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Sjolund J.,Elekta Instrument AB | Sjolund J.,Linköping University | Forsberg D.,Linköping University | Forsberg D.,Sectra Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Physics in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2015

Radiotherapy planning and attenuation correction of PET images require simulation of radiation transport. The necessary physical properties are typically derived from computed tomography (CT) images, but in some cases, including stereotactic neurosurgery and combined PET/MR imaging, only magnetic resonance (MR) images are available. With these applications in mind, we describe how a realistic, patient-specific, pseudo-CT of the head can be derived from anatomical MR images. We refer to the method as atlas-based regression, because of its similarity to atlas-based segmentation. Given a target MR and an atlas database comprising MR and CT pairs, atlas-based regression works by registering each atlas MR to the target MR, applying the resulting displacement fields to the corresponding atlas CTs and, finally, fusing the deformed atlas CTs into a single pseudo-CT. We use a deformable registration algorithm known as the Morphon and augment it with a certainty mask that allows a tailoring of the influence certain regions are allowed to have on the registration. Moreover, we propose a novel method of fusion, wherein the collection of deformed CTs is iteratively registered to their joint mean and find that the resulting mean CT becomes more similar to the target CT. However, the voxelwise median provided even better results; at least as good as earlier work that required special MR imaging techniques. This makes atlas-based regression a good candidate for clinical use. © 2015 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


Eklund A.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University | Dufort P.,University of Toronto | Forsberg D.,Linköping University | Forsberg D.,Sectra Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Medical Image Analysis | Year: 2013

Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used today in a wide range of applications, mainly because they can dramatically accelerate parallel computing, are affordable and energy efficient. In the field of medical imaging, GPUs are in some cases crucial for enabling practical use of computationally demanding algorithms. This review presents the past and present work on GPU accelerated medical image processing, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to existing GPU implementations. The review covers GPU acceleration of basic image processing operations (filtering, interpolation, histogram estimation and distance transforms), the most commonly used algorithms in medical imaging (image registration, image segmentation and image denoising) and algorithms that are specific to individual modalities (CT, PET, SPECT, MRI, fMRI, DTI, ultrasound, optical imaging and microscopy). The review ends by highlighting some future possibilities and challenges. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Forsberg D.,Linköping University | Forsberg D.,Sectra Inc. | Lundstrom C.,Linköping University | Lundstrom C.,Sectra Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Physics in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2013

Reliable measurements of spinal deformities in idiopathic scoliosis are vital, since they are used for assessing the degree of scoliosis, deciding upon treatment and monitoring the progression of the disease. However, commonly used two dimensional methods (e.g. the Cobb angle) do not fully capture the three dimensional deformity at hand in scoliosis, of which axial vertebral rotation (AVR) is considered to be of great importance. There are manual methods for measuring the AVR, but they are often time-consuming and related with a high intra- and inter-observer variability. In this paper, we present a fully automatic method for estimating the AVR in images from computed tomography. The proposed method is evaluated on four scoliotic patients with 17 vertebrae each and compared with manual measurements performed by three observers using the standard method by Aaro-Dahlborn. The comparison shows that the difference in measured AVR between automatic and manual measurements are on the same level as the inter-observer difference. This is further supported by a high intraclass correlation coefficient (0.971-0.979), obtained when comparing the automatic measurements with the manual measurements of each observer. Hence, the provided results and the computational performance, only requiring approximately 10 to 15 s for processing an entire volume, demonstrate the potential clinical value of the proposed method. © 2013 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


Forsberg D.,Linköping University | Forsberg D.,Sectra Inc. | Lundstrom C.,Linköping University | Lundstrom C.,Sectra Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Physics in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2014

