Semican inc

Princeville, Canada

Semican inc

Princeville, Canada

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Yan W.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Pageau D.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Martin R.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 10 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2010

The oat (Avena sativa L.) breeding program at the Eastern Cereal and Oilseed Research Centre of Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada has the responsibility to breed new oat cultivars for producers in eastern Canada, which includes Ontario, Quebec, and the Atlantic provinces. A 3-yr multilocation test was conducted to understand the genotype × location interaction patterns and the relationships among test locations in eastern Canada. A genotype + genotype × environment interaction biplot analysis of yield data revealed three distinct oat mega-environments in eastern Canada: (i) northern Ontario, (ii) southern and eastern Ontario, and (iii) Quebec and Atlantic Canada. To breed for all mega-environments, initial yield screening must be conducted at locations representing each of these mega-environments. Based on the relationships among test locations, six essential test locations were identified: three in Ontario, two in Quebec, and one in Atlantic Canada. Testing at all six locations appeared to provide a good coverage of the whole oat-growing area in eastern Canada. Based on these findings, a breeding and test strategy was developed. This includes conducting initial yield screening at three locations in Ontario, Quebec, and Atlantic Canada, followed by a formal yield test at all six essential test locations. Specifically adapted genotypes selected from this test will then be tested in the Registration Tests in their respectively adapted subregions. © Crop Science Society of America.


Lanoie N.,Laval University | Vanasse A.,Laval University | Collin J.,Laval University | Reid J.F.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 3 more authors.
Crop Science | Year: 2010

Naked oat (Avena sativa L.) grown in Québec, Canada, produces an average of 10% covered grains. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of environment, herbicide, and genotype on the proportion of covered grains, to study the relation between the presence of awns and the proportion of covered grains, and to determine the location of covered grains on the plant (tiller) and on the panicle. Eight oat lines were evaluated over 2 yr at four experimental sites. Each line was treated with bromoxynil/ MCPA, dicamba/MCPA, or thifensulfuron methyl/ tribenuron methyl applied at Zadoks 12-13 and compared to a hand-weeded check. The highest percentages of covered grains, 5.5 and 6.9%, were found at different sites in 2006 and 2007. The application of dicamba/MCPA increased the percentage of covered grains in the lines normally producing a higher proportion of covered grains, but low producing lines were less affected. Minor differences were found among the other weed control treatments. No relation was found between the presence of awns and the proportion of naked grains. Covered grains were mostly produced on the main stem and their position on the panicle depended on genotype and weed control treatment. © Crop Science Society of America.


Lanoie N.,Laval University | Vanasse A.,Laval University | Collin J.,Laval University | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 3 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2010

Lanoie, N., Vanasse, A., Collin, J., Frégeau-Reid, J., Pageau, D., Lajeunesse, J. and Durand, J. 2010. Naked oat response to soil type and herbicides applied at two growing stages. Can. J. Plant Sci. 90: 247-255. Naked oat (Avena sativa L.) harvested in the province of Quebec, Canada, develops on average 10% covered grains and sometimes more. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of soil type, herbicides and their application stages on the proportion of covered grains in naked oat genotypes. Three genotypes were evaluated over 2 yr at two experimental sites. At each site, trials were seeded on two different soil types and each entry was treated with one of three types of herbicides: bromoxynil/MCPA, dicamba/MCPA and thifensulfuron methyl/tribenuron methyl, and compared with a weed-free check. The herbicides were applied at Zadoks 12-13 and 22-23. Results showed that dicamba/MCPA herbicide, applied at Zadoks 12-13, increased covered grains compared with the weed-free check and more covered grains were produced with the application made at Zadoks 22-23. However, differences in genotype reactions were observed. Few differences were found among the other weed control treatments. The application of dicamba/MCPA at Zadoks 22-23 decreased yield and test weight, but increased kernel weight. The other weed control treatments had no effect on agronomic characteristics.


Yan W.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Pageau D.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Durand J.,Semi Can Inc
Crop Science | Year: 2011

The success of a plant breeding program depends on many factors; one crucial factor is the selection of suitable breeding and testing locations. A test location must be discriminating so that genetic differences among genotypes can be easily observed, it must be representative of the target environments so that selected genotypes have the desired adaptation, and its representation of the target environment should also be repeatable so that genotypes selected in 1 yr will have superior performance in future years. Using the yield data of 2006 through 2010 Quebec Oat Registration and Recommendation Trials as an example, we presented a method to visualize the representativeness and repeatability of test locations based on a genotype main effect plus genotype × environment interaction (GGE) biplot. The repeatability of a test location could also be quantified by mean genetic correlations between years within the location. Based on representativeness and repeatability, four categories of test locations were classified and their usefulness in plant breeding discussed. © Crop Science Society of America.


Yan W.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Pageau D.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Fregeau-Reid J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | Lajeunesse J.,Agriculture and Agri Food Canada | And 3 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Plant Science | Year: 2011

The Quebec agricultural regions have traditionally been divided into three zones. Zone 1 includes the small, southern most regions in the Montreal plain, zone 3 includes the large, discontinuous northern regions spreading from the west to the east of the province, and zone 2 includes areas between zone 1 and zone 3. Genotypic main effect (G) plus genotype-by-environment interaction (GGE) biplot analysis of the yield data from the Quebec Oat Registration and Recommendation trials during 2006-2009 revealed that the Quebec oat-growing regions can be divided into two distinct mega-environments: the small zone 1 region and the much larger zone 2 plus zone 3 regions. Due to the large genotype by mega-environment interactions, cultivar evaluation and recommendation must be conducted specifically to each mega-environment. However, a zone 3 test location, La Pocatière, consistently behaved like a zone 1 location in terms of cultivar ranking. Therefore, La Pocatière cannot be used to represent the zone 3 region, and cultivar recommendation for the regions represented by this location should be based on data from this location plus the zone 1 locations. In addition, climatic and soil data were examined in an attempt to explain this observation. The methodology adopted in this work may be of value to similar studies for other crops and in other regions.


Trademark
Semican Inc. | Date: 2011-07-12

animal feed of oats without a shell.


Trademark
Semican Inc. | Date: 2011-09-13

Feed granola bars for horses.

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