Selex ES is an international electronics and information technology business, which is part of Finmeccanica S.p.A. It is based in Italy and the UK, and was formed in January 2013, following Finmeccanica's decision to combine its existing SELEX Galileo, SELEX Elsag and SELEX Sistemi Integrati businesses. It is organised into three divisions: Airborne and Space Systems, Land and Naval Systems, and Security and Smart Systems. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2007-1.2-02 | Award Amount: 23.54M | Year: 2009

The Integrated Mobile Security Kit (IMSK) project will combine technologies for area surveillance; checkpoint control; CBRNE detection and support for VIP protection into a mobile system for rapid deployment at venues and sites (hotels, sport/festival arenas, etc) which temporarily need enhanced security. The IMSK accepts input from a wide range of sensor modules, either legacy systems or new devices brought in for a specific occasion. Sensor data will be integrated through a (secure) communication module and a data management module and output to a command & control centre. IMSK will have an advanced man-machine interface using intuitive symbols and a simulation platform for training. End-users will define the overall system requirements, ensuring compatibility with pre-existing security systems and procedures. IMSK will be compatible with new sensors for threat detection and validation, including cameras (visual & infra-red); radar; acoustic and vibration; x-ray and gamma radiation and CBRNE. Tracking of goods, vehicles and individuals will enhance situational awareness, and personal integrity will be maintained by the use of, for example,. non-intrusive terahertz sensors. To ensure the use of appropriate technologies, police and counter-terrorist operatives from several EU nations have been involved in defining the project in relevant areas. Close cooperation with end-users will ensure compatibility with national requirements and appropriate interfaces with existing procedures. The effectiveness of IMSK will be verified through field trials. Through IMSK security of the citizen will be enhanced even in asymmetric situations.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: AAT.2012.3.5-2. | Award Amount: 30.50M | Year: 2013

Outstanding safety level of air transport is partly due to the two pilots standard. However situations where difficult flight conditions, system failures or cockpit crew incapacitation lead to peak workload conditions.The amount of information and actions to process may then exceed the crew capacity. Systems alleviating crew workload would improve safety. ACROSS Advanced Cockpit for Reduction of StreSs and workload - will develop new applications and HMI in a cockpit concept for all crew duties from gate to gate. Human factors, safety and certification will drive this approach. The new system will balance the crew capacity and the demand on crew resource. ACROSS workload gains will be assessed by pilots and experts. A Crew Monitoring environment will monitor physiological and behavioural parameters to assess workload and stress levels of pilots. A new indicator will consolidate flight situation and aircraft status into an indicator of the need for crew resource. If this need becomes higher than available crew resource, cockpit applications and systems will adapt to the new situation : a) Decision support: cockpit interfaces will adapt to focus crew on needed actions, b) Prioritisation: non-critical applications/information will be muted in favor of critical elements, c) Progressive automation: crew actions not directly relevant with the situation will be automated, d) Decision sharing: in case of persistent crisis situation, an automatic information link with the ground will be established to further assist the crew. In extreme situation where both pilots are incapacitated, further steps will be: a) Full automation: measures to maintain the aircraft on a safe trajectory, then reroute to nearest airport and autoland. b) Decision handling: mechanisms allowing ground crew to remotely fly the aircraft. ACROSS groups a large team of key European stakeholders. They are committed to deliver innovation in the field of air transport safety.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.4.2-2 | Award Amount: 11.69M | Year: 2011

The objective of PRACTICE project is to improve the preparedness and resilience of the EU member states and associated countries to an attack from a terrorist group using non conventional weapons such as CBRN (Chemical, Biological, Radiological and/or Nuclear agents) materials. The existing situation is characterized by a fragmented structure as regards technology, procedures, methods and organization on national level as well as EU-level. The project will be based on the development of a new toolbox focusing on 1) identification, organization and establishment of knowledge of critical elements in the event structure thorough studies of a wide selection of scenarios, real incidents and exercises and 2) analysis and identification of gaps in the current response situation and organization and integration of the allocated response capabilities or functions in a toolbox of equipment, procedures and methods and 3) an allocated system or kit for public information, decision-support, first-responder training and exercises. These response capabilities functions are to a great extent universal in character and independent of national organizational structures. The concept and developed system will therefore provide EU and member states with a flexible and integrated system for coordinated response to CBRN terrorist attack, which is easier to adapt to various national organizations and regulations. Particular attention will be given to integration and understanding of human factors and societal aspects in all the parts of the project. The final concept and integrated response system (toolbox) and subsystems will be tested and validated. A whole system demonstrator will be shown and tested in the final phases of the project.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 596.37K | Year: 2015

