Secretary of Agriculture

Porto Alegre, Brazil

Secretary of Agriculture

Porto Alegre, Brazil
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Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue visited an elementary school in Virginia yesterday to commemorate School Nutrition Employee Week, and used the appearance to announce major changes to nutrition standards in school lunch programs. Federal requirements will be relaxed in several categories, allowing more local control of student nutrition. "This announcement is the result of years of feedback from students, schools, and food service experts about the challenges they are facing in meeting the final regulations for school meals," Perdue said. "If kids aren't eating the food, and it's ending up in the trash, they aren't getting any nutrition – thus undermining the intent of the program." An overview of the new "flexibilities," according to the USDA: Whole grains: States may grant exemptions to schools experiencing hardship in serving 100 percent of grain products as whole-grain rich for the upcoming school years. Sodium: Schools will not be required to meet Sodium Target 2 for the next four years. Instead, schools that meet Sodium Target 1 will be considered compliant. Milk: Schools may return to serving 1 percent flavored milk through the school meals programs. "I've got 14 grandchildren, and there is no way that I would propose something if I didn't think it was good, healthful, and the right thing to do," Perdue continued. "And here's the thing about local control: it means that this new flexibility will give schools and states the option of doing what we're laying out here today. These are not mandates on schools." The new regulations (or lack thereof) roll back changes championed by former First Lady Michelle Obama in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. The change reflects the Trump Administration's second suspension in a day of a Michelle Obama-backed program; the White House also eliminated the education initiative Let Girls Learn yesterday. You Might Also Like


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue (C) talks to the media at the White House in Washington, U.S. April 25, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas (Reuters) - The Trump administration on Monday relaxed some rules aimed at making U.S. school lunches healthier, a move viewed by health advocates as a direct hit on former first lady Michelle Obama's signature issue. U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, in one of his first acts after his Senate confirmation last week, signed a proclamation that postpones sodium reductions, makes it easier to serve foods without whole grains, and allows the return of chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk with fat. "Certain aspects of the standards have gone too far," said Perdue, speaking at an elementary school in Virginia. The change comes as Donald Trump, one of the more fast-food-friendly presidents in recent years, has vowed to slash regulation. The 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act was championed by Michelle Obama and became a rallying cry for her critics after it set school lunch maximums for calories, cut sodium and artery-clogging trans fat, and required more fruits, vegetables and whole grains. The federally funded U.S. school lunch program, started by President Harry Truman in the 1940s, is overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and feeds more than 30 million, mostly low-income, children. Healthy lunch proponents expressed the most concern about relaxing efforts to reduce excessive dietary sodium, which is linked to high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke. "This will lock in very high levels of sodium in school lunches," said Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy for Center for Science in the Public Interest. The sodium limit for a high school lunch is now about 1,400 milligrams, or three-fourths of the recommended daily maximum, Wootan said. Perdue's proclamation delays plans to reduce that to 1,080 milligrams this school year. The ultimate target is about 740 milligrams in the 2022 school year, Wootan said. "Federal nutrition programs should provide nutritious food - that's just good government, not nanny state policies run amok," said Wootan, who added that many schools have adopted the standards and worked through early problems with ingredient availability and taste. The School Nutrition Association, which represents both the industry that sells food to schools and cafeteria workers, has lobbied to weaken the rules, particularly with regard to sodium. Many large food companies are suppliers to the U.S. school lunch program, including Tyson Foods Inc, Cargill Inc [CARG.UL] and General Mills Inc. Domino's Pizza Inc delivers to schools as part of its "Smart Slice" program.


