Arlington, TX, United States
Arlington, TX, United States

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Yang H.,University of Texas at Arlington | Yang H.,Semerane, Inc. | Zhao D.,University of Texas at Arlington | Chuwongin S.,University of Texas at Arlington | And 7 more authors.
Nature Photonics | Year: 2012

The realization of silicon-based light sources has been the subject of a major research and development effort worldwide. Such sources may help make integrated photonic and electronic circuitry more cost-effective, with higher performance and greater energy efficiency. The hybrid approach, in which silicon is integrated with a III-V gain medium, is an attractive route in the development of silicon lasers because of its potential for high efficiency. Hybrid lasers with good performance have been reported that are fabricated by direct growth or direct wafer-bonding of the gain medium to silicon. Here, we report a membrane reflector surface-emitting laser on silicon that is based on multilayer semiconductor nanomembrane stacking and a stamp-assisted transfer-printing process. The optically pumped laser consists of a transferred III-V InGaAsP quantum-well heterostructure as the gain medium, which is sandwiched between two thin, single-layer silicon photonic-crystal Fano resonance membrane reflectors. We also demonstrate high-finesse single-or multiwavelength vertical laser cavities. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Shuai Y.,University of Texas at Arlington | Zhao D.,University of Texas at Arlington | Singh Chadha A.,University of Texas at Arlington | Seo J.-H.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | And 5 more authors.
Applied Physics Letters | Year: 2013

We present here ultra-compact high-Q Fano resonance filters with displaced lattices between two coupled photonic crystal slabs, fabricated with crystalline silicon nanomembrane transfer printing and aligned e-beam lithography techniques. Theoretically, with the control of lattice displacement between two coupled photonic crystal slabs layers, optical filter Q factors can approach 211 000 000 for the design considered here. Experimentally, Q factors up to 80 000 have been demonstrated for a filter design with target Q factor of 130 000. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.


Yang H.,University of Texas at Arlington | Yang H.,Semerane, Inc. | Zhao D.,University of Texas at Arlington | Seo J.-H.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | And 5 more authors.
IEEE Photonics Technology Letters | Year: 2012

We report here high-performance broadband membrane reflectors based on crystalline silicon nanomembrane photonic crystals. A modified polydimethylsiloxane stamp transfer technique is developed for transferring large-area silicon membranes to glass substrates. Polarization-independent broad reflectivity at 1550-nm wavelength band was obtained from Si membrane reflectors, on both silicon and glass substrates. The experimental results also agree well with simulation results. © 2011 IEEE.


Zhao D.,University of Texas at Arlington | Yang H.,University of Texas at Arlington | Yang H.,Semerane, Inc. | Chuwongin S.,University of Texas at Arlington | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Photonics Journal | Year: 2012