Detailed analysis of spinal deformity is important within orthopaedic healthcare, in particular for assessment of idiopathic scoliosis. This paper addresses this challenge by proposing an image analysis method, capable of providing a full three-dimensional spine characterization. The proposed method is based on the registration of a highly detailed spine model to image data from computed tomography. The registration process provides an accurate segmentation of each individual vertebra and the ability to derive various measures describing the spinal deformity. The derived measures are estimated from landmarks attached to the spine model and transferred to the patient data according to the registration result. Evaluation of the method provides an average point-to-surface error of 0.9 mm ± 0.9 (comparing segmentations), and an average target registration error of 2.3 mm ± 1.7 (comparing landmarks). Comparing automatic and manual measurements of axial vertebral rotation provides a mean absolute difference of 2.5° ± 1.8, which is on a par with other computerized methods for assessing axial vertebral rotation. A significant advantage of our method, compared to other computerized methods for rotational measurements, is that it does not rely on vertebral symmetry for computing the rotational measures. The proposed method is fully automatic and computationally efficient, only requiring three to four minutes to process an entire image volume covering vertebrae L5 to T1. Given the use of landmarks, the method can be readily adapted to estimate other measures describing a spinal deformity by changing the set of employed landmarks. In addition, the method has the potential to be utilized for accurate segmentations of the vertebrae in routine computed tomography examinations, given the relatively low point-to-surface error. © 2014 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

SHELTON, Connecticut, November 10, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- International medical imaging IT company Sectra (STO: SECT B) announces that Women's Imaging Associates has entered into a multi-year agreement to deploy Sectra Breast Imaging PACS for radiologist interpretation. The solution...


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

SHELTON, Connecticut, November 27, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- International medical imaging IT company Sectra (STO: SECT B) announces that ProMedica is adding the Sectra Cardiology Module into its existing enterprise imaging architecture. Through integration with the Epic Cupid reporting...


Trademark
Sectra Inc. and Sectra Imtec Ab | Date: 2012-09-19

Apparatus for receiving, analyzing, storing and reproducing digital images and medical images; computer programs to make information available via computer networks for paperless solutions, workflow monitoring, planning, statistics, invoicing purposes; apparatus for receiving, analyzing, storing and reproducing images for non-medical purposes. Medical apparatus, namely, x-ray apparatus for medical use, nuclear medicine diagnostic imaging apparatus and medical imaging apparatus incorporating medical imaging software; medical image processing apparatus, namely, MRI diagnostic apparatus; screens for medical purposes, namely, x-ray diagnostic apparatus; image processing apparatus as well as images for medical purposes, namely, x-ray diagnostic apparatus and x-ray film; image management system for medical purposes incorporated as a part of x-ray diagnostic apparatus; image management systems for archiving and communication of medical images incorporated as a part of x-ray diagnostic apparatus. Telecommunication access services to telecommunication networks; electronic data transmission services; computer-aided transmission of sound, data and images; digital transmission services of voice, data, images, signals, and messages via the Internet; communication via a portal in order to reach information, namely, communications by computer terminals; broadcasting of films and programmes via computer network; transmission of messages over electronic media; telecommunication, namely, providing access to distributed databases; providing access to computer networks; providing access to databases; providing access to electronic bulletin boards; electronic transmission via broadcasting of information from databases via the telecommunication network; communications services, namely, transmission of video, sound, images, documents and other data, computer programs, all via wire access, wireless access to networks covering a large area, local networks and internet. Technological image analysis for scientific purposes; providing of computer programs; consultancy regarding technological and scientific information, in the fields of computer technology, telecommunications, electronics and medical technology. Online medical services; analysis and examination of medical images for medical purposes; online analysis and examination of medical images for medical purposes.


