Section of Allergy

Madrid, Spain

Section of Allergy

Madrid, Spain

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Chen C.-Y.,National Chung Cheng University | Lai N.-S.,Section of Allergy | Yang J.-J.,Chung Sun Medical University | Huang H.-l.,Fooyin University | And 5 more authors.
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications | Year: 2010

In this report, we identified the novel protein heart protein phosphatase 1-binding protein (Hepp1), encoded by FLJ23654. Hepp1 associated with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) by yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation, and far Western blotting assays. Northern blot analysis revealed that Hepp1 mRNA was only expressed in human heart and testis. Recombinant Hepp1 slightly enhanced the enzymatic activity of PP1 and antagonized the ability of phospho-inhibitor-1 or inhibitor-2 to inhibit PP1. Hepp1 protein in human heart tissues was detected by Western blot analysis. Together, our data suggest that Hepp1 can play a role in cardiac functions by working in concert with PP1. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Pascal M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Pascal M.,University of Barcelona | Grishina G.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Yang A.C.,University of Sao Paulo | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of shellfish allergy remains a challenge for clinicians. Several shellfish allergens have been characterized and their IgE epitopes identified. However, the clinical relevance of this sensitization is still not clear. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify allergens and epitopes associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. METHODS: Shrimp-sensitized subjects were recruited and grouped based on the history of shrimp-allergic reactions and challenge outcome. IgE reactivity to recombinant crustacean allergens, and IgE and IgG4 reactivity to peptides were determined. Subjects sensitized to dust mites and/or cockroach without shrimp sensitization or reported allergic reactions, as well as nonatopic individuals, were used as controls. RESULTS: A total of 86 subjects were recruited with a skin prick test to shrimp; 74 reported shrimp-allergic reactions, 58 were allergic (38 positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and 20 recent anaphylaxis), and 16 were tolerant. All subjects without a history of reactions had negative challenges. The individuals with a positive challenge more frequently recognized tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins than those found tolerant by the challenge. Especially a sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein positive test is very likely to result in a positive challenge, though the frequency of recognition is low. Subjects with dust mite and/or cockroach allergy not sensitized to shrimp recognized arginine kinase and hemocyanin. Several epitopes of these allergens may be important in predicting clinical reactivity. CONCLUSION: Tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic-calciumbinding-protein sensitization is associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Myosin light chain testing may help in the diagnosis of clinical reactivity. Arginine kinase and hemocyanin appear to be cross-reacting allergens between shrimp and arthropods. Detection of IgE to these allergens and some of their epitopes may be better diagnostic tools in the routine workup of shrimp allergy. © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.


PubMed | Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory, University of Barcelona, Hospital Infantil Universitario del Nino Jesus, Section of Allergy and 2 more.
Type: Controlled Clinical Trial | Journal: The journal of allergy and clinical immunology. In practice | Year: 2015

The diagnosis of shellfish allergy remains a challenge for clinicians. Several shellfish allergens have been characterized and their IgE epitopes identified. However, the clinical relevance of this sensitization is still not clear.The objective of this study was to identify allergens and epitopes associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp.Shrimp-sensitized subjects were recruited and grouped based on the history of shrimp-allergic reactions and challenge outcome. IgE reactivity to recombinant crustacean allergens, and IgE and IgG4 reactivity to peptides were determined. Subjects sensitized to dust mites and/or cockroach without shrimp sensitization or reported allergic reactions, as well as nonatopic individuals, were used as controls.A total of 86 subjects were recruited with a skin prick test to shrimp; 74 reported shrimp-allergic reactions, 58 were allergic (38 positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge and 20 recent anaphylaxis), and 16 were tolerant. All subjects without a history of reactions had negative challenges. The individuals with a positive challenge more frequently recognized tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding proteins than those found tolerant by the challenge. Especially a sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein positive test is very likely to result in a positive challenge, though the frequency of recognition is low. Subjects with dust mite and/or cockroach allergy not sensitized to shrimp recognized arginine kinase and hemocyanin. Several epitopes of these allergens may be important in predicting clinical reactivity.Tropomyosin and sarcoplasmic-calcium-binding-protein sensitization is associated with clinical reactivity to shrimp. Myosin light chain testing may help in the diagnosis of clinical reactivity. Arginine kinase and hemocyanin appear to be cross-reacting allergens between shrimp and arthropods. Detection of IgE to these allergens and some of their epitopes may be better diagnostic tools in the routine workup of shrimp allergy.


