Section of Respiratory Medicine

Indian Hills Cherokee Section, United States

Section of Respiratory Medicine

Indian Hills Cherokee Section, United States

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Nardini S.,Vittorio Veneto General Hospital | Camiciottoli G.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | Locicero S.,Niguarda CaGranda Hospital | Maselli R.,University of Catanzaro | And 6 more authors.
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine | Year: 2014

The most recent guidelines define COPD in a multidimensional way, nevertheless the diagnosis is still linked to the limitation of airflow, usually measured by the reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio below 70%. However, the severity of obstruction is not directly correlated to symptoms or to invalidity determined by COPD. Thus, besides respiratory function, COPD should be evaluated based on symptoms, frequency and severity of exacerbations, patient's functional status and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Therapy is mainly aimed at increasing exercise tolerance and reducing dyspnea, with improvement of daily activities and HRQoL. This can be accomplished by a drug-induced reduction of pulmonary hyperinflation and exacerbations frequency and severity. All guidelines recommend bronchodilators as baseline therapy for all stages of COPD, and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, both beta-2 agonist (LABA) and antimuscarinic (LAMA) drugs, are the most effective in regular treatment in the clinically stable phase. The effectiveness of bronchodilators should be evaluated in terms of functional (relief of bronchial obstruction and pulmonary hyperinflation), symptomatic (exercise tolerance and HRQoL), and clinical improvement (reduction in number or severity of exacerbations), while the absence of a spirometric response is not a reason for interrupting treatment, if there is subjective improvement in symptoms. Because LABA and LAMA act via different mechanisms of action, when administered in combination they can exert additional effects, thus optimizing (i.e. maximizing) sustained bronchodilation in COPD patients with severe airflow limitation, who cannot benefit (or can get only partial benefit) by therapy with a single bronchodilator. Recently, a fixed combination of ultra LABA/LAMA (indacaterol/glycopyrronium) has shown that it is possible to get a stable and persistent bronchodilation, which can help in avoiding undesirable fluctuations of bronchial calibre. © 2014 Nardini et al.


PubMed | University of Genoa, Vittorio Veneto General Hospital, Pneumology Unit, Section of Respiratory Medicine and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Multidisciplinary respiratory medicine | Year: 2014

The most recent guidelines define COPD in a multidimensional way, nevertheless the diagnosis is still linked to the limitation of airflow, usually measured by the reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio below 70%. However, the severity of obstruction is not directly correlated to symptoms or to invalidity determined by COPD. Thus, besides respiratory function, COPD should be evaluated based on symptoms, frequency and severity of exacerbations, patients functional status and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Therapy is mainly aimed at increasing exercise tolerance and reducing dyspnea, with improvement of daily activities and HRQoL. This can be accomplished by a drug-induced reduction of pulmonary hyperinflation and exacerbations frequency and severity. All guidelines recommend bronchodilators as baseline therapy for all stages of COPD, and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, both beta-2 agonist (LABA) and antimuscarinic (LAMA) drugs, are the most effective in regular treatment in the clinically stable phase. The effectiveness of bronchodilators should be evaluated in terms of functional (relief of bronchial obstruction and pulmonary hyperinflation), symptomatic (exercise tolerance and HRQoL), and clinical improvement (reduction in number or severity of exacerbations), while the absence of a spirometric response is not a reason for interrupting treatment, if there is subjective improvement in symptoms. Because LABA and LAMA act via different mechanisms of action, when administered in combination they can exert additional effects, thus optimizing (i.e. maximizing) sustained bronchodilation in COPD patients with severe airflow limitation, who cannot benefit (or can get only partial benefit) by therapy with a single bronchodilator. Recently, a fixed combination of ultra LABA/LAMA (indacaterol/glycopyrronium) has shown that it is possible to get a stable and persistent bronchodilation, which can help in avoiding undesirable fluctuations of bronchial calibre.