We present here the cavity design of distributed-Bragg-reflector-free ultracompact Fano-resonance photonic crystal membrane-reflector vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers on silicon, which consists of a III-V quantum-well active region sandwiched in between two single-layer Si membrane reflectors (MRs). The Si reflectors are designed to have peak reflection band around 1550 nm, with over 300-nm reflection band. The complete laser cavity resonance was determined, with considerations of unique phase and field distribution characteristics associated with these single-layer MRs. The confinement factor of the lasing mode is optimized around 6%, which enables low threshold lasing. © 2009-2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: Simultaneous sensing of light of multiple wavelengths can greatly enhance survivability, sustainability, and versatility by enabling unmanned reconnaissance and intelligent surveillance for both DoD and homeland security. The objective of this STTR Phase II proposal is to continue and complete the development of a new type of multi-color/band nanomembrane imaging sensor array system, based on vertically integrated crystalline semiconductor nanomembrane photodetectors and nanomembrane electronics. Such imaging system can have high resolution and high speed, with lightweight and long term reliability. The system can be integrated on both rigid and flexible substrate, for conformal and wearable imaging systems, with a much simplified material integration and assembly processes. In this program, Semerane Inc. will work closely with University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Texas at Arlington, on the low-temperature nanomembrane integration technology and new device configurations, based on the participating parties'earlier work on nanomembrane electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. It is expected that the successful development of the conformal, lightweight, and multi-color imaging system through this STTR project will generate significant impact on military and commercial imaging, sensing, and communication applications. BENEFIT: The mission of Semerane Inc. is to commercialize semiconductor nanomembrane for the realizations of high performance, low-cost photonic and electronic components and intelligent system integration. The successful development of the advanced multi-color imager system can offer a wide range of applications in the areas of hyper-spectral imaging (combat identification and target recognition), gas sensing (chem-bio detection and spectrometer-on-a-chip), as well as information processing (WDM-on-a-chip), etc. The relevant fabrication processes to be developed here would lead to an even broader area of applications, including high capacity, low cost data network, optical computing, flexible displays, solid-state lighting, energy harvest (multi-junction tandem photovoltaic cells), infrared night vision, image and gas sensing for medical, biological, environmental, military, and home land security applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: The simultaneous sensing of light of multiple wavelengths can enhance the survivability, sustainability, and versatility by enabling unmanned reconnaissance and intelligent surveillance for both DoD and homeland security. The objective of this STTR Phase I proposal is to investigate the feasibility of a new type of multi-color/band nanomembrane imaging sensor array system, based on vertically integrated crystalline semiconductor nanomembrane photodetectors and nanomembrane electronics. Such imaging system can have high resolution and high speed, with lightweight and long term reliability. The system can be integrated on both rigid and flexible substrate, for conformal and wearable imaging systems, with a much simplified material integration and assembly processes. In this program, Semerane Inc. will work closely with University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Texas at Arlington, on low-temperature nanomembrane integration technology and new device configurations, based on its earlier work in nanomembrane electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. It is expected that the successful development of the conformal, lightweight, and multi-color imaging system through this STTR project will generate significant impact on the military and commercial imaging, sensing, and communication applications. BENEFIT: The mission of Semerane Inc. is to commercialize the semiconductor nanomembrane technology for the commercial realizations of high performance, low-cost photonic and electronic components and intelligent system integration. The successful development of a practical multi-color imager system can offer a wide range of applications in the areas of hyper-spectral imaging (combat identification and target recognition), gas sensing (chem-bio detection and spectrometer-on-a-chip), as well as information processing (WDM-on-a-chip), etc. The processes developed here would lead to an even broader area of applications, including high capacity, low cost data network, optical computing, flexible displays, solid-state lighting, energy harvest (multi-junction tandem photovoltaic cells), infrared night vision, image and gas sensing for medical, biological, environmental, military, and home land security applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2011

ABSTRACT: The objective of this STTR Phase II proposal is to continue and complete the development of a commercially practical laser source on silicon (Si), with the demonstration of high performance ultra-compact electrically-pumped infrared laser prototype at 1550 nm band. Currently, silicon (Si)-based photonics are bottlenecked by the lack of an economical yet reliably integrated on-chip laser source. In this program, Semerane Inc. will work closely with University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Texas at Arlington to remove this most difficult bottleneck by developing the long demanded on-Si lasers, based on a low-temperature nanomembrane integration technology. The on-silicon infrared laser, namely membrane-reflector vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (MR-VCSEL), will exhibit high efficiency, ultra compactness (DBR-free), high reliability and wide spectral tunability. With the proposed laser structure to be directly built on Si, the highly desirable monolithic integration of the laser with Si CMOS will eventually be realized. The success of the proposed work will lead to the next-generation fully integrated electronics and photonics (EP) integrated circuits and will pave the way toward high-density 3D integrated EP systems. It is expected that the successful development of the on-Si laser through this STTR project will generate significant impact on the military and commercial communication and sensing applications. BENEFIT: The success of the development of economical yet reliable lasers on Si permits monolithic integration of sensing, spectroscopy, signal processing and computing all on a single chip. The single-chip photonics and electronics integration offers an affordable solution to the multi-functional platform with revolutionary influence in many areas of science, technology and everyday life. Such examples include high capacity low-cost data network, optical computing, flexible displays, solid state lighting, energy harvest, infrared night vision, image and gas sensing for medical, biological, environmental, military, and homeland security applications.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