Ayuso R.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Sanchez-Garcia S.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Sanchez-Garcia S.,Hospital Infantil Universitario del Nino Jesus | Pascal M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | And 6 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Allergy | Year: 2012

Background: Shrimp is a frequent cause of severe allergic reactions world-wide. Due to issues such as cross-reactivity, diagnosis of shrimp allergy is still inaccurate, requiring the need for double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). A better understanding of the relationship between laboratory findings and clinical reactivity is needed. Objective: To determine whether sensitization to certain shrimp allergens or recognition of particular IgE epitopes of those allergens are good biomarkers of clinical reactivity to shrimp. Methods: Thirty-seven consecutive patients were selected with clinical histories of shrimp allergy. Skin prick test, specific IgE determinations, DBPCFC and immunoblot assays to shrimp extract were performed. IgE binding to synthetic overlapping peptides representing the sequence of the four allergens from the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) identified to date (Lit v1, Lit v2, Lit v3 and Lit v4) was analysed. Results: Of 37 (46%) patients, 17 had a positive challenge to shrimp (11 children and 6 adults). By microarray, patients with positive challenges showed more intense binding to shrimp peptides than those with negative challenges. Statistically significant differences in terms of the frequency and intensity of IgE binding to some epitopes were observed between the two groups. Diagnostic efficiency was higher for individual epitopes than for proteins. Particularly, efficiency was highest for certain Lit v 1 and Lit v 2 epitopes, followed by Lit v 3 and Lit v 4 epitopes. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance: Patients with positive shrimp challenges present in general more intense and diverse epitope recognition to all four shrimp allergens. IgE antibodies to these shrimp epitopes could be used as biomarkers for prediction of clinical reactivity in subjects with sensitization to shrimp. Patients with positive shrimp challenges show more intense sensitization and more diverse epitope recognition. Several IgE-binding shrimp epitopes could be used as biomarkers for predicting clinical reactivity in subjects with sensitization to shrimp. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