Trademark
Sectra Inc. | Date: 2016-01-12

Scientific, photographic, cinematographic and optical apparatus and instruments for weighing, measuring and signaling; apparatus for recording, transmission, reproduction, storing and processing of data, information, sound and images; electrical apparatus and instrument for treatment, transmission and communication of signals; electronic encryption units; device for receiving, processing and transmission of data, information, sound and images; computers; lap top computers; central processing units processors; peripherals adapted for use with computers; touch sensitive electronic screens; telephones; mobile phones; printers; magnetic and optical data storage drives; encoded magnetic cards containing programming for encryption, decryption and authentication of data, information, sound and images; SD-cards containing programming for encryption, decryption and authentication of data, information, sound and images; SD-cards for computers and telephones containing programming for encryption, decryption and authentication of data, information, sound and images; data communications apparatus, information terminals, transaction terminals; communication and radio apparatus for encryption, decryption and authentication of data, information, sound and images; plotters; bar code readers; computer programs for digital management, processing, analysis, diagnosis, examination, reference, storage, archiving and communication of medical images; computer programs for collecting, storing and monitoring radiation doses in the medical field; computer operating system software; computer programs for recording, transmission, reproduction, storing and processing of data, information, sound and images; computer programs for medical purposes; computer programs for patient data; computer programs and computer hardware for medical image processing, managing of images, archiving and communication of medical images; computer programs and computer hardware for 3D visualization of images; computer programs for education, namely, educational software in the medical field, medical technology, telecommunication and secure communication fields; computer programs for pre-surgical planning; computer programs for provision of information through computer networks, document free solutions, workflow monitoring, schedules, statistics, invoicing; computer programs for time reservations and time planning; computer programs for encryption, decryption and authentication; electronic publications, namely, books, catalogues, magazines, manuals and handbooks in the medical, medical technology, telecommunication and secure communication fields; electronic components and replacement parts for computers, data communications apparatus; electronic encryption units, telephones, mobile phones, touch sensitive electronic screens, communication and radio apparatus. Medical imaging apparatus; computer screens and touch sensitive electronic screens incorporated as a part of and used in association with medical diagnosis apparatus; image management system for medical purpose, namely, for processing, analysis, diagnosis, examination, reference, storage, archiving and communication of medical images. Encrypted electronic transmission of data, information, sound and images; providing access to telecommunication networks; computer transmission services; computer aided transmission of data, information, sound and images; digital transmission and broadcasting services; electronic bulletin board services; IP-communication services (Internet Protocol); telecommunication gateway services; communications by computer terminals; video broadcasting and transmission services via the Internet, featuring films and movies; electronic transmission of messages; telecommunication, namely, providing access to distributed databases; providing user access to global computer networks; providing access to databases; providing access to electronic bulletin boards; transmission of database information via telecommunication networks; communication services, namely, transmission of data, information, sound, images and computer programs, all via wire and/or wireless provision access to networks that covers a large area, local networks and internet; rental of phones; secured data, information, sound and image transmission services. Industrial analysis and research services; design and development of computer hardware and computer programs; software as a service SaaS; consultancy services relating to information technology; installation of computer programs; design and development of networks; design and development of networks for encryption, decryption and authentication; consultancy in the field of computer systems and computer programs; computer programming; repair of computer programs maintenance, updating; provision of computer programs; rental of computers; rental of computer programs; server hosting; rental of web servers; consultancy in the field of technical and scientific information, including computer technology, telecommunication, electronics and medical technology; encryption, decryption and authentication of data, information, sound and images; interconnection of computer units; technical images analysis services; electronic (computer) data storage; software as a service SaaS in the field of recording, transmission, reproduction, storing and processing of data, information, sound and images and within the fields encryption, decryption and authentication and within the field for medical purposes; computerized storing of business information. Medical services; medical online services; analysis and examination of medical images; online services for analysis and examination of medical images; consultancy services in the field of health care; X-ray services; digital image processing for medical purposes; medical screening.


