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News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Following the priorities of UH's Vision 2010 strategic plan, UH publically launched Discover the Difference: The Campaign for University Hospitals in 2010 with a goal of $1 billion. After community support far surpassed expectations, in 2012 the goal was increased to $1.5 billion. UH is the second health system in the country, and the only in Ohio, to accomplish such an ambitious campaign goal. The campaign has enabled, enhanced and expanded clinical care programs, new endowed funds, and capital projects, including those identified in the Vision 2010 strategic plan: Ahuja Medical Center; Seidman Cancer Center; Center for Emergency Medicine and Marcy R. Horvitz Pediatric Emergency Center; and the Quentin & Elisabeth Alexander Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. UH established and grew the Harrington Heart & Vascular Institute, as well as Harrington Discover Institute – part of the Harrington Project for Discovery & Development – which supports 75 Harrington Scholars, created 10 new companies and licensed three drug discoveries to pharmaceutical companies. UH is home to the largest number of research studies in the state, with more than 1,200 ongoing clinical trials. The Angie Fowler Adolescent & Young Adult Cancer Institute at Rainbow became the first of its kind in the country, uniquely specialized in caring for patients between 12-30 years of age. Campaign support created vital programs like the Goodman Discovery Center and Coleman Clinical Trials Center, both at Seidman Cancer Center; Barbara Ruhlman Center for Women & Newborns at MacDonald Women's Hospital; and the Hampson Mole Community Health Project at Elyria Medical Center. More than 1,000 new philanthropic funds have been established, benefiting every department and institute in the health system. UH now has 93 endowed chairs, 74 of which were created during the Discover the Difference campaign, to retain, recruit and recognize the most preeminent physicians. "We are grateful to our many friends and supporters who share our belief in the mission of University Hospitals: To Heal. To Teach. To Discover." says Sherri Bishop, Chief Development Officer, UH. "The extraordinary giving spirit of our community has changed countless lives and will impact Northeast Ohio for generations." Shelly Adelman, Chair of the Board Development Committee, and Monte Ahuja and Jack Breen, campaign co-chairs, guided the vision for Discover the Difference. With their leadership the campaign achieved unprecedented results and UH reached thousands of new donors – nearly 90 percent of whom were first-time supporters of the health system. The following visionary supporters have generously supported UH with gifts of $10 million or more. Today, more than 4,700 UH providers care for more than 1 million patients at 11 community medical centers, three joint-venture hospitals and more than 40 health centers across 15 counties. University Hospitals will open its newest facility, the UH Rainbow Center for Women & Children, in Cleveland's MidTown neighborhood. Opening in Spring 2018, the Center will improve access to quality health care and social services for families in Cleveland and surrounding communities. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/university-hospitals-exceeds-campaign-goal-of-15-billion-300457198.html


PubMed | Boston University, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Beihang University, Case Western Reserve University and Seidman Cancer Center
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

To identify computer extracted imaging features for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI that are correlated with the low and high OncotypeDX risk categories. We collected 96 ER-positive breast lesions with low (< 18, N = 55) and high (> 30, N = 41) OncotypeDX recurrence scores. Each lesion was quantitatively characterize via 6 shape features, 3 pharmacokinetics, 4 enhancement kinetics, 4 intensity kinetics, 148 textural kinetics, 5 dynamic histogram of oriented gradient (DHoG), and 6 dynamic local binary pattern (DLBP) features. The extracted features were evaluated by a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier in terms of their ability to distinguish low and high OncotypeDX risk categories. Classification performance was evaluated by area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (Az). The DHoG and DLBP achieved Az values of 0.84 and 0.80, respectively. The 6 top features identified via feature selection were subsequently combined with the LDA classifier to yield an Az of 0.87. The correlation analysis showed that DHoG ( = 0.85, P < 0.001) and DLBP ( = 0.83, P < 0.01) were significantly associated with the low and high risk classifications from the OncotypeDX assay. Our results indicated that computer extracted texture features of DCE-MRI were highly correlated with the high and low OncotypeDX risk categories for ER-positive cancers.