to continue my participation for a seventh year in SAE’s testing, validation and certification management category, particularly with NJ MET’s interests in aerospace testing and counterfeit parts mitigation,” said NJ MET Vice President Joseph Federico from the company’s laboratory headquarters in NJ. He added, “We practice SAE’s AS5553 and AS6081 Counterfeit Risk Mitigation Testing Processes. We also share SAE International’s interest in furthering STEM education, including sponsoring our own STEM scholarship.” SAE publishes over 6,400 technical documents for the aerospace industry. These include Aerospace Standards (AS), Aerospace Recommended Practices (ARP), and Aerospace Information Reports (AIR). Aerospace Standards apply to missile, airframe, ground-support equipment, propulsion, propeller, and accessory equipment. Aerospace Material Standards are a subset of Aerospace Standards governing materials science and engineering for aerospace applications. Aerospace Recommended Practices are recommendations for engineering practice. Aerospace Information Reports contain general accepted engineering data and information. NJ MET has been a pioneer in the Commercial, Military, Aerospace, Industrial, Automotive and Medical fields providing worldwide quality electronic component procurement, screening and qualification testing of electronic component products for 38 years. An AS9100 Rev. C / ISO9001:2008 certified laboratory, NJ MET is also Defense Logistic Agency’s (DLA) laboratory suitable to test federal stock classes (FSC) 5961 (Semiconductor Devices) and FSC 5962 (Microcircuits) to DLA’s QTSL test requirements. NJ MET is also registered with GIDEP, SAE International, ERAI, ASTM, ITAR, IEEE, and ANSI/ESD20.20. Their employees have hands on training in the Counterfeit Components Avoidance Workshop by The Components Technology Institute. NJ MET has an outstanding A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau. For more information on the laboratory total quality system and SAE International participation, please call Joseph Federico at NJ MET , NJ (973) 546-5393 or visit their website at www.njmetmtl.com for more information about its testing services as well as its certifications and memberships. For more information on SAE International visit their website at http://www.sae.org/


Veprik A.,SemiConductor Devices | Tuito A.,Israel Ministry of Defense
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2016

Low size, weight, power and price split Stirling linear cryocooler usually comprises electro-dynamically driven compressor and pneumatically driven expander which are side-by-side fixedly mounted upon the common frame and interconnected by the configurable transfer line. Vibration export produced by such a cryocooler comprises of a pair of tonal forces, the frequency of which essentially equals fixed driving frequency. In vibration sensitive applications, this may result in excessive angular line of sight jitter and translational defocusing affecting the image quality. The authors present Multimodal Tuned Dynamic Absorber, having one translational and two tilting modes essentially tuned to the driving frequency. Dynamic analysis shows that the dynamic reactions (force and moment) produced by such a dynamic absorber are capable of simultaneous attenuation of translational and tilting components of cryocooler induced vibration. The authors reveal the preferable design, the method of fine tuning and outcomes of numerical simulation on attainable performance. © 2016 SPIE.


Klipstein P.C.,SemiConductor Devices
Journal of Crystal Growth | Year: 2015

XBnn and XBpp barrier detectors grown from III-V materials on GaSb substrates have recently been shown to exhibit a low diffusion limited dark current and a high quantum efficiency. Two important examples are InAsSb/AlSbAs based XBnn devices with a cut-off wavelength of λC~4.1 μm, and InAs/GaSb Type II superlattice (T2SL) based XBpp devices, with λC~9.5 μm. The former exhibit background limited performance (BLIP) at F/3 up to ~175 K, which is a much higher temperature than observed in standard generation-recombination limited devices, such as InSb photodiodes operating in the same Mid Wave IR atmospheric window. The Long Wave IR (LWIR) T2SL XBpp device has a BLIP temperature of ~100 K at F/2. Using the k · p and optical transfer matrix methods, full spectral response curves of both detectors can be predicted from a basic knowledge of the layer thicknesses and doping. The spectral response curves of LWIR gallium free InAs/InAs1-xSbx barrier devices have also been simulated. These devices appear to have a lower quantum efficiency than the equivalent InAs/GaSb XBpp devices. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Klipstein P.C.,Semiconductor Devices
Journal of Physics Condensed Matter | Year: 2016

A solution of the 4 × 4 k • p Hamiltonian for the quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge states in ideal semiconductor topological insulator (TI) quantum wells (QWs) was recently demonstrated by the author using standard boundary conditions for the wave function and its derivative, in order to address unphysical behavior associated with open boundary conditions (Klipstein 2015 Phys. Rev. B 91 035310). For HgTe/CdTe QWs which have strong s-p hybridization, there are two non-degenerate solutions in each spin direction with a finite amplitude at the edge, one of which was shown to be spurious. For the case of weakly hybridized InAs/GaSb/AlSb QWs, the solutions near the zone center are degenerate, and the question is now settled of which solution is spurious. The physical solutions for the ideal QW are then used as the basis for a perturbation treatment of the edge state dispersions in realistic QWs, where interface, bulk and structural asymmetries are also present. Interactions are included with more remote states than considered previously, as required for a consistent treatment of the TI bulk states, where a large difference exists in the spin splittings of the conduction and valence band edges. The asymmetry perturbations induce only minor changes to the edge state dispersions, which no longer merge smoothly with the bulk band extrema. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.