The objective of this STTR Phase I proposal is to investigate the feasibility of a commercially practical laser source on silicon (Si). Currently, silicon (Si)-based photonics are bottlenecked by the lack of an economical yet reliably integrated on-chip laser source. In this program, Semerane Inc. will work closely with University of Wisconsin-Madison and University of Texas at Arlington to remove this most difficult bottleneck by developing the long demanded on-Si lasers, based on a low-temperature nanomembrane integration technology. The on-silicon infrared laser, namely membrane reflector VCSEL (MR-VCSEL), will exhibit high efficiency, ultra compactness (DBR-free), high reliability and wide spectral tunability. With the proposed laser structure to be directly built on Si, the highly desirable monolithic integration of the laser with Si CMOS will also be realized. The success of the proposed work will lead to the next-generation fully integrated electronics and photonics (EP) integrated circuits and will pave the way toward high-density 3D integrated EP systems. It is expected that the successful development of the on-Si laser through this STTR project will generate significant impact on the military and commercial communication and sensing applications. BENEFIT: The success of the development of economical yet reliable lasers on Si permits monolithic integration of sensing, spectroscopy, signal processing and computing all on a single chip. The single-chip photonics and electronics integration offers an affordable solution to the multi-functional platform with revolutionary influence in many areas of science, technology and everyday life. Such examples include high capacity low cost data network, optical computing, flexible displays, solid state lighting, energy harvest, infrared night vision, image and gas sensing for medical, biological, environmental, military, and home land security applications.


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop cost-effective high-performance flexible radio frequency (RF) electronics based on a crystalline nanomembrane roll-to-roll printing process. Such flexible electronic systems can concurrently demonstrate high speed (>5 GHz), high reliability and high conformability/flexibility, with much simplified, high-yield, and low-cost material integration and assembly processes. Continuous roll-to-roll printing processes, which are commonly used for polymer and amorphous silicon based flexible electronics manufacturing, will be developed for crystalline semiconductors, which are typically batch processed on rigid substrates for high-performance miniaturized electronics. The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to offer cost-effective, high-speed flexible/conformal electronics and integrated circuits at RF frequency, which are highly desirable for a wide range of market applications, including phased array antennas, conformal communication/surveillance systems, wearable electronics, high-performance flexible sensors, and high resolution/low power consumption flexible imaging/display systems. This technology is expected to bridge the gap between high-performance rigid electronics and low-cost flexible electronics, offering a unique product for high-speed flexible RF electronics. The roll-to-roll printing process will also enable scale-up production and manufacturing of crystalline semiconductor nanomembranes for cost-effective flexible RF electronics and photonics.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project aims to develop cost-effective high-performance flexible radio frequency (RF) electronics based on a crystalline nanomembrane roll-to-roll printing process. Such flexible electronic systems can concurrently demonstrate high speed (>5 GHz), high reliability and high conformability/flexibility, with much simplified, high-yield, and low-cost material integration and assembly processes. Continuous roll-to-roll printing processes, which are commonly used for polymer and amorphous silicon based flexible electronics manufacturing, will be developed for crystalline semiconductors, which are typically batch processed on rigid substrates for high-performance miniaturized electronics.

The broader/commercial impact of this project will be the potential to offer cost-effective, high-speed flexible/conformal electronics and integrated circuits at RF frequency, which are highly desirable for a wide range of market applications, including phased array antennas, conformal communication/surveillance systems, wearable electronics, high-performance flexible sensors, and high resolution/low power consumption flexible imaging/display systems. This technology is expected to bridge the gap between high-performance rigid electronics and low-cost flexible electronics, offering a unique product for high-speed flexible RF electronics. The roll-to-roll printing process will also enable scale-up production and manufacturing of crystalline semiconductor nanomembranes for cost-effective flexible RF electronics and photonics.

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