News Article | September 22, 2015
Site: www.computerworld.co.nz

Sectra Communications is working with Samsung Electronics to integrate its Tiger/R end-to-end hardware encryption system with the phone maker's Knox mobile security platform to create smartphones secure enough to carry government secrets. The market is a lucrative one: Another company, Secusmart, has won over several government organizations in recent years with a BlackBerry smartphone equipped with a microSD encryption module. The combination, costing around €2,000 (US$2,250), is approved by the German government to carry Restricted-level voice and data traffic. Restricted is one of the lowest ratings for government secrets. Sectra and Secusmart both use additional hardware in the form of a microSD card to assist in the encryption process and to protect encryption keys. While Secusmart's system will encrypt calls and data stored on the phone, Sectra's encrypts only voice traffic and text messages. There are other government-approved secure phones, such as the Teorem from Thales or one from Sectra itself rated to carry calls up to the "Secret" level, but these are dumb feature phones that can only make calls. The difficulty in obtaining government security approval for smartphones is that encrypting traffic is only part of the problem: The phones also need to prevent eavesdropping on that traffic before it is encrypted. That's why Sectra is working with Samsung on Tiger/R: It builds on the phone maker's Knox mobile management system for Android phones, which allows systems administrators to block the installation of untrustworthy or outright malicious apps that might compromise a device's security. Secusmart relies on similar functions in BlackBerry's Balance platform, which allows only approved apps to access secured data. "One of the biggest challenges is preventing people from installing apps," said Sectra Communications' president Michael Bertilsson. Games that can access the microphone or contain malware are a classic threat that Knox can help contain, he said. The previous generation of Sectra's encryption system, Panthon, did not use Knox. To protect calls from malware, the encryption system would shut down if it detected unauthorized apps on the phone, requiring an administrator to scan the phone for threats before unlocking it again. Panthon already has approval from the Dutch General Intelligence and Security Service, AIVD, for carrying Restricted-level traffic. Approval for Tiger/R is pending, according to Bertilsson, who said the approval process typically takes three to nine months. Organizations willing to maintain their own gateways and key servers can buy Tiger/R outright for 20,000 Swedish krona (US$2,400) or less depending on volume, although that price includes only the microSD card and Knox license, with a compatible Samsung phone costing extra. The system is also available as a service. A Tiger/R-equipped phone and all the necessary software licenses costs 1,000 Swedish krona per month. "If you go for the service solution the back-end infrastructure is provided by Sectra," said Bertilsson.


News Article | September 25, 2015
Site: www.computerworld.in

Sectra is linking its Tiger/R hardware and software encryption system with Samsung's Knox mobile management platform to carry 'Restricted' calls and texts for governments Sectra Communications is working with Samsung Electronics to integrate its Tiger/R end-to-end hardware encryption system with the phone maker's Knox mobile security platform to create smartphones secure enough to carry government secrets. The market is a lucrative one: Another company, Secusmart, has won over several government organizations in recent years with a BlackBerry smartphone equipped with a microSD encryption module. The combination, costing around €2,000 (US$2,250), is approved by the German government to carry Restricted-level voice and data traffic. Restricted is one of the lowest ratings for government secrets. Sectra and Secusmart both use additional hardware in the form of a microSD card to assist in the encryption process and to protect encryption keys. While Secusmart's system will encrypt calls and data stored on the phone, Sectra's encrypts only voice traffic and text messages. There are other government-approved secure phones, such as the Teorem from Thales or one from Sectra itself rated to carry calls up to the "Secret" level, but these are dumb feature phones that can only make calls. The difficulty in obtaining government security approval for smartphones is that encrypting traffic is only part of the problem: The phones also need to prevent eavesdropping on that traffic before it is encrypted. That's why Sectra is working with Samsung on Tiger/R: It builds on the phone maker's Knox mobile management system for Android phones, which allows systems administrators to block the installation of untrustworthy or outright malicious apps that might compromise a device's security. Sectra Communications president Michael Bertilsson: "One of the biggest challenges is preventing people from installing apps." Secusmart relies on similar functions in BlackBerry's Balance platform, which allows only approved apps to access secured data. "One of the biggest challenges is preventing people from installing apps," said Sectra Communications' president Michael Bertilsson. Games that can access the microphone or contain malware are a classic threat that Knox can help contain, he said. The previous generation of Sectra's encryption system, Panthon, did not use Knox. To protect calls from malware, the encryption system would shut down if it detected unauthorized apps on the phone, requiring an administrator to scan the phone for threats before unlocking it again. Panthon already has approval from the Dutch General Intelligence and Security Service, AIVD, for carrying Restricted-level traffic. Approval for Tiger/R is pending, according to Bertilsson, who said the approval process typically takes three to nine months. Organizations willing to maintain their own gateways and key servers can buy Tiger/R outright for 20,000 Swedish krona (US$2,400) or less depending on volume, although that price includes only the microSD card and Knox license, with a compatible Samsung phone costing extra. The system is also available as a service. A Tiger/R-equipped phone and all the necessary software licenses costs 1,000 Swedish krona per month. "If you go for the service solution the back-end infrastructure is provided by Sectra," said Bertilsson.

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