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Hamada R.,Seirei Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine | Muto S.,Seirei Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine | Muto S.,Dokkyo Medical University | Otsuka N.,Seirei Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Internal Medicine | Year: 2011

Objective We aimed to clarify the prevalence of preexisting Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) defined by the Japanese original criteria among patients with non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI). Methods This is a retrospective cohort study using the computer database obtained by the preliminary health checkup from April 2003 to December 2008. We extracted the subjects with newly developed nonfatal MI from the study population. The newly non-fatal MI was diagnosed by the history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and new appearance of abnormal Q wave on electrocardiograms. MetS was diagnosed by using the Japanese original criteria. If waist circumference was not available, BMI was used alternatively. We evaluated the prevalence of preexisting MetS and other risk factors of CHD among the subjects. We compared the prevalence of preexisting risk factors between MetS group and non-MetS group. Results From a study population of 298,455 subjects, 446 subjects with a history of CHD were found. Among the 446, 92 subjects (85 men and 7 women) with abnormal Q wave on electrocardiogram were found. The prevalence of preexisting MetS with non-fatal MI was 19.6% (95% CI; 15.5-23.7%). The prevalence of other preexisting risk factors were 60.0% with smoking history, 55.6% with over-work, 53.3% with stressful life and 36.1% with impaired glucose tolerance. These prevalence rates were not significantly different between MetS group and non-MetS group. Only the prevalence (22.3%) of elevated LDL-cholesterol in the non-MetS group was significantly higher than in the MetS group (14.4%). Conclusion Preexisting MetS may be able to predict only 20% of future MI. To prevent future myocardial infarction, precaution guidance may be required for people with not only preexisting MetS but also other preexisting risk factors of CHD. © 2011 The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine. Source


Haruyama Y.,Dokkyo Medical University | Muto T.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Tokyo Kasei-Gakuin University | And 8 more authors.
Industrial Health | Year: 2010

To elucidate the subjective thermal strain of workers in kitchen working environments, we performed a cross-sectional study involving 991 workers in 126 kitchen facilities in Japan, using a self-reporting questionnaire survey and subjective judgment scales (SJS). The ambient temperature, mean radiant temperature (MRT), and wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index were measured in 10 kitchen facilities of the 126 kitchens. The association of SJS with the types of kitchen was estimated by multiple logistic regression models. Of the 991 kitchen workers, 809 (81%) responded to the questionnaire survey. Compared with the electric kitchens, the proportion of workers who perceived the room temperature as hot to very hot was significantly higher, and the ambient temperature, MRT, and WBGT were significantly higher in the gas kitchens. Compared with the electric kitchens, workers in gas kitchens had a more than fivefold (males) and tenfold (females) higher SJS adjusted for confounding factors (male odds ratio (OR), 5.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.65-15.9; and female OR, 10.9; 95%CI, 3.89-30.5). Although SJS was affected by some confounding factors, our results suggest that workers in gas kitchens might be exposed to a higher heat strains than those in electric kitchens. Source


Tomita S.,Dokkyo Medical University | Muto T.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Kanagawa Institute of Technology | And 8 more authors.
Industrial Health | Year: 2013

This study investigated risk factors for frequent work-related burn and cut injuries and low back pain (LBP) among kitchen workers including personal, work-related and environmental factors. Subjects were 991 kitchen workers in 103 schools, 17 hospitals and nursing homes, and 6 restaurants in central Japan. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using a structured selfadministered questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between frequent injuries/LBP and risk factors. The effective response rate was 75.1% (n=744), the mean age was 40.7 (SD 11.7) and 77.2% were female. Burn injury was associated with a smaller kitchen (OR 1.94; 95%CI, 1.13-3.33), and gas kitchens rather than electric kitchens (OR 2.30; 95%CI, 1.17-4.52). LBP was associated with female gender (OR 2.46; 95%CI, 1.37-4.43), high body height (>160 cm) (OR 2.03; 95%CI, 1.22-3.36), and large number of meals produced per person (≥150 meals) (OR 1.83; 95%CI, 1.12-3.00). The results of this study suggest that securing adequate work space and introducing electric kitchen systems may reduce the risk to kitchen workers, as well as the importance of adequate height of cooking equipment and selecting an appropriate volume of meals to produce per person to prevent LBP in kitchen workers. ©2013 National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Source


Uchino A.,Seirei Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine | Muto T.,Dokkyo Medical University | Muto S.,Seirei Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine | Muto S.,Dokkyo Medical University
Industrial Health | Year: 2010

The objective of this study was to clarify the status of occupational health and safety services for immigrant workers, the barriers to employing immigrant workers and the needs of the managers in workplaces to keep immigrant workers healthy and safe. This study was a crosssectional survey. We sent self-administered questionnaires to 126 workplaces in the western part of Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan in August 2006. The questionnaire included the characteristics of the workplace, barriers to employing immigrant workers, current actions to keep immigrant workers healthy and safe, the implementation rate of health checkups and important issues to keep immigrant workers healthy and safe. Implementation rates of health and safety education, creating job instruction manuals written in their native languages, creating safety signs written in their native languages, and the use of translators were 62.5%, 50.0%, 41.1% and 37.5%, respectively. Implementation rates of general health checkups, special health checkups and follow up after health checkups were 80.8%, 73.6% and 67.3%, respectively. The most important issue which the managers considered kept immigrant workers healthy and safe was health checkups (69.6%). In conclusion, several occupational health and safety services were conducted for immigrant workers without a margin to compare with Japanese workers. Source


Haruyama Y.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Dokkyo Medical University | Matsuzuki H.,Kanagawa Institute of Technology | Tomita S.,Dokkyo Medical University | And 4 more authors.
Industrial Health | Year: 2014

To clarify the correlation between kitchen work-related burns and cuts and job stress, a self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted involving 991 kitchen workers among 126 kitchen facilities. The demographics, condition of burns and cuts, job stress with the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ), health condition, and work-related and environmental factors were surveyed. Multiple logistic regression models and trend tests were used according to quartiles (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) of each sub-scale BJSQ. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, burns/cuts were associated with a higher score category (Q4) of job demands (OR: 2.56, 95% CI: 1.10-6.02/OR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.30-5.69), psychological stress (OR: 4.49, 95% CI: 2.05-9.81/OR: 3.52, 95% CI: 1.84-6.72), and physical stress (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.20-4.98/OR 2.16, 95% CI: 1.16-4.01). The ORs of the burn/cut injures increased from Q1 to Q4 with job demands (p for trend = 0.045/0.003), psychological stress (p for trend<0.001/0.001), and physical stress (p for trend = 0.006/0.005), respectively. These fndings suggest that kitchen work-related burns and cuts are more likely to be correlated with job stress, and the higher the job stress score, the higher the frequency of burns and cuts among kitchen workers. © 2014 National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Source

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