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Cortot A.,University of Lille Nord de France | Cortot A.,Lille University Hospital Center | Khediri F.,83 avenue Mohamed V | Mrad A.I.,Regional Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Gastroenterology Research and Practice | Year: 2011

Background. Although diosmectite has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of acute watery diarrhoea in children, its efficacy in adults still needs to be assessed. The objective of this study was therefore to assess the efficacy of diosmectite on the time to recovery in adults with acute diarrhoea. Methods. A total of 346 adults with at least three watery stools per day over a period of less than 48 hours were prospectively randomized to diosmectite (6g tid) or placebo during four days. The primary endpoint was time to diarrhoea recovery. Results. In the intention-to-treat population, median time to recovery was 53.8 hours (range [3.7-167.3]) with diosmectite (n=166) versus 69.0 hours [2.2-165.2] with placebo, (n=163; P=.029), which corresponds to a difference of 15.2 hours. Diosmectite was well tolerated. Conclusion. Diosmectite at 6g tid was well tolerated and reduced the time to recovery of acute watery diarrhoea episode in a clinically relevant manner. Copyright © 2011 Faouzi Khediri et al.


Darmoul M.,EPS Fattouma Bourguiba | Bouhaouala M.H.,Interior Security Forces Hospital | Charfi M.,Interior Security Forces Hospital | Hattab N.,EPS Fattouma Bourguiba
Pan Arab Journal of Neurosurgery | Year: 2011

We report a case of a right temporal epidural haematoma complicating a Sylvian arachnoid cyst in a 25-year-old man after head injury. The diagnosis of this association was confirmed by MRI. Outcome is favourable with spontaneous resolution of the haematoma. Few cases of association epidural haematoma arachnoid cyst were reported in literature but our case is, to our knowledge, the first one with a conservative treatment and spontaneous favourable outcome.

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