Rowan C.,Royal Brompton Hospital | Hansell D.M.,Royal Brompton Hospital | Renzoni E.,Royal Brompton Hospital | Maher T.M.,Royal Brompton Hospital | And 10 more authors.
American Journal of Surgical Pathology | Year: 2012

Diffuse "true" cystic lung disease is rare, and the specificity of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) has reduced the need for biopsy. We present 5 patients with similar clinical and HRCT features of cystic lung disease that were sufficiently atypical to warrant surgical lung biopsies that showed coexistent small airway diseases (SAD). There were 4 female patients and 1 male patient with a mean age of 43 years. All were never smokers. Four had symptoms such as dyspnea (1), cough (2), or both (1). HRCTs showed variably sized thin-walled cystic airspaces without zonal distribution, some with prominent vessels in their walls. One case was unilateral. Surgical lung biopsy showed cystic change comprising localized loss of alveolar density with coexistent SADs [chronic bronchiolitis (n=2), eosinophilic bronchiolitis, probable asthma (n=1), and diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (n=2)]. Two patients who were tested for Birt-Hogg-Dube-related gene mutations proved negative, and all lacked other features of Birt-Hogg-Dube. We hypothesize that chronic damage to small airways may lead to cystic degeneration in a minority of patients. Precedents in relation to Sjogren syndrome and hypersensitivity pneumonitis raise the possibility of a causal association between pathologies in these 2 anatomic compartments, although HRCT data in relation to common SADs indicate that this would be a rare phenomenon. The driving factor remains unknown. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Camiciottoli G.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | Camiciottoli G.,University of Florence | Bigazzi F.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | Magni C.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of COPD | Year: 2016

Background: In addition to lung involvement, several other diseases and syndromes coexist in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence of idiopathic arterial hypertension (IAH), ischemic heart disease, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), diabetes, osteoporosis, and anxious depressive syndrome in a clinical setting of COPD outpatients whose phenotypes (predominant airway disease and predominant emphysema) and severity (mild and severe diseases) were determined by clinical and functional parameters. Methods: A total of 412 outpatients with COPD were assigned either a predominant airway disease or a predominant emphysema phenotype of mild or severe degree according to predictive models based on pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 second/vital capacity; total lung capacity %; functional residual capacity %; and diffusing capacity of lung for carbon monoxide %) and sputum characteristics. Comorbidities were assessed by objective medical records. Results: Eighty-four percent of patients suffered from at least one comorbidity and 75% from at least one cardiovascular comorbidity, with IAH and PVD being the most prevalent ones (62% and 28%, respectively). IAH prevailed significantly in predominant airway disease, osteoporosis prevailed significantly in predominant emphysema, and ischemic heart disease and PVD prevailed in mild COPD. All cardiovascular comorbidities prevailed significantly in predominant airway phenotype of COPD and mild COPD severity. Conclusion: Specific comorbidities prevail in different phenotypes of COPD; this fact may be relevant to identify patients at risk for specific, phenotype-related comorbidities. The highest prevalence of comorbidities in patients with mild disease indicates that these patients should be investigated for coexisting diseases or syndromes even in the less severe, pauci-symptomatic stages of COPD. The simple method employed to phenotype and score COPD allows these results to be translated easily into daily clinical practice. © 2016 Camiciottoli et al.


Ryu J.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | Ryu J.,Rady Childrens Hospital | Heldt G.P.,Section of Respiratory Medicine | Heldt G.P.,University of California at San Diego | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Applied Physiology | Year: 2010

Rationale, permissive hyper-capnia, a stretch-limiting ventilation strategy, otten results in high Paco2. This strategy is associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in premature infants and its benefits have been attributed to diminished barotrauma. However, little is known about the independent effect of high CO2 levels during the lung development. Methods: mice were exposed to 8% CO2 or room air for 2 wk either from postnatal day 2 through 17 or as adults (∼2 mo of age). Lungs were excised and processed for protein, RNA, histology, and total lung volumes. Results: histologic analysis demonstrated that alveolar walls of CO2-exposed mouse pups were thinner than those of controls and had twice the total lung volume. Molecular analysis revealed that several matrix proteins in the lung were downregulated in mouse pups exposed to hypercapnia. Interstitial collagen type I α1, type III α 1, elastin and fihronectin protein, and mRNA levels were less than half of controls while collagen IV α5 was unaffected. This decrease in interstitial collagen could thus account for the thinning of the interstitial matrix and the altered lung biomechanics. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8, a collagenase that has specificity for collagen types I and m, increased in hypercapnic mouse pups, suggesting increased collagen, degradation. Moreover, tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1, a potent inhibitor of MMP-8, was significantly decreased. However, unlike pups, adult mice exposed to hypercapnia demonstrated only a mild increase in total lung volumes and did not exhibit similar molecular or histologic changes. Conclusions: although permissive hypercapnia may prevent lung injury from barotrauma, our study revealed that exposure to hypercapnia may be an important factor in lung remodeling and function, especially in early life. Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society.

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