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Kawamoto R.,Ehime University | Tabara Y.,Ehime University | Kohara K.,Ehime University | Miki T.,Ehime University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis | Year: 2010

Aim: Serum high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin improves insulin sensitivity, and a decreased level of serum HMW adiponectin has been reported as a risk factor for the development of diabetes and coronary heart disease. This association may be further confounded by the alcohol drinking status, which is involved in the development of liver dysfunction. The aim of this study was to determine whether the alcohol drinking status is associated with serum HMW adiponectin levels in community-dwelling Japanese men. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in 2002. Study participants without a clinical history of diabetes (747 men aged 60±14 (mean±standard deviation) (range, 20-89) years) were randomly recruited from a single community at the time of their annual health examination. They were classified into never drinkers, light drinkers (<1 unit/day), moderate drinkers (1-1.9 units/day), and heavy drinkers (≥2 units/day). We examined the effects of alcohol consumption on serum HMW adiponectin. Results: Overall, mean serum HMW adiponectin levels were significantly lower in the group with higher alcohol consumption, and there were inter-group differences in the alcohol drinking status. Moreover, age-adjusted mean serum HMW adiponectin levels were significantly lower in the group with higher alcohol consumption. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the alcohol drinking status was significantly and independently associated with serum adiponectin as well as age, smoking status, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C, serum ALT, and HOMA-IR. Multivariate-adjusted mean serum HMW adiponectin levels were also significantly lower in the group with higher alcohol consumption. Conclusion: The alcohol drinking status is negatively associated with serum HMW adiponectin levels in Japanese community-dwelling men.


Kawamoto R.,Ehime University | Tabara Y.,Ehime University | Kohara K.,Ehime University | Miki T.,Ehime University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis | Year: 2010

Aim: Serum high molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin improves insulin sensitivity, and a decreased level has been reported as a risk factor for the development of diabetes and coronary heart disease. This association may be further confounded by smoking, which is involved in the development of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to determine whether smoking status is associated with serum HMW adiponectin levels in community-dwelling males. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out in 2002. Study participants without a clinical history of diabetes (724 men aged 60±14 (mean±standard deviation) (range, 20-89) years) were randomly recruited from a single community at an annual physical examination. They were classified into never-smokers, ex-smokers, light-smokers (<30 pack • year), and heavy-smokers (≥30 pack • year). Results: Mean serum HMW adiponectin levels were significantly lower in the current smokers than in the never- and ex-smokers but showed no significant difference between the light and heavy-smok-ers. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that smoking status was significantly associated with HMW adiponectin levels, as were age, BMI, alcohol consumption, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Multivariate-adjusted mean serum HMW adiponectin levels were lowest in the heavy-smokers, and significantly decreased in heavy-smokers compared with never-smokers and ex-smokers of an age ≥60 years, BMI ≥22 kg/m2, alcohol consumption ≥22.9 g of ethanol/day, and HOMA-IR ≥1.6. Conclusion: Smoking status is associated with serum HMW adiponectin levels in community-dwell-ing Japanese men.


Kawamoto R.,Ehime University | Kohara K.,Ehime University | Katoh T.,Seiyo Municipal Nomura Hospital | Katoh T.,Ehime University | And 5 more authors.
Hypertension Research | Year: 2014

Central blood pressure (BP) has been shown to strongly associate with cardiovascular disease and outcome. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between changes in body size by exercise training and peripheral BP; however, the effect on changes in central BP is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in body size are independently related to changes in central BP in the elderly. The subjects were 11 men (mean age, 68±6 years) and 84 women (68±7 years) from a rural village. Before and at the end of the 12-week training program, metabolic variables, and first peak radial systolic BP (SBP1) and second peak radial SBP (SBP2) as estimates of central SBP, were obtained. Radial augmentation index (AI) was calculated as follows: ((SBP2-diastolic BP (DBP))/(SBP1-DBP)) × 100 (%) and we used AI corrected at heart rate 75 per min (AI@75). After the 12-week training program, weight loss correlated strongly with reduction in brachial mean arterial pressure (MAP), radial SBP1, SBP2 and AI@75. After adjusting for confounding factors, weight loss was significantly and independently associated with each reduction in brachial MAP (β=0.34, P=0.001), radial SBP1 (β=0.31, P=0.002), SBP2 (β=0.37, P<0.001) and AI@75 (β=0.36, P=0.001). These findings suggest that weight loss by a 12-week training program may be an effective strategy to improve central BP parameters among Japanese elderly persons. © 2014 The Japanese Society of Hypertension All rights reserved.


Kawamoto R.,Ehime University | Tabara Y.,Ehime University | Kohara K.,Ehime University | Miki T.,Ehime University | And 5 more authors.
Cardiovascular Diabetology | Year: 2011

Background: High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an acute phase reactant and a sensitive marker of inflammation. Hyperglycemia can potentially promote the production of CRP. The aim of this study was to determine whether increased fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels are associated with elevated hsCRP concentrations by gender.Methods: We recruited 822 men (mean age, 61 ± 14 years) and 1,097 women (63 ± 12 years) during their annual health examination from a single community. We cross-sectionally examined whether FPG levels are associated with hsCRP concentrations, and whether this association is independent of gender, body mass index (BMI) and other components of the metabolic syndrome.Results: In women only, hsCRP increased significantly and progressively with increasing FPG (r = 0.169, P < 0.001). The stepwise multiple linear regression analysis using hsCRP as an objective variable, adjusted for confounding factors as explanatory variables, showed that FPG as well as age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), uric acid, and high molecular weight adiponectin were significantly associated with hsCRP in women, but not in men. There was significant gender interaction, and an increase in hsCRP levels that was greater in women with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2and higher FPG than in men.Conclusions: These results suggested that hsCRP levels increase continuously across the FPG spectrum starting from the lowest FPG in both men and women. However, increase in hsCRP levels was greater in women than men. © 2011 Kawamoto et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Kawamoto R.,Ehime University | Tabara Y.,Ehime University | Kohara K.,Ehime University | Miki T.,Ehime University | And 5 more authors.
Lipids in Health and Disease | Year: 2011

Background: There are few studies to demonstrate the associations between newly addressed lipid profiles and metabolic syndrome (MetS)-associated variables. Methods. Study participants without medications for hypertension, diabetes, or dyslipidemia {614 men aged 58 14 (mean standard deviation; range, 20-89) years and 779 women aged 60 12 (range, 21-88) years} were randomly recruited from a single community at the time of their annual health examination. The association between lipid profiles (total cholesterol (T-C), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), non-HDL-C, T-C/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and MetS, Insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and serum HMW adiponectin were analyzed. Results: In multiple linear regression analysis, TG/HDL-C and T-C/HDL-C ratios as well as TG showed significantly strong associations with all three MetS-associated variables in both men and women. In men, the ROC curve analyses showed that the best marker for these variables was TG/HDL-C ratio, with the AUC for presence of MetS (AUC, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.77-0.87), HOMA-IR (AUC, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.70-0.80), and serum HMW adiponectin (AUC, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.63-0.71), respectively. The T-C/HDL-C ratio, TG, HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and non-HDL-C also discriminated these markers; however all their AUC estimates were lower than TG/HDL-C ratio. These results were similar in women. Conclusion: In Japanese community-dwelling adults, lipid ratios of TG/HDL-C, T-C/HDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C as well as TG and HDL-C were consistently associated with MetS, insulin resistance and serum HMW adiponectin. Lipid ratios may be used as reliable markers. © 2011 Kawamoto et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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