Klipstein P.C.,Semiconductor Devices
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2015

A solution of the k·p model is presented for bulk and quantum spin hall (QSH) edge states in semiconductor topological insulator (TI) quantum wells (QWs), bounded at the edge by an infinite wall potential. The edge states are exponentially localized, with a nonzero amplitude at the QW edge, and obey standard boundary conditions for the wave function and its derivative. Single helical edge states with spin locked to the direction of motion are found in the TI band gap (ETI) of QWs with both strong (HgTe/CdTe) and weak (InAs/GaSb/AlSb) s-p hybridization, but in the second case only below a small critical band gap, Ecrit∼1.6meV. For ETI>Ecrit, there appear to be two degenerate states for each spin direction. It is suggested that Z2-like topological properties can still be maintained if one of these states is spurious or suppressed by disorder. The effect of interface band mixing, and band mixing due to structural inversion asymmetry and bulk inversion asymmetry is also considered. Simple model Hamiltonians are developed for the bulk and edge states which are calibrated against a bulk eight-band k·p calculation close to the TI transition. At the transition, the zero gap bulk states exhibit a spin splitting, essentially changing the Dirac point to a circle. In the TI phase, there is a small change in the dispersion of the QSH edge states. These results confirm the robustness of the QSH edge states to spatial symmetry breaking interactions. © 2015 American Physical Society.


Klipstein P.C.,Semiconductor Devices
Physical Review B - Condensed Matter and Materials Physics | Year: 2010

A Kane-like envelope function Hamiltonian is derived for the Γ15 valence and Γ1 conduction states of lattice-matched, semiconductor superlattice structures, with metallurgically abrupt interfaces. The local microscopic potential is treated as a weak perturbation on that of a reference crystal and is expressed in terms of a one-dimensional profile function, G (z), which modulates the difference between the potentials of the well and barrier materials. In contrast to many previous treatments, all terms up to order "=2 in δ V̄ ( k̄ a )" are included, where δ V̄ is the typical band offset, k̄ is the average momentum modulus of the envelope function, and a is the bulk lattice parameter. Far from the interfaces, the Hamiltonian is identical to the familiar bulk Kane Hamiltonian, with the standard bulk parameters. However, the operator ordering in the valence band is revised from the commonly used Burt scheme. An operator ordering scheme has also been derived for the linear- k P terms that couple conduction and valence states. Expressions have been derived for the δ functionlike, and derivative of a δ functionlike, interface terms. These are off-diagonal and diagonal, respectively, in common atom superlattices like GaAs/ Alx Ga1-x As, where the antisymmetric contribution to G ′ (z) is expected to be small. For superlattices with no common atom, additional interface terms are introduced. If the difference in the spin-orbit splitting energy for the two superlattice materials is comparable with the valence-band offset, then relativistic corrections can introduce many more, weak interface contributions. Part of the relativistic interface matrix has been derived, which includes the most significant terms. Finally, a scheme is proposed for reducing the number of independent Luttinger parameters required, when using the Hamiltonian to fit experimental spectral data. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Klipstein P.,SemiConductor Devices
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2015

SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures, grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of detectors enables diffusion limited behavior with dark currents comparable with MCT Rule-07 and with high quantum efficiencies. InAsSb/AlSbAs based XBn focal plane array detectors with a cut-off wavelength of ∼ 4.1 μm and formats presently up to 1024×1280 / 15 μm, operate with background limited performance up to ∼175 K at F/3. They have a sensitivity and image quality comparable with those of standard InSb detectors working at 77K. In an XBp configuration, the same concept has been applied to an InAs/GaSb type II superlattice (T2SL) detector with a cut-off wavelength of ∼ 9.5 μm, which operates with background limited performance up to ∼100 K at F/2. In order to design our detectors effectively, a suite of simulation algorithms was developed based on the k<. p and optical transfer matrix methods. In a given T2SL detector, the complete spectral response curve can be predicted essentially from a knowledge of the InAs and GaSb layer widths in a single period of the superlattice. Gallium free T2SL detectors in which the GaSb layer is replaced with InAs1-xSbx (x ∼ 0.15-0.5) have also been simulated and the predicted spectral response compared for the two detector types. © 2015 SPIE.

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