Vision is arguably the most important of our senses and our most direct channel of interaction with the surrounding world. It is no surprise therefore that so much of the technology that affects our everyday lives relies on light in one form or the other. The continuous strive to improve our light sources, ranging from lasers for research purposed to ambient lighting technologies is paralleled by a continuous increase in efforts to improve our imaging capabilities, ranging from artificial vision implants to hyperspectral imaging. An exciting and emerging imaging technology relies on the ability to detect remarkably low light signals, i.e. even single photons. This same technology, based for example of Single-Photon-Avalanche-Detectors (SPADs) comes hand in hand with another rather unexpected and also remarkable feature: incredibly high temporal resolution and the ability to distinguish events that are separated in time by picoseconds or less. This temporal resolution is obtained by operating the SPAD in so-called Time-Correlated-Single-Photon-Counting (TCSPC) mode, where the single photons are detected in coincidence with an external trigger and then electronically stored with a precise time-tag that, after accumulating over many events, allows to precisely identify the photon arrival time. These technologies are now relatively well established and are routinely employed in research activities, mainly associated to quantum optics measurements and time of flight measurements. However, these detectors are all single pixel detectors and thus do not allow to directly reconstruct an image in much the same way that a digital camera with a single pixel will not create an image. Workaround solutions have been adopted; for example a laser may be scanned across an object and the single pixel records intensity levels for each position of the laser beam. However, our obsession with the pixel-count in our latest digital camera clearly explains the paradigm shift in going from a single pixel detector to a multi-pixel detector and eventually to high resolution imaging. ULTRA-IMAGE aims at demonstrating a series of applications of very novel SPAD technology: for the first time these detectors are available in imaging arrays. This is an emerging technology that will represent the next revolution in imaging and we will have first hand access to each technological breakthrough in SPAD array design, as they occur over the next few years. We are currently employing 32x32 SPAD arrays and will be using the first ever (at the time of writing) 320x240 pixel array, which is able to deliver the first high quality spatially resolved images. The remarkable aspect of these detectors is that they still retain their picosecond temporal resolution therefore enabling a series of game-changing and remarkable technological applications that are not even conceivable with traditional cameras. As examples of the potential of this new imaging technology, we will utilise our SPAD cameras to visualise the propagation of light and perform time-of-flight detection of remote objects in harsh environments (the FEMTO-camera), to enable of the real-time tracking of objects hidden from view (the CORNER-camera), and to perform the first quantum measurements using low-rep rate, high-power lasers (the QUANTUM-camera). The solutions we will develop are enabled by four key features: first, the single-photon sensitivity of silicon detectors; second, the spatial resolution provided by the arrayed nature of the detectors; third, the precise picosecond and femtosecond timing resolution; and fourth, the ultra low-noise performance of gated detection.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2010.4.2-3 | Award Amount: 15.53M | Year: 2012

The AIRBEAM project proposes a situation awareness toolbox for the management of crisis over wide area taking benefit of an optimised set of aerial (unmanned) platforms, including satellites. The number of unmanned air- and space-borne platform available and their associated sensors present a new set of challenges to end users involved in the effective management of emergencies and actions of law enforcement. Within the scope of crisis management, the project intends to provide official public users from each Member States with the means to specify their own needs and to assess the technical solutions provided by unmanned aerial platforms. Through intense collaboration between industrial partners, stakeholders and end users, AIRBEAM will define an ambitious yet realistic concept of use. By running scenarios that will be properly selected and defined by the end-users within the project in a simulated environment, the increased capabilities for situation awareness will be assessed methodically. Various platform and sensor mixes will be compared using key performance indicators among which is cost effectiveness. Live demonstrations with multiple civil unmanned aerial platforms will complete these ground simulation exercises in demonstrating to end users the potential and maturity of the coordinated use of multiple platforms.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2011.2.2-02 | Award Amount: 2.84M | Year: 2011