SAN FRANCISCO — Wine Institute’s third international “California Wines Summit” taking place May 15-20, 2017 will host 30 key wine media and trade from 10 countries: Canada, United Kingdom, Hong Kong, Japan, China, Sweden, Mexico, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Ireland. The week of wine tastings and experiences was designed to build on California’s reputation as a world class wine producer and top destination for wine country travel. The media/trade group will taste 500 wines from more than 50 American Viticultural Areas in California, presented by 200 vintners from across the Golden State. The 10 markets represented by the Summit guests account for more than 80 percent of the value of California wine exports. U.S. wine exports, 90 percent from California, were $1.62 billion in 2016, a record dollar value and a 25 percent increase from five years ago. “Our California Wines Summit is providing key opinion leaders a wide-ranging experience of all that California wine offers,” said Wine Institute President and CEO Robert P. (Bobby) Koch. “We will show the passion and innovation of our people, the high quality and diversity of California wines and our strong environmental stewardship. This event is one of our many initiatives to reach our goal of $2 billion in California wine exports by 2020.” To open the week-long program, U.S. Congressman Mike Thompson and veteran industry analyst Jon Fredrikson will give presentations on the “state of the state” of the California wine industry and its significant contributions to California: adding 325,000 jobs, $57.6 billion in economic impact and 24 million tourist visits annually. To close out the week, California Secretary of Agriculture Karen Ross, President and CEO of Visit California Caroline Beteta, and Allison Jordan of the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance (CSWA) will discuss sustainability and how California vintners and growers have established the state as the wine world’s environmental leader in both acreage and production. CSWA’s 2,100 participating wineries and vineyards represent 75 percent of California’s winegrape acreage and 80 percent of its case production. The guests will also experience in-depth tastings of Chardonnay, Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, red and white blends, and sparkling wines from around the state led by top U.S. wine media and trade including Karen MacNeil, Leslie Sbrocco, Virginie Boone, Elaine Chukan Brown, Kelli White, Matt Stamp, MS, and Geoff Kruth, MS. “These international leaders will have the opportunity to meet our vintners and experience the beauty and diversity of California wine country and its renowned wine, food and lifestyle,” said Linsey Gallagher, Wine Institute Vice President of International Marketing. “We want them to share their experiences and what they learn about the tastes and trends in California wine when they return home and become “ambassadors” for California Wines in their home markets.”


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Michael Cleugh, a vice president at Eclipse Berry Farms, which grows strawberries on more than 800 acres in California, implored the state to find some common ground. "Competition among breeders and breeding companies is a good thing and there is room in this industry for California Berry Cultivars, UC Davis and any other breeders who want to improve our industry," Cleugh wrote in a letter to state leaders. "Growers need access to varieties that produce better yields and a better product. We need progress and we need it now.'' The letters come less than two weeks before the start of a trial between California Berry Cultivars (CBC) and UC Davis.  Shaw is revered in the strawberry industry, having developed 24 new types of strawberry plants – nearly one a year – that have allowed growers to double production in addition to dramatically improving the quality and flavor of the fruit. An estimated 65% of the acreage of California's $2.6 billion strawberry crop is planted with varieties developed by Shaw and Larson. The growers are aghast that UC Davis is portraying Shaw in legal filings as a researcher driven by greed. During their tenure at UC Davis, Shaw and Larson generated nearly $100 million in royalties for the university, shared nearly half of their own royalties – hundreds of thousands of dollars – with co-workers, and contributed more than $9 million of their own royalties to help fund the breeding program. Shaw, growers say, has been a singular force in improving the fortunes of all of California's strawberry growers. The researchers contend that, prior to their retirement in 2014, they, in concert with the UC Davis Plant Sciences Department, proposed a public-private partnership that would allow them to continue developing plants and sharing the royalties with UC Davis. With a diverse group of growers, they formed CBC with a plan to share royalties with the university. UC Davis initially approved the plan, but reversed itself after the California Strawberry Commission, with backing from large agricultural companies that have their own competing breeding programs, filed suit against UC Davis to intimidate the university into ending its relationship with CBC. As part of the settlement of that lawsuit, UC Davis confiscated 800 plants, destroyed about half of them and promised to involve the strawberry commission in any UC Davis licensing decisions. California Berry Cultivars sued the university after it seized the plants and blocked the ability of Shaw and Larson to continue to breed and develop new strains of strawberries.  UC Davis then counter sued, adding Shaw and Larson as co-defendants. California Berry Cultivars is seeking up to $45 million in damages in its suit against the university. Growers large and small, who depend on a supply of new and improved strawberry varieties, fear they have become pawns in a political fight between UC Davis and the mega strawberry companies that have their own breeding programs. Independent growers worry that they will be forced to buy expensive plants from private sources or face a precipitous drop-off in crop quality and production. A federal judge ruled last week that as part of their contracts with UC Davis, Shaw and Larson were obligated to assign the rights to those plants to the university. But the judge also decided there is evidence that the university acted in bad faith against the esteemed researchers. The judge's ruling suggested that both sides face some liabilities at trial. "On these facts, and given the language of this contract, from a legal standpoint it would be acceptable for the judgment to sock it to both sides,'' the court ruled. A.G. Kawamura, a strawberry farmer, former California Secretary of Agriculture and part owner of CBC, said that a vibrant and competitive breeding program is essential for the continued viability of the state's growers. "After nearly six decades of successful strawberry innovation, it has been very frustrating to see the feuding between the UC and so many of the multi-generation family farms that have supported and depended on this public-private breeding program," Kawamura said. "Costly litigation is such a waste when there are avenues for multi-benefit collaboration.  Our future as California strawberry growers is at stake.'' To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/strawberry-growers-urge-resolution-to-breeding-dispute-with-uc-system-300451343.html


