Section of General Pathology

Genova, Italy

Section of General Pathology

Genova, Italy

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Martin C.,University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne | Martin C.,Cochin Hospital | Ohayon D.,University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne | Ohayon D.,Institute National Of La Santeeet Of La Recherche Meedicale U1016 | And 27 more authors.
American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology | Year: 2016

Neutrophil-associated inflammation during Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is a determinant of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). Neutrophil apoptosis is a key factor in inflammation resolution and is controlled by cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). p21/Waf1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is a partner of PCNA, and its mRNA is up-regulated in human neutrophils during LPS challenge. We show here that, after 7 days of persistent infection with P. aeruginosa, neutrophilic inflammation was more prominent in p212/2compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Notably, no intrinsic defect in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages was found in p212/2 compared with WT mice. Inflammatory cell analysis in peritoneal lavages after zymosaninduced peritonitis showed a significantly increased number of neutrophils at 48 hours in p212/2 compared with WT mice. In vitro analysis was consistent with delayed neutrophil apoptosis in p212/2 compared with WT mice. Ectopic expression of p21/waf1 in neutrophil-differentiated PLB985 cells potentiated apoptosis and reversed the prosurvival effect of PCNA. In human neutrophils, p21 messenger RNA was induced by TNF-a, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and LPS. Neutrophils isolated from patients with CF showed enhanced survival, which was reduced after treatment with a carboxy-peptide derived from the sequence of p21/waf1. Notably, p21/waf1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in neutrophils within lungs from patients with CF. Our data reveal a novel role for p21/waf1 in the resolution of inflammation via its ability to control neutrophil apoptosis. This mechanism may be relevant in the neutrophil-dominated inflammation observed in CF and other chronic inflammatory lung conditions. © Copyright 2016 by the American Thoracic Society.


PubMed | University of Paris Descartes and Section of General Pathology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: American journal of respiratory cell and molecular biology | Year: 2016

Neutrophil-associated inflammation during Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is a determinant of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF). Neutrophil apoptosis is a key factor in inflammation resolution and is controlled by cytosolic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). p21/Waf1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is a partner of PCNA, and its mRNA is up-regulated in human neutrophils during LPS challenge. We show here that, after 7 days of persistent infection with P. aeruginosa, neutrophilic inflammation was more prominent in p21(-/-) compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Notably, no intrinsic defect in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages was found in p21(-/-) compared with WT mice. Inflammatory cell analysis in peritoneal lavages after zymosan-induced peritonitis showed a significantly increased number of neutrophils at 48 hours in p21(-/-) compared with WT mice. In vitro analysis was consistent with delayed neutrophil apoptosis in p21(-/-) compared with WT mice. Ectopic expression of p21/waf1 in neutrophil-differentiated PLB985 cells potentiated apoptosis and reversed the prosurvival effect of PCNA. In human neutrophils, p21 messenger RNA was induced by TNF-, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and LPS. Neutrophils isolated from patients with CF showed enhanced survival, which was reduced after treatment with a carboxy-peptide derived from the sequence of p21/waf1. Notably, p21/waf1 was detected by immunohistochemistry in neutrophils within lungs from patients with CF. Our data reveal a novel role for p21/waf1 in the resolution of inflammation via its ability to control neutrophil apoptosis. This mechanism may be relevant in the neutrophil-dominated inflammation observed in CF and other chronic inflammatory lung conditions.


Traverso N.,Section of General Pathology | Ricciarelli R.,Section of General Pathology | Nitti M.,Section of General Pathology | Marengo B.,Section of General Pathology | And 4 more authors.
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity | Year: 2013

Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents. © 2013 Nicola Traverso et al.


PubMed | Section of General Pathology
Type: | Journal: Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity | Year: 2013

Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents.

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