The main goal of this project is the creation of a European supply chain for state-of-the art CMOS imagers. As identified by both ESA and the EC, there is a need for such a supply chain for CMOS imagers for space applications which uses solely European (and hence ITAR-free) sources. This goal will be realized using the proposed consortium as all partners have excellent know-how and track record in the expertise fields required. A second goal of the project is to push the performance of CMOS imagers and match the requirements for the (typically very demanding) space applications. Hence large area (much larger than commercial imagers) high sensitivity imagers will be developed using stitching technology and backside thinning. A key element here is the backside passivation process using laser annealing. The outcome of this project is a CMOS imager design and manufacturing platform that can be used by the space industry (ESA, CNES, satellite manufacturers, ... ) for their future space imager needs. However, it will as well serve (and will be open for) other high-end imager needs in e.g. medical or security applications.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2013

Sensors have for a long time played a vital role in battle awareness for all our armed forces, ranging from advanced imaging technologies, such as radar and sonar to acoustic and the electronic surveillance. Sensors are the eyes and ears of the military providing tactical information and assisting in the identification and assessment of threats. Integral in achieving these goals is signal processing. Indeed, through modern signal processing we have seen the basic radar transformed into a highly sophisticated sensing system with waveform agility and adaptive beam patterns, capable of high resolution imaging, and the detection and discrimination of multiple moving targets. Today, the modern defence world aspires to a network of interconnected sensors providing persistent and wide area surveillance of scenes of interest. This requires the collection, dissemination and fusion of data from a range of sensors of widely varying complexity and scale - from satellite imaging to mobile phones. In order to achieve such interconnected sensing, and to avoid the dangers of data overload, it is necessary to re-examine the full signal processing chain from sensor to final decision. The need to reconcile the use of more computationally demanding algorithms and the potential massive increase in data with fundamental resource limitations, both in terms of computation and bandwidth, provides new mathematical and computational challenges. This has led in recent years to the exploration of a number of new techniques, such as, compressed sensing, adaptive sensor management and distributed processing techniques to minimize the amount of data that is acquired or transmitted through the sensor network while maximizing its relevance. While there have been a number of targeted research programs to explore these new ideas, such as the USs Integrated Sensing and Processing program and their Analog to Information program, this field is still generally in its infancy. This project will study the processing of multi-sensor systems in a coherent programme of work, from efficient sampling, through distributed data processing and fusion, to efficient implementations. Underpinning all this work, we will investigate the significant issues with implementing complex algorithms on small, lighter and lower power computing platforms. Exemplar challenges will be used throughout the project covering all major sensing domains - Radar/radio frequency, Sonar/acoustics, and electro-optics/infrared - to demonstrate the performance of the innovations we develop.


Patent
SELEX Galileo | Date: 2012-10-18

An infrared detector system is described in which a despeckle filter is applied to image data generated by a High Operating Temperature (HOT) detector array. The filter reads the data associated with each pixel of the image generated and compares it with selected neighbouring pixels. The comparison yields a series of values that are compared to predetermined thresholds and the pixel is scored according to the number of values that exceed the threshold set. The score assigned to the pixel then determines the treatment of the pixel in the image to be generated. The data value of the pixel may be ignored, included or substituted with an alternative calculated value.


An avionics switched full-duplex Ethernet communication Arinc 664p7 network (100) includes at least two independent elementary networks (N1, N2). Each elementary network includes one or more end systems (ESI) suitable to act as source end systems for data frames transmitted over the network, and one or more end systems (ES4) suitable to act as destination end systems for such data frames. Each elementary network further includes a switching function block (SW1, SW2) connected between the source (ESI) and destination (ES4) end systems. The Ethernet network is has one of the source (ESI), destination (ES4) end systems and the switching function block (SW1, SW2) includes timers (204) suitable to generate a common piece of timing information to be sent to the other devices of the elementary network in-order to enable the transmission of the data frames over the elementary network by one of the source end systems (ESI).


Patent
SELEX Galileo | Date: 2015-12-22

A method of forming infra red detector arrays is described, starting with the manufacture of a wafer. The wafer is formed from a GaAs or GaAs/Si substrate having CMT deposited thereon by MOVPE. The CMT deposited comprises a number of layers of differing composition, the composition being controlled during the MOVPE process and being dependent on the thickness of the layer deposited. Other layers are positioned between the active CMT layers and the substrate. A CdTe buffer layer aids the deposition of the CMT on the substrate and an etch stop layer is also provided. Once the wafer is formed, the buffer layer, the etch stop layer and all intervening layers are etched away leaving a wafer suitable for further processing into an infra red detector.

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