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new investigational delivery method for localized vaginal estrogen therapy that utilizes an applicator free softgel to alleviate moderate-to-severe vaginal pain during intercourse (dyspareunia), a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA), received high rates of patient satisfaction among post-menopausal women, according to post-trial survey results published in the journal Menopause. "These survey results show that something as simple as a change to a more elegant delivery system that is easier to use and not messy might empower more post-menopausal women to seek prescription treatment for VVA, and perhaps help them stay with the application guidelines for longer," said study first author Sheryl Kingsberg, PhD, Division Chief, OB/GYN Behavioral Medicine, UH Cleveland Medical Center; Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine; and first author of the survey analysis. "We still have to find better ways to educate the millions of women suffering with VVA about the symptoms, however, so that more of them know it is common, decide to discuss treatment with their healthcare professional, and seek symptom relief with appropriate treatment." The new results were part of a multi-center randomized, placebo-controlled phase 3 clinical trial for TX004HR, an investigational bio-identical 17β-estradiol applicator free vaginal softgel capsule. Previous publications have shown TX004HR to be safe and effective at alleviating symptoms of VVA. The survey, which included 731 respondents with a 96 percent response rate, sought to quantify participants' satisfaction with the application method and overall treatment delivery system. The majority of women taking either TX004HR or placebo (85.4 - 92.1 percent) found the product easy to use. VVA is a chronic condition associated with genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). VVA affects 50 to 70 percent of post-menopausal women, and is characterized by pain with sexual activity, dryness, and discomfort. Current on-the-market treatments for VVA include both over-the-counter creams and moisturizers as well as several safe and effective prescription treatments in cream, tablet, ring or oral form. Previous survey research completed by Dr. Kingsberg and others has shown that while 32 million women may be experiencing symptomatic VVA and suffering from related impacts on sexual function, interpersonal relationships, self-esteem and overall quality of life, only 7 percent are currently using a prescription therapy to alleviate symptoms. Though they may suffer from physical and emotional pain as a result of VVA, women may not feel comfortable discussing these symptoms with a healthcare professional, may not recognize the symptoms as treatable, may not fully understand the treatment options available, or if they did receive treatment, found the current prescription treatment options inconvenient, messy, or uncomfortable to use. Financial disclosure: Dr. Kingsberg has served as a consultant for TherapeuticsMD, the manufacturer of TX004HR, as well as Acerus Pharmaceuticals, AMAG Pharmaceuticals, Bayer Healthcare, Emotional Brain, Materna, Novo Nordisk, Nuelle, Palatin Technologies, Pfizer, Sermonix Pharmaceuticals, Shionogi Inc. and Valeant Pharmaceuticals. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org.


PubMed | Yale Cancer Center, Yale University, University of Connecticut, Michigan State University and Seidman Cancer Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Breast cancer research and treatment | Year: 2016

Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N=154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200mg) and Vitamin D (400IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29ng/mL range at the LS (p=0.01), hip (p=0.03), and GT (p=0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy.


