Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine and

Indian Hills Cherokee Section, United States

Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine and

Indian Hills Cherokee Section, United States
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PubMed | Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine and., Health Science University, Section on Pulmonary, Section on Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine and and Kyungsung University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences | Year: 2016

Evidence implicates the amount and location of fat in aging-related loss of muscle function; however, whether intramyocellular lipids affect muscle contractile capacity is unknown.We compared both in vivo knee extensor muscle strength, power, and quality and in vitro mechanical properties of vastus lateralis single-muscle fibers between normal weight (NW) and obese older adults and determined the relationship between muscle lipid content (both intramuscular adipose tissue and intramyocellular lipids) and in vivo and in vitro muscle function in NW and obese individuals.The obese group had a greater percentage of type-I fibers compared to the NW group. The cross-sectional area of type-I fibers was greater in obese compared to NW; however, maximal shortening velocity of type-I fibers in the obese was slower compared to NW. Type-I and type-IIa fibers from obese group produced lower specific force than that of type-I and type-IIa fibers from the NW group. Normalized power was also substantially lower (~50%) in type-I fibers from obese adults. The intramyocellular lipids data showed that total lipid droplet area, number of lipid droplets, and area fraction were about twofold greater in type-I fibers from the obese compared to the NW group. Interestingly, a significant inverse relationship between average number of lipid droplets and single-fiber unloaded shortening velocity, maximal velocity, and specific power was observed in obese participants. Additionally, muscle echointensity correlated with single-fiber specific force.These data indicate that greater intramyocellular lipids are associated with slower myofiber contraction, force, and power development in obese older adults.


Jenny N.S.,University of Vermont | French B.,University of Pennsylvania | Arnold A.M.,University of Washington | Strotmeyer E.S.,University of Pittsburgh | And 8 more authors.
Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences | Year: 2012

Background.Associations of inflammation with age-related pathologies are documented; however, it is not understood how changes in inflammation over time impact healthy aging. Methods.We examined associations of long-term change in C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) with concurrent onset of physical and cognitive impairment, subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD), and mortality in 1,051 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study All Stars Study. Biomarkers were measured in 1996-1997 and 2005-2006. Results. In 2005-2006, median age was 84.9 years, 63% were women and 17% non-white; 21% had at least a doubling in CRP over time and 23% had at least a doubling in IL-6. Adjusting for demographics, CVD risk factors, and 1996-1997 CRP level, each doubling in CRP change over 9 years was associated with higher risk of physical or cognitive impairment (odds ratio 1.29; 95% confidence interval 1.15, 1.45). Results were similar for IL-6 (1.45; 1.20, 1.76). A doubling in IL-6 change over time, but not CRP, was associated with incident CVD events; hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.34 (1.03, 1.75). Doubling in change in each biomarker was individually associated with mortality (CRP: 1.12 [1.03, 1.22]; IL-6 1.39 [1.16, 1.65]). In models containing both change and 2005-2006 level, only level was associated with CVD events and mortality. Conclusions .Although increases in inflammation markers over 9 years were associated with higher concurrent risk of functional impairment and subsequent CVD events and mortality, final levels of each biomarker appeared to be more important in determining risk of subsequent events than change over time © 2012 The Author.

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