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

School lunch programs in the U.S. will no longer be required to meet all of the nutrition standards set in the Obama era, the Trump administration announced this week. The news means that school lunches won't necessarily see the cuts in sodium and boosts in whole grains that were outlined in the Obama administration's Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which aimed to improve child nutrition. Specifically, rather than requiring that all grain products served in school lunches be whole grains, the government will allow schools to request exemptions to this requirement for the 2017-2018 school year, said U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, who signed a proclamation outlining the changes on Monday (May 1). And instead of requiring schools to continue reducing sodium levels in school meals, the government will let schools keep sodium levels where they are now, at least through 2020. In addition, schools will be allowed to serve 1 percent flavored milk, instead of just nonfat flavored milk. [10 Ways to Promote Kids' Healthy Eating Habits] Perdue said the changes were being made because existing nutrition requirements for school lunches were too stringent and had resulted in higher costs for school districts. In addition, Perdue said, some children weren't eating the healthier food. "If kids aren't eating the food and it's ending up in the trash, they aren't getting any nutrition — thus undermining the intent of the program," Perdue said in a statement. However, some nutrition experts expressed concern about the new standards. "While the health impact of reopening this rule is unknown at this point, it's clear [that] having American schoolchildren eat fewer whole grains is not heart-healthy," Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association, said in a statement. Relaxing the sodium requirements is also worrisome, she said. "If we don't move forward with the sodium standards, there could be serious health consequences for our kids," such as increased blood pressure, as well as higher risk of heart disease and stroke, Brown said. Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer watchdog group, also called the new sodium policy concerning. "Ninety percent of American kids eat too much sodium every day," Wootan said in a statement. "Schools have been moving in the right direction, so it makes no sense to freeze that progress in its tracks and allow dangerously high levels of salt in school lunch." The new policy does not affect the requirement for fruits and vegetables in school lunches or standards for food served in vending machines set in the Obama-era act.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

New statistics show that Delaware soybean farmers have increased yields by 25 percent since 2010 while reducing their land, water and energy use. The information comes from a national report examining sustainability in the soybean harvest. Delaware’s farmers produce soybeans in all three counties. By continuously improving their management practices and adopting new technologies, they have dramatically increased their productivity over the years, while using fewer resources. Based on statistics from the United Soybean Board’s “Soy Sustainability” research, Delaware soybean farmers produced 5.5 million bushels on 175,000 acres, averaging 32 bushels per acre in 2010. By 2015, they were able to produce 6.9 million bushels on 173,000 acres, averaging 40 bushels per acre. That’s a 25 percent increase in bushels produced and on fewer acres. And they’ve done so while reducing their impact on the environment. Since 2010, they’ve: “A high-quality and high-yielding soybean harvest and a healthy environment are not mutually exclusive. At the center of both is a sustainable farm,” says Jay Baxter, chairman of the Delaware Soybean Board and soybean farmer from Georgetown, Delaware. “We work hard to produce soybeans more efficiently each year, while reducing our impact on the environment, all with our neighbors and future generations in mind.” The sustainability report was compiled using data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, among other sources. The United Soybean Board has placed a high priority on defining and measuring sustainability of the nation’s crop. Delaware soybean farmers now plant about 180,000 acres per year, harvesting more than 6.9 million bushels and contributing $60 million to Delaware’s economy. The Delaware Soybean Board consists of nine farmer-directors and the Secretary of Agriculture, and administers the federal soybean checkoff programs in the state. Under the soybean checkoff, one half of one percent of the net market value of soybeans is assessed at the first point of sale to support research, marketing and education programs to benefit the soybean industry. About Delaware Soybean Board: The Delaware Soybean Board administers soybean checkoff funds for soybean research, marketing and education programs in the state. One-half of the checkoff funds stay in Delaware for programs; the other half is sent to the United Soybean Board. To learn more about the Delaware Soybean Board, visit http://www.desoybeans.org.