CLEVELAND: Researchers from University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine presented significant new research findings in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic disorders at the 58th Annual Meeting of American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego. "The breadth and depth of this innovative cancer research presented at ASH is truly outstanding," says Stan Gerson, MD, Director of UH Seidman Cancer Center and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve. "Our faculty members are making tremendous advances in multiple myeloma, lymphoma and other hematologic malignancies which is reflected in their being selected for oral and poster presentations." Major advances have been made in treating multiple myeloma (MM) over the last 12 years and early phase clinical trials have played a key role in this progress according to an oral presentation (Abstract #1146) by Ehsan Malek, MD, of UH Seidman Cancer Center. Phase I trials, in addition to moving progress forward for new treatments, also have demonstrated therapeutic success for patients and are well tolerated. Dr. Malek and a team of researchers analyzed data from 2,408 MM patients who participated in 74 phase I clinical trials from 2004-2015 to determine the overall benefit and risks for patients. The analysis indicated that "the therapeutic benefit for patients recruited onto MM phase I trials was significantly higher than that reported for phase I trials of all cancer types." The team further found that patients' response rates supported earlier patient entry onto these early phase trials. "Multiple myeloma has seen tremendous progress over the past 12 years with the advent of new agents and survival rates have more than doubled," says Dr. Malek, Instructor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. "However in spite of advancements there still is an unmet need for drug discovery and phase I trials are critical to continued progress. Our research shows that these trials provide therapeutic benefit for patients who participate. Also these new therapies can be more beneficial the earlier patients enroll and no longer need to be thought of as a last resort." A team of researchers also presented an oral abstract (Abstract #105) finding that obese and older patients with a common form of lymphoma are more likely to develop heart disease following treatment. The researchers conducted a retrospective analysis of more than 400 patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) to determine the incidence of heart failure, heart attack, stroke and other cardiovascular events. They linked patients over age 60 and those with body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 with poorer outcomes and an elevated incidence of cardiovascular events. "Identification of patients at high risk for cardiovascular events is key to helping prevent complications after treatment and increasing long-term survival," says Paolo Caimi, MD, of UH Seidman Cancer Center and senior author of the study. "While further studies are needed, these findings provide important guidance on stratifying who is at risk and how to best tailor treatment. For patients who have advanced age or higher BMI, we can provide increased monitoring and identify ways to reduce their risk such as medications and other preventative measures." Dr. Malek and a team also presented a poster session (Abstract #1862) on the efficacy of a newly identified prognostic tool for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. The researchers analyzed a ratio of white blood cells in 337 MM patients and found that those with a higher ALC (absolute lymphocyte count) /AMC (absolute monocyte count) at diagnosis had longer survival. "This biomarker is linked with the strength of a patient's immune system," says Dr. Malek. "Based on these new findings, we may be able to predict who will respond better and tailor immunologic therapies for patients for optimum response." Dr. Caimi's team also had two other related posters which used the same patient cohort to further determine risk stratification in DBCL patients. In Abstract #3611, they showed that patients who experienced venous thrombotic events after diagnosis had poorer outcomes and also validated a method to identify patients at risk of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs). In Abstract #1863, the researchers found that DBCL patients older than 75 have a higher mortality risk following diagnosis. These patients respond equally well to treatment but have additional risk for complications such as heart attacks and blood clots. "These studies in total provide us with important new information on how to modify treatments for certain patients," says Dr. Caimi, who is also Assistant Professor at the School of Medicine. "For lymphoma patients at risk for clotting and those over age 75, we are better able to provide targeted therapies to improve long-term outcomes." Abstract #105 Cardiovascular Toxicity after Therapy for Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Occurs Early and Results in Decreased Overall Survival. Saturday, December 3, 2016: 10:00 AM https:/ Authors: Sabarish Ram Ayyappan, MBBS, Akiva Diamond, MD, Vinita Gupta, MD, Brenda Cooper, MD, Ben Tomlinson, MD, Ehsan Malek, MD, Leland Metheny, MD, Hillard Lazarus, MD, Stanton Gerson, MD, Marcos De Lima, MD and Dr. Caimi. Abstract #1862 Immunologic Status Evaluated By the Absolute Lymphocyte/Monocyte Ratio Provides a Powerful Prognostic Tool for Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma Saturday, December 3, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM https:/ Authors: Dr. Malek,Talib Dosani, MD, Raisa Pinto, MD, Fahrettin Covut, MD, Hugo Akabane, MD, James J. Driscoll, MD, PhD, and Marcos De Lima, MD. Abstract #3611 Venous Thromboembolic Events in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Patients: Risk Factors and Outcomes Sunday, December 4, 2016, 6:00 - 8:00 PM https:/ Authors: Sabarish Ram Ayyappan, MBBS, Vinita Gupta, MD, Akiva Diamond, MD, Brenda Cooper, MD, Ben K. Tomlinson, MD, Ehsan Malek, MD, Leland Metheny, MD, Hillard Lazarus, MD, Stanton Gerson, MD, Marcos De Lima, MD, and Paolo F. Caimi, MD. Abstract #1863 Treatment of Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Patients Older Than 75 Years: Higher Mortality and Risk of Complications without Increased Risk of Relapse after Treatment Saturday, December 3, 2016, 5:30 - 7:30 PM https:/ Authors: Akiva Diamond, MD, Sabarish Ram Ayyappan, MBBS, Raisa Pinto, MD, Ehsan Malek, MD, Ben K. Tomlinson, MD, Leland Metheny, MD, Brenda Cooper, MD, Stanton Gerson, MD, Hillard Lazarus, MD, Marcos De Lima, MD and Paolo F. Caimi, MD. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CLEVELAND: The Cornea Society has awarded Jonathan Lass, MD, the Castroviejo Medal, its highest honor. Dr. Lass, an ophthalmologist at University Hospitals Eye Institute at UH Cleveland Medical Center and Charles I Thomas Professor of Ophthalmology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine receives the award in recognition of his lifetime contributions to research and advancements in corneal transplant and surgery. "Dr. Lass has made a significant impact in our field and how we assess controversies in corneal surgery. He has been instrumental in the development, implementation and interpretation of numerous multicenter trials that have moved the field of corneal transplantation forward," said Cornea Society President Marian S. Macsai, MD, in a Cornea Society press release announcing the award. "Dr. Lass has standardized the way we review specular microscopy through the development of the Cornea Image Analysis Reading Center (CIARC) and as a result improved our evaluation of corneal endothelial cells. Dr. Lass was paramount in the success of the Cornea Donor Study and the Cornea Preservation Time Study. The Board of Directors of the Cornea Society unanimously chose Dr. Lass as the 2017 recipient of the Castroviejo Medal." The Castroviejo Medal is named in honor of Ramon Castroviejo, the father of modern corneal transplant surgery and the inspiration for the founding of the Cornea Society. It is awarded annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the field of cornea and anterior segment surgery. The recipient is invited to deliver the prestigious keynote lecture at the Cornea Society Annual Meeting in the fall. Dr. Lass is a nationally recognized specialist in corneal diseases and corneal transplantation. He directs the UH Cornea Image Analysis Reading Center, one of the top cornea image analysis centers in the country. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 publications, and coordinated many multi-institutional trials to add to the body of knowledge about eye donation and cornea viability. Dr. Lass is the former Chair of Ophthalmology at UH Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He served as one of the study leads on the National Eye Institute (NEI) sponsored Cornea Donor Study, the first masked, randomized, controlled study to demonstrate that donor age has no impact on the success of the transplant for 80 percent of recipients, eliminating a common bias against corneas from older donors. Currently, he serves as the principal investigator on an NEI-sponsored national multi-center, masked, randomized trial to determine the optimal time frame for usage of donated corneas, the Cornea Preservation Time Study. He attributes his recognition in the field to the outstanding teams involved in this work. "Our dedicated team at University Hospitals and Case Western Reserve University, as well as the clinical investigation teams around the country are doing the real and important work of these trials: Asking the important questions about eye banking and corneal transplantation," he said. Dr. Lass earned his MD from Boston University School of Medicine in Boston and completed an ophthalmology residency at Boston Medical Center. He completed a fellowship in cornea and external diseases at Harvard's Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Schepens Eye Research Institute. Dr. Lass has been recognized by several other national organizations, including as the recipient of the Senior Honor Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology in 2004 and the prestigious R. Townley Paton award from the Eye Bank Association of America in 2012--the highest honor for a corneal surgeon, from the other leading cornea organization in the United States. Dr. Lass is one of only 12 people in the field to ever receive both the Castroviejo Medal and the Paton award since the Castroviejo medal was established by the Cornea Society in 1975. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. Founded in 1843, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is the largest medical research institution in Ohio and is among the nation's top medical schools for research funding from the National Institutes of Health. The School of Medicine is recognized throughout the international medical community for outstanding achievements in teaching. The School's innovative and pioneering Western Reserve2 curriculum interweaves four themes--research and scholarship, clinical mastery, leadership, and civic professionalism--to prepare students for the practice of evidence-based medicine in the rapidly changing health care environment of the 21st century. Nine Nobel Laureates have been affiliated with the School of Medicine. Annually, the School of Medicine trains more than 800 MD and MD/PhD students and ranks in the top 25 among U.S. research-oriented medical schools as designated by U.S. News & World Report's "Guide to Graduate Education." The School of Medicine is affiliated with University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, MetroHealth Medical Center, the Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Cleveland Clinic, with which it established the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University in 2002. case.edu/medicine.


