Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Verona, Italy

Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

Verona, Italy

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Bedogni A.,Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Saia G.,University of Padua | Bettini G.,Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Tronchet A.,University of Padua | And 6 more authors.
Oral Oncology | Year: 2011

Surgical treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is controversial. Current recommendations contraindicate aggressive surgery because its results are unpredictable and may trigger disease progression. In this prospective study, we assessed the effectiveness of surgical resection of the jaws in cancer patients with BRONJ. Between June 2004 and July 2009, 30 cancer patients with refractory BRONJ underwent surgical resection of the jaws at our Units. They were followed-up weekly for the first month, at 3-month intervals up to 1 year, and at 6-month intervals up to 2 years. Panoramic radiographs and CT-scan were obtained at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Primary outcomes were the 24-month recurrence rate of BRONJ and the 24-month mortality rate. Secondary outcomes were post-operative complications, duration of hospital stay after surgery, time to return to oral diet, and degree of oral pain. The 30 patients had a median age of 66 years and were mostly females (80%). Twenty-eight underwent a single resection and two had both jaws resected, for a total of 32 resected jaws. The cumulative recurrence rate of BRONJ in resected jaws 3.1% and 9.4% at 3 and 6 months, respectively. All the jaws with recurrent BRONJ had osteomyelitis at the margins of bone resection. The cumulative incidence of death was 3%, 12% and 16% at 12, 18 and 24 months. Surgical resection of BRONJ was highly effective, with few post-operative complications and were not associated with long-term mortality. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oral oncology | Year: 2011

Surgical treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is controversial. Current recommendations contraindicate aggressive surgery because its results are unpredictable and may trigger disease progression. In this prospective study, we assessed the effectiveness of surgical resection of the jaws in cancer patients with BRONJ. Between June 2004 and July 2009, 30 cancer patients with refractory BRONJ underwent surgical resection of the jaws at our Units. They were followed-up weekly for the first month, at 3-month intervals up to 1 year, and at 6-month intervals up to 2 years. Panoramic radiographs and CT-scan were obtained at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Primary outcomes were the 24-month recurrence rate of BRONJ and the 24-month mortality rate. Secondary outcomes were post-operative complications, duration of hospital stay after surgery, time to return to oral diet, and degree of oral pain. The 30 patients had a median age of 66 years and were mostly females (80%). Twenty-eight underwent a single resection and two had both jaws resected, for a total of 32 resected jaws. The cumulative recurrence rate of BRONJ in resected jaws 3.1% and 9.4% at 3 and 6 months, respectively. All the jaws with recurrent BRONJ had osteomyelitis at the margins of bone resection. The cumulative incidence of death was 3%, 12% and 16% at 12, 18 and 24 months. Surgical resection of BRONJ was highly effective, with few post-operative complications and were not associated with long-term mortality.


PubMed | Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The oncologist | Year: 2012

Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a well-documented adverse event from treatment with nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs). During a preliminary histomorphometric study aimed at assessing the rate of bone remodeling in the jaws of patients with surgically resected BRONJ, we found a defect of bone mineralization (unpublished data). We hypothesized that osteomalacia could be a risk factor for BRONJ in patients taking NBPs. Therefore, we looked for static and dynamic histomorphometric evidence of osteomalacia in biopsies from subjects with and without BRONJ.This case-control study used histomorphometric analysis of bone specimens of patients using NBPs (22 patients with BRONJ and 21 patients without BRONJ) who required oral surgical interventions for the treatment/prevention of osteonecrosis. Patients were given tetracycline hydrochloride according to a standardized protocol before taking bone biopsies from their jaws. Biopsies with evidence of osteomyelitis or necrosis at histology were excluded from the study. Osteomalacia was defined as a mineralization lag time >100 days, a corrected mean osteoid thickness >12.5 mm, and an osteoid volume >10%.In all, 77% of patients with BRONJ were osteomalacic compared with 5% of patients without BRONJ, according to histomorphometry. Because osteomalacia was found almost exclusively in NBP users with BRONJ, this is likely to be a generalized process in which the use of NBPs further deteriorates mechanisms of bone repair.Osteomalacia represents a new and previously unreported risk factor for disease development. This finding may contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and help with the development of strategies to increase the safety of NBP administration.

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