A seasonal food service program and full complement of staff provides three healthy meals each day. Through a contract with the Department of Education Summer Food Service Program, free meals are provided to eligible children during all camping sessions. This federally funded Summer Food Service Program provides approximately 9% of the total Camp Allegheny and Retreat Center operating budget, which helps keep the costs at a minimum for those attending. Meals are provided regardless of race, color, national origin, gender or handicap. Any person who believes he or she has been discriminated against in any USDA-related activity should contact the Secretary of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250. All children from households that receive food assistance through the DPA Pennsylvania ACCESS Card Program or Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) are eligible. The family size and income guidelines for free and reduced priced meals are as follows: For information on attending Camp Allegheny and Retreat Center or sponsoring a camper, contact your local Salvation Army Worship and Service Center or the organization's Youth Department at 412 446-1545. Camp Allegheny and Retreat Center can also be reserved in the off season for workshops, reunions or special events. Celebrating over 150 years of global service as both a church and a social service organization, The Salvation Army began in London, England in 1865. Today, it provides critical services in 129 countries worldwide. The 28-county Western Pennsylvania Division serves thousands of needy families through a wide variety of support services. To learn more about The Salvation Army in Western Pennsylvania, log on to www.wpa.salvationarmy.org. The Salvation Army … doing the most good for the most people in the most need. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/a-life-changing-experience-for-western-pa-needy-kids--salvation-armys-camp-allegheny-gearing-up-for-summer-season-300464408.html


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dickerson, of Laurel, farms about a thousand acres of soybeans, corn and wheat, and raises peas, sweet corn, baby lima beans, edamame, string beans, yellow squash on contract and pumpkins and other vegetables for the fresh market. He also operates a roadside stand and raises broilers for Perdue Farms, Inc. Dickerson also attended the United Soybean Board’s 2015 “See For Yourself” tour of China and Vietnam. The Delaware Soybean Board sponsored his trip. Delaware farmers plant about 180,000 acres of soybeans each year, and the crop generates approximately $60 million in value to the state. Delaware’s agricultural industry contributes about $8 billion per year to the Delaware economy. Soybean Leadership College, coordinated by the American Soybean Association, provides current and future agricultural industry leaders with training to effectively promote the soybean industry, communicate key agricultural messages, and work to expand U.S. soybean market opportunities domestically and internationally. The program also fosters networking between growers from across the country, encouraging collaboration, which in turn increases the effectiveness of soybean growers at the local, regional and national level. The Delaware Soybean Board consists of nine farmer-directors and the Secretary of Agriculture. Funded through a one-half of one percent assessment on the net market value of soybeans at their first point of sale, the checkoff works with partners in the value chain to identify and capture opportunities that increase farmer profit potential. One-half of the soybean checkoff assessments collected by the state boards are forwarded to the United Soybean Board. About Delaware Soybean Board: The Delaware Soybean Board administers soybean checkoff funds for soybean research, marketing and education programs in the state. One-half of the checkoff funds stay in Delaware for programs; the other half is sent to the United Soybean Board. To learn more about the Delaware Soybean Board, visit http://www.desoybeans.org.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - February 16, 2017) - The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) commends Alexander Acosta on his nomination as Secretary of Labor. Having served in three presidentially-appointed and Senate confirmed positions; Acosta holds a long track record of public service and dedication to the American people. "R. Alexander Acosta is an outstanding choice for this cabinet position," said Javier Palomarez, President & CEO of the USHCC. "His record reflects a skill set and expertise both in the private and public sector which will serve the administration and the nation greatly. We are thrilled to work with Acosta on a host of economic and labor issues which directly affect our members and the Hispanic community as a whole. When Gov. Purdue was nominated for Secretary of Agriculture, I said we will continue to advocate for diversity within the administration, including if and when a cabinet position becomes available during President Trump's time in office. Our ongoing dialogue with the administration has proven effective." The USHCC applauds President Trump's nomination of R. Alexander Acosta for Secretary of Labor, not because the nominee is of Hispanic descent, but because he is highly qualified and the best-suited choice for this significant cabinet post. The USHCC actively promotes the economic growth, development and interests of more than 4.2 million Hispanic-owned businesses that, combined, contribute over $668 billion to the American economy every year. It also advocates on behalf of 260 major American corporations and serves as the umbrella organization for more than 200 local chambers and business associations nationwide. For more information, visit ushcc.com. Follow the USHCC on Twitter @USHCC.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

John Comegys of Hartly in Kent County had the state