New Agreement Focuses on Improved System Efficiency at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center DUBLIN and CLEVELAND - Nov. 29, 2016 - Medtronic plc (NYSE:MDT), the global leader in medical technology, today announced the signing of its first Integrated Health Solutions agreement in the United States with University Hospitals (UH), one of the nation's leading healthcare systems, designed to improve delivery of care and patient experience. Together the organizations will implement innovative operational models that will optimize workflow and redefine operational efficiency for catheterization (cath) and electrophysiology (EP) laboratories at the University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.  Medtronic brings its international expertise from managing cath labs and operating rooms for over 100 hospital systems around the globe to manage clinical support operations in UH select labs. The agreement signals the expansion of Medtronic's managed services offering to U.S. health systems. Hospitals systems continue to find that operational efficiency is a prerequisite for clinical excellence. UH expects to optimize its operations with Medtronic involvement to continue to deliver excellent care and better manage rising healthcare costs. "Our collaboration with Medtronic gives us a unique opportunity to learn from their international best practices in inventory management and scheduling optimization," said Jeffrey Peters, M.D., UH chief operating officer. "We are excited to embed their expertise into our clinical operations, allowing our clinical staff to focus on providing the highest level of cardiovascular care for our patients." In cath labs and EP labs, clinical-support operations - lab management, scheduling, materials management, room turnover and process optimization - play a vital role in ensuring cardiologists are able to identify and diagnose cardiovascular conditions for their patients. The patient journey starts before the patient enters the hospital and continues after discharge. Addressing the needs of patients throughout the continuum of care is a priority of new models of care delivery. "Our Integrated Health Solutions business was formed as part of a commitment to advance healthcare delivery in more cost-effective ways," said Mike Genau, senior vice president and president, Americas Region, for Medtronic. "Our goal in collaborating with UH is to enhance patient care and system efficiency through the unique combination of operational insights, data, medical technology, and services. Medtronic has more than 65 years of experience to bring to the table, and we intend to be a close associate in implementing innovative solutions along the way." Medtronic plc (www.medtronic.com), headquartered in Dublin, Ireland, is among the world's largest medical technology, services and solutions companies - alleviating pain, restoring health and extending life for millions of people around the world. Medtronic employs more than 88,000 people worldwide, serving physicians, hospitals and patients in approximately 160 countries. The company is focused on collaborating with stakeholders around the world to take healthcare Further, Together. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org. Any forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties such as those described in Medtronic's periodic reports on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Actual results may differ materially from anticipated results.


