Pardubice, Czech Republic
Pardubice, Czech Republic

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Stumr F.,SEDIUM RD Ltd | Gabrovska D.,Food Republic | Rysova J.,Food Republic | Hanak P.,Food Republic | And 10 more authors.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2010

An interlaboratory study was performed in eight laboratories to validate an ELISA method developed for quantitative determination of casein in foods. The ELISA kit used is based on rabbit polyclonal antibodies. The kit is quite specific; no false-positive results or cross-reactivities were obtained for a broad range of food matrixes with zero content of milk proteins. All participants in the study received the casein kit, which included a standard operating procedure, a list of the samples, the samples, and a protocol for recording test results. The study included nine food samples: wheat flour, buckwheat flour, instant potato purée with milk, instant coffee with sugar and cream, a mixture for fancy bread, salami, liver pate, chocolate muesli with nuts, and a mixture for gluten-free bread. Three food samples with zero content of milk proteins showed a casein content lower than the lowest casein standard (1.0 mg CAS/kg) in most laboratories and measurements (64%). In 98% of the cases, the casein content was lower than the estimated LOQ. Two food samples with no dairy ingredient declared on the ingredient list contained casein levels higher than the second casein standard (3.0 mg CAS/kg) and the third standard (10.0 mg CAS/kg), respectively. Four food samples containing milk as an ingredient tested positive, and three showed casein contents higher than the highest standard (30.0 mg CAS/kg). The statistical tests (Cochran, Dixon) and analysis of variance were used for evaluation of the interlaboratory study results. Repeatability and reproducibility limits as well as LOQ (1.8 mg CAS/kg) and LOD (0.5 mg CAS/kg) for the kit were calculated from the results of the interlaboratory study.


Lexmaulova H.,ELISA Development Ltd. | Gabrovska D.,Food Republic | Rysova J.,Food Republic | Stumr F.,SEDIUM RD Ltd. | And 19 more authors.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2013

A collaborative study in 10 laboratories was performed to validate an ELISA method developed for the quantitative determination of peanut protein in foods. The ELISA kit used for this study is based on rabbit polyclonal antibody. This kit does not produce any false-positive results or cross-reactivity with a broad range of peanut-free food matrixes. All participants obtained the peanut ELISA kit with standard operational procedures, a list of samples, the samples, and a protocol for recording test results. The study included 15 food samples. Three food matrix samples of zero peanut content showed peanut protein content lower than the first standard (0.10 mg/kg). Three samples with peanut declared as an ingredient revealed peanut protein content outside the calibration curve (absorbance was above the highest standard) in all laboratories, and three samples had the peanut content reported either above the highest standard or within the calibration curve, depending on the laboratory. Six samples with peanut declared as an ingredient gave the peanut protein content within the calibration curve. Only these six samples, together with a positive control sample (CS2), were used for statistical evaluation. The statistical tests (Cochran, Grubbs, and Mandel) and analysis of variance were used for the evaluation of the collaborative study results. Repeatability and reproducibility limits, as well as an LOQ (LOQcollaborative 0.22 mg peanut proteins/kg) and an LOD (LODcollaborative 0.07 mg peanut proteins/kg) for the kit were calculated. © 2014 Publishing Technology.


Tomkova K.,SEDIUM RD Ltd | Cuhra P.,Food Republic | Rysova J.,Food Republic | Hanak P.,Food Republic | Gabrovska D.,Food Republic
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2010

An interlaboratory study was conducted in 11 laboratories to validate an ELISA method developed for the quantitative determination of egg white proteins (EWPs) in foods. The ELISA kit used for this study is based on sheep polyclonal antibody. It does not produce any false-positive results or cross-reactivity in a broad food matrix range with zero EWP content. All participants obtained the Egg ELISA Kit-native with standard operational procedure and the list of samples, as well as the samples and a protocol for recording test results. The study included 10 food samples. Four samples of food matrix with zero EWP content showed EWP content lower than the first standard (EWP content 0.5 mg/kg). One sample of food matrix with zero EWP content revealed EWP content higher than standard 3 (1.5 mg EWP/kg). Five food samples containing EWP as an ingredient tested positive and one negative. The statistical tests (Cochran, Dixon, and Mandel) and analysis of variance were used to evaluate the interlaboratory study results. Repeatability and reproducibility limits, as well as LOQ (1.4 mg EWP/kg) and LOD (0.43 mg EWP/kg), were calculated for the kit.


Cuhra P.,Food Republic | Gabrovska D.,Food Republic | Rysova J.,Food Republic | Hanak P.,Food Republic | Stumr F.,SEDIUM RD Ltd.
Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2011

An interlaboratory study in 12 laboratories was performed to prove the validation of the ELISA method developed for the quantitative determination of mustard protein in foods. The ELISA kit used for this study is based on rabbit polyclonal antibody. This kit did not produce any false-positive results or cross-reactivity with in-house validation for a broad range of food matrixes with no detectable mustard protein. All participants obtained the Mustard ELISA kit with standard operational procedures, a list of samples, samples, and a protocol for recording test results. The study included 15 food samples and two spiked samples. Seven food matrix samples of zero mustard content and four samples with mustard declared as an ingredient showed mustard protein content lower than that of the first standard (0.42 mg/kg). Four samples with mustard declared as an ingredient revealed mustard protein content above 12.5 mg/kg (the highest standard). The statistical tests (Cochran, Dixon, and Mandel) and analysis of variance were used to evaluate the interlaboratory study results. Repeatability and reproducibility limits, as well as an LOQ (1.8 mg mustard proteins/kg) and LOD (0.5 mg mustard proteins/kg), for the kit were calculated.


Palle-Reisch M.,University of Vienna | Palle-Reisch M.,Institute for Food Safety | Hochegger R.,Institute for Food Safety | Stumr S.,SEDIUM RD Ltd. | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

The study compares the applicability of two commercial mustard ELISA kits (Mustard ELISA Kit-specific and Mustard ELISA Kit-total) and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays (singleplex assay for white mustard, singleplex assay for black/brown mustard and duplex assay for the detection of white, black and brown mustard). Analyses of raw and brewed model sausages containing white and black/brown mustard in the range from 1 to 50 ppm indicate that both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays allow the detection of traces of mustard in raw and in brewed sausages. The ELISAs were found to be more sensitive than the real-time PCR assays. When the ELISAs and real-time PCR assays were applied to the analysis of 15 commercial foodstuffs differing in their labelling concerning mustard, in one sample mustard was detected with both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays although mustard was not indicated on the food ingredient list. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | SEDIUM RD Ltd
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of AOAC International | Year: 2011

An interlaboratory study was conducted in 11 laboratories to validate an ELISA method developed for the quantitative determination of egg white proteins (EWPs) in foods. The ELISA kit used for this study is based on sheep polyclonal antibody. It does not produce any false-positive results or cross-reactivity in a broad food matrix range with zero EWP content. All participants obtained the Egg ELISA Kit-native with standard operational procedure and the list of samples, as well as the samples and a protocol for recording test results. The study included 10 food samples. Four samples of food matrix with zero EWP content showed EWP content lower than the first standard (EWP content 0.5 mg/kg). One sample of food matrix with zero EWP content revealed EWP content higher than standard 3 (1.5 mg EWP/kg). Five food samples containing EWP as an ingredient tested positive and one negative. The statistical tests (Cochran, Dixon, and Mandel) and analysis of variance were used to evaluate the interlaboratory study results. Repeatability and reproducibility limits, as well as LOQ (1.4 mg EWP/kg) and LOD (0.43 mg EWP/kg), were calculated for the kit.

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