Semantic Identity

Brisbane, Australia

Semantic Identity

Brisbane, Australia

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Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Gajanayake R.,NICTA | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology
IRBM | Year: 2016

This paper provides a first look at the acceptance of Accountable-eHealth (AeH) systems-a new genre of eHealth systems designed to manage information privacy concerns that hinder the proliferation of eHealth. The underlying concept of AeH systems is appropriate use of information through after-the-fact accountability for intentional misuse of information by healthcare professionals. An online questionnaire survey was utilised for data collection from three educational institutions in Queensland, Australia. A total of 23 hypotheses relating to 9 constructs were tested using a structural equation modelling technique. The moderation effects on the hypotheses were also tested based on six moderation factors to understand their role on the designed research model. A total of 334 valid responses were received. The cohort consisted of medical, nursing and other health related students studying at various levels in both undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Hypothesis testing provided sufficient data to accept 7 hypotheses. The empirical research model developed was capable of predicting 47.3% of healthcare professionals' perceived intention to use AeH systems. All six moderation factors showed significant influence on the research model. A validation of this model with a wider survey cohort is recommended as a future study. © 2016 AGBM.


Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2014

In this paper, we present the results of a survey conducted to measure the attitudes of eHealth consumers towards Accountable-eHealth systems, which are designed for information privacy management. We developed a research model that identify the factors contributing to system acceptance from quantitative data of 187 completed survey responses from university students studying non-health-related courses at university (Queensland, Australia). The research model is validated using structural equation modeling and can be used to identify how specific characteristics of Accountable-eHealth systems would affect their overall acceptance by future eHealth consumers. © 2014 European Federation for Medical Informatics and IOS Press.


Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity
International Journal of E-Health and Medical Communications | Year: 2014

Information accountability is seen as a mode of usage control on the Web. Due to its many dimensions, information accountability has been expressed in various ways by computer scientists to address security and privacy in recent times. Information accountability is focused on how users participate in a system and the underlying policies that govern the participation. Healthcare is a domain in which the principles of information accountability can be utilised well. Modern health information systems are Internet based and the discipline is called eHealth. In this paper, the authors identify and discuss the goals of accountability systems and present the principles of information accountability. They characterise those principles in eHealth and discuss them contextually. They identify the current impediments to eHealth in terms of information privacy issues of eHealth consumers together with information usage requirements of healthcare providers and show how information accountability can be used in a healthcare context to address these needs. The challenges of implementing information accountability in eHealth are also discussed in terms of our efforts thus far. Copyright © 2014, IGI Global.


Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology
2014 IEEE 16th International Conference on e-Health Networking, Applications and Services, Healthcom 2014 | Year: 2015

This paper provides a first look at the acceptance of Accountable-eHealth systems, a new genre of eHealth systems, designed to manage information privacy concerns that hinder the proliferation of eHealth. The underlying concept of AeH systems is appropriate use of information through after-The-fact accountability for intentional misuse of information by healthcare professionals. An online questionnaire survey was utilised for data collection from three educational institutions in Queensland, Australia. A total of 23 hypothesis relating to 9 constructs were tested using a structural equation modelling technique. A total of 334 valid responses were received. The cohort consisted of medical, nursing and other health related students studying at various levels in both undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The hypothesis testing disproved 7 hypotheses. The empirical research model developed was capable of predicting 47.3% of healthcare professionals' perceived intention to use AeH systems. A validation of the model with a wider survey cohort would be useful to confirm the current findings. © 2014 IEEE.


Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology
IEEE Internet Computing | Year: 2011

Health information sharing has become a vital part of modern healthcare delivery. E-health technologies provide efficient and effective ways to share medical information, but they also raise issues over which medical professionals and consumers have no control. Information security and patient privacy are key impediments that hinder sharing data as sensitive as health information. Additionally, health information interoperability hinders the adoption of available e-health technologies. Here, the authors propose an information accountability solution combining the HL7 interoperability standard and social networks for manipulating personal health records. © 2011 IEEE.


Gajanayake R.,Queensland University of Technology | Gajanayake R.,NICTA | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity | Sahama T.,Queensland University of Technology
Electronic Journal of Health Informatics | Year: 2014

Security and privacy in electronic health record systems have been hindering the growth of e-health systems since their emergence. The development of policies that satisfy the security and privacy requirements of different stakeholders in healthcare has proven to be difficult. But, these requirements have to be met if the systems developed are to succeed in achieving their intended goals. Access control is a fundamental security barrier for securing data in healthcare information systems. In this paper we present an access control model for electronic health records. We address patient privacy requirements, confidentiality of private information and the need for flexible access for health professionals for electronic health records. We carefully combine three existing access control models and present a novel access control model for EHRs which satisfies requirements of electronic health records. © by the authors.


PubMed | Semantic Identity and Queensland University of Technology
Type: | Journal: Studies in health technology and informatics | Year: 2014

In this paper, we present the results of a survey conducted to measure the attitudes of eHealth consumers towards Accountable-eHealth systems, which are designed for information privacy management. We developed a research model that identify the factors contributing to system acceptance from quantitative data of 187 completed survey responses from university students studying non-health-related courses at university (Queensland, Australia). The research model is validated using structural equation modeling and can be used to identify how specific characteristics of Accountable-eHealth systems would affect their overall acceptance by future eHealth consumers.


Governatoria G.,NICTA | Iannella R.,Semantic Identity
Enterprise Information Systems | Year: 2011

Policy languages (such as privacy and rights) have had little impact on the wider community. Now that social networks have taken off, the need to revisit policy languages and realign them towards social networks requirements has become more apparent. One such language is explored as to its applicability to the social networks masses. We also argue that policy languages alone are not sufficient and thus they should be paired with reasoning mechanisms to provide precise and unambiguous execution models of the policies. To this end, we propose a computationally oriented model to represent, reason with and execute policies for social networks. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

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