CLEVELAND: A researcher from University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center will discuss his upcoming immunotherapy clinical trial for triple-negative breast cancer at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. The annual symposium is the premier meeting for more than 7,500 physicians and scientists dedicated to breast cancer treatment, featuring state-of-the-art breast cancer research such as experimental biology, etiology, prevention, diagnosis, and therapy of both breast cancer and premalignant breast disease. Joseph Baar, MD, PhD, Director of Breast Cancer Research at UH Seidman Cancer Center and Associate Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, will share details about a phase II clinical trial testing the effectiveness of combining the chemotherapy drugs carboplatin and nab-paclitaxel with an immunotherapeutic agent called pembrolizumab (Keytruda) for use in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. Dr. Baar's poster presentation will be part of the Ongoing Trials-Targeted Therapy session on December 8, 2016 from 5 pm to 7 pm. "Up until now, women with triple-negative breast cancer have only had one treatment option, which is chemotherapy. However, more recently, we've seen that the immune modulator pembrolizumab improves outcomes in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer," said Dr. Baar. "As a result, it is now critical to explore how the addition of pembrolizumab to chemotherapy might improve survival in patients with this type of breast cancer." Triple-negative breast cancer is a highly aggressive form which comprises 10-15 percent of newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer. Most triple-negative tumors are high grade and have a high incidence of recurrence and metastases (spreading to other organs). Unlike other types of breast cancer, there is no standard follow-up treatment for triple-negative breast cancer to prevent recurrence. As triple-negative breast cancer progresses, tumor cells express a protein ligand called PD-L1, which interacts with the PD-1 receptor on T-cells. T-cells are the immune system's primary mechanism for fighting back against harmful foreign invaders. The PD-L1 to PD-1 interaction prevents the T-cell from responding to the tumor as a threat. Pembrolizumab binds to the T-cell's PD-1 receptors and therefore blocks the PD-1 to PD-L1 interaction, allowing the T-cells to be activated against the tumor cells. The research team hypothesizes that the addition of such an immunotherapeutic agent to chemotherapy will allow the body's natural immune response to reduce disease recurrence to a greater extent than either modality alone. This is the first phase II trial to study the effectiveness of combining these two chemotherapeutic agents with the immunotherapeutic agent pembrolizumab for this type of cancer. The trial will enroll approximately 30 patients beginning in early 2017. Eligible patients must have radiologically measurable and documented metastatic triple negative breast cancer, be mostly functional day to day as measured by an ECOG performance status of between zero and one, must not have received more than two prior therapies for this disease, and must be willing to undergo a preliminary biopsy for research purposes. The trial is sponsored by Merck, which produces pembrolizumab as Keytruda. "Trials our faculty members present at SABCS and other research meetings around the world illustrate the remarkable advances in oncology taking place today," says Neal J. Meropol, MD, Chief, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Associate Director for Clinical Research, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center at Case Western Reserve. The symposium takes place December 6-10, 2016, and is hosted by The Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, the American Association for Cancer Research, and Baylor College of Medicine. Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org.


News Article | December 4, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CLEVELAND: Researchers from the Angie Fowler Adolescent & Young Adult Cancer Institute at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital (UH Rainbow) will present data focused on improving clinical outcomes for pediatric hematologic disorders at the 58th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH). The meeting, held from December 3 to 6, 2016, in San Diego, California, gathers a global community of more than 20,000 hematologists to share education and research on the most pressing topics in hematology. Ashish Gupta, MBBS, MPH, a pediatric hematology fellow at UH Rainbow, will share results from one of the largest quality controlled retrospective studies of children with acquired aplastic anemia. The data makes a compelling case for the pediatric hematology community to revisit the current treatment algorithm for this rare disease. Known as an "orphan" disease due to the low incidence of occurrence, pediatric acquired aplastic anemia affects approximately 2 to 4 children out of every million each year. The small population makes robust outcomes research difficult to come by. Dr. Gupta and colleagues collected 10 years' worth of data about more than 5,000 children with acquired aplastic anemia from the quality-controlled Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS) database to analyze the effectiveness of the current treatment algorithm and compare it to the effectiveness of newer therapeutic approaches. The PHIS database includes data from 45 U.S. children's hospitals. "Today, if a child with aplastic anemia has a matched related donor, we recommend proceeding with bone marrow transplant," said Dr. Gupta. "If no such optimum donor exists, as is true for almost 80 percent of children, immunosuppressive therapy (IST) is the standard of care, despite high rates of disease recurrence following treatment conclusion. As the outcomes of matched unrelated donor transplant options have improved, we wanted to know if patients with aplastic anemia were also experiencing better long term outcomes compared to immunosuppressive therapy, which is known to have high failure rates. Incidence of complications with bone marrow transplant also increases with delay in transplant." Through extensive data analysis, the research team found that outcomes were comparable between matched related bone marrow transplant and matched unrelated donor transplants. Interestingly, common post-transplant complications such as graft versus host disease or graft failure were actually lower for patients who underwent a transplant from a matched unrelated donor. "Children particularly tolerate transplants better than adults," added Dr. Gupta. "It is reasonable to recommend matched unrelated donor transplants in place of IST if a suitable donor is available." Dr. Gupta's presentation appears as part of the ASH Poster Session (Abstract 2395) entitled Outcomes Research-Non-Malignant Conditions. Another UH Rainbow presenter, Irina Pateva, MD, pediatric hematology/oncology at UH Rainbow and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, will present findings in red blood cell transfusions for critically ill children as part of the Basic Science and Clinical Practice in Blood Transfusion Poster Session. Additionally, UH Seidman Cancer Center physicians will present data on five additional clinical research topics in adult hematology and oncology. "ASH is one of the premier meetings for all hematologists," said Jignesh Dalal, MD, Director, Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant at UH Rainbow and Professor of Pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "The pediatric hematology team at UH Rainbow is world-class and focused on improving outcomes for all children. Selection to present at this meeting reflects this fact and will greatly enhance the body of knowledge we use to care for children around the world." 2395 Hematopoeitic Stem Cell Transplant in Aplastic Anemia: Is It Time to Revise the Treatment Algorithm Ashish O. Gupta, MBBS, MPH Session: 903. Outcomes Research--Non-Malignant Conditions: Poster I Saturday, December 3, 2016, 5:30 PM-7:30 PM Hall GH (San Diego Convention Center) 3851 Effect of Red Blood Cell Transfusions on Clinical Outcomes in Critically Ill Children Irina B. Pateva, MD Session: 401. Basic Science and Clinical Practice in Blood Transfusion: Poster III Monday, December 5, 2016, 6:00 PM-8:00 PM Hall GH (San Diego Convention Center) Founded in 1866, University Hospitals serves the needs of over 1 million patients per year through an integrated network of 18 hospitals, more than 40 outpatient health centers and 200 physician offices in 15 counties throughout northern Ohio. The system's flagship academic medical center, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, located on a 35-acre campus in Cleveland's University Circle, is affiliated with Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The main campus also includes University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, ranked among the top children's hospitals in the nation; University Hospitals MacDonald Women's Hospital, Ohio's only hospital for women; and University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, part of the NCI-designated Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. UH is home to some of the most prestigious clinical and research programs in the nation, including cancer, pediatrics, women's health, orthopedics, radiology, neuroscience, cardiology and cardiovascular surgery, digestive health, dermatology, transplantation and urology. UH Cleveland Medical Center is perennially among the highest performers in national ranking surveys, including "America's Best Hospitals" from U.S. News & World Report. UH is also home to Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals - part of The Harrington Project for Discovery & Development. UH is the second largest employer in northern Ohio with 26,000 employees. For more information, go to UHhospitals.org.


Auletta J.J.,Seidman Cancer Center | Auletta J.J.,Rainbow Babies and Childrens Hospital | Auletta J.J.,Case Western Reserve University | Deans R.J.,Case Western Reserve University | And 2 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

Multipotent, bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]), are cultureexpanded, nonhematopoietic cells with immunomodulatory effects currently being investigated as novel cellular therapy to prevent and to treat clinical disease associated with aberrant immune response. Emerging preclinical studies suggest that BMSCs may protect against infectious challenge either by direct effects on the pathogen or through indirect effects on the host. BMSCs may reduce pathogen burden by inhibiting growth through soluble factors or by enhancing immune cell antimicrobial function. In the host, BMSCs may attenuate pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine induction, reduce pro-inflammatory cell migration into sites of injury and infection, and induce immunoregulatory soluble and cellular factors to preserve organ function. These preclinical studies provide provocative hints into the direction MSC therapeutics may take in the future. Notably, BMSCs appear to function as a critical fulcrum, providing balance by promoting pathogen clearance during the initial inflammatory response while suppressing inflammation to preserve host integrity and facilitate tissue repair. Such exquisite balance in BMSC function appears intrinsically linked to Toll-like receptor signaling and immune crosstalk. © 2012 by The American Society of Hematology.

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