News Article | December 16, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Nationally, the highest rates of asthma-related deaths and hospitalizations are among low-income minority adults, but most existing research doesn't focus on these patients. In particular, studies may not investigate patients where they live, in complicated, difficult circumstances. Many adult asthma patients have multiple diseases and exposure to tobacco smoke, but much research reflects the convenience of recruiting patients in clinics and on the relative simplicity of studying patients who do not have accompanying diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. A new study analyzes patients at ground level, drawing on reports from community health workers who visit asthma patients at home, where extreme living conditions such as poor housing, neighborhood violence, and lack of social support impose steep barriers to public health care, as well as to high-quality research. The research team argues that home visits offer a fuller understanding of how the social environment of asthma patients impacts their overall health. Researchers from the Community Asthma Prevention Program (CAPP) at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe those challenges in a study in the December 2016 issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The authors focused on 301 adults living in low-income Philadelphia neighborhoods who were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid for asthma and required oral steroids for an exacerbation and/or had an emergency or inpatient visit within the last six months. Community health workers visited patients in their homes and found 71 percent rented, with many living in one-room apartments or overcrowded spaces with multiple family members. Many patients also live in typical Philadelphia rowhomes, which were built in the late 19th century and are difficult to maintain on a limited income. These patients are routinely exposed to common indoor asthma triggers, such as rodents, roaches, and mold. Only 25 percent of people who participated in the study were currently employed either part or full-time. Community health workers reported their impressions of these stark, and sometimes bleak, living conditions: "Many of these patients start to feel a sense of hopelessness, especially the very sick," says Tyra Bryant-Stephens, MD, corresponding author and medical director of CAPP at CHOP. "They feel there is very little possibility of changing their current living situation, which includes poor housing, exposure to violent crime, and limited access to transportation. Some of these living conditions make it difficult or impossible for patients to get to their medical visits, which results in a further decline of their health." Living in a high-stress environment encourages many patients to continue smoking, despite knowing it contributes to their asthma symptoms. Twenty-eight percent of those surveyed admitted they currently smoke. Other issues community health workers encountered were low education rates, limited access to healthy foods, and poor general health; 58 percent of patients had hypertension and 32 percent had diabetes. "Medical personnel no longer make house calls, so this research gives us a view of how poverty, unfavorable home conditions, and lack of social resources limit patients' ability to access healthcare," says Andrea J. Apter, MD, MSc, MA, principal investigator of the study and Chief of the Section of Allergy & Immunology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. "Without the knowledge of these barriers, health providers do not have the information needed to create a tailored and empathetic approach to asthma management." Bryant-Stephens adds, "As long as there is poor housing, health disparities will continue to exist, despite medical advancements being made in the fight against asthma. The issue is not limited to Philadelphia and needs to be addressed on a national scale. Without addressing poor housing, we will never be able to truly eliminate disparities in outcomes among adult asthma patients." Tyra Bryant-Stephens, Shakira Reed-Wells, Maryori Canales, Luzmercy Perez, A. Russell Localio, Andrea J. Apter. "Home Visits are Needed to Address Asthma Health Disparities in Adults," Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Published December 2016. http://dx. About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 535-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.


Weng M.-Y.,Medical College and Hospital | Weng C.-T.,Section of Allergy | Liu M.-F.,Medical College and Hospital
Clinical Rheumatology | Year: 2010

Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has recently been introduced as an immunosuppressive agent for the treatment of glomerulonephritis with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the data have been encouraging. However, response to MMF treatment appears to differ ethnically. Therefore, we determined efficacy and safety of low-dose MMF for Taiwanese patients with lupus nephritis. We studied 36 lupus nephritis patients who were treated with MMF. The dose started at 0.5 g/day and we collected the data from patients who received up to 1 g/day MMF. Outcome measures were 24 h for proteinuria, serum creatinine, C3/C4 levels, and anti-dsDNA titers collected at the baseline and at 3-month treatment intervals. Daily urinary protein significantly decreased from 6.15 ± 4.28 g to 2.69 ± 2.36 g at the last visit (P < 0.01) in spite of the significant absence of changes in serum creatinine levels. The response rate was 65.7% including five (14.3%) cases of complete remission and 18 (51.4%) cases of partial remission. The concomitant oral prednisolone dose decreased significantly from 20.07 ± 11.78 mg/day to 13.93 ± 6.79 mg/day at 6 months (P < 0.01). The level of C3 increased significantly from 59.46 ± 32.73 to 71.99 ± 25.81 (P < 0.01) and the antidsDNA antibody titer decreased from 161.71 ± 221.42 to 46.57 ± 117.47 (P < 0.01). No severe adverse effects were observed in the study. Low-dose MMF (0.5 to 1 g/day) combined with glucocorticoids appears to be a safe and effective therapy for lupus nephritis in Taiwanese patients. Our results suggest that lupus nephritis in Oriental patients might respond to lower doses of MMF than Caucasians. © Clinical Rheumatology 2010.


PubMed | Section of Allergy and Baylor College of Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America | Year: 2016

Fever of unknown origin (FUO) in children is frequently caused by infectious diseases. Angiostrongylus cantonensis, while a primary cause of eosinophilic meningitis, is rarely a cause of FUO. We present 2 pediatric cases of FUO caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis acquired in Houston, Texas, outside its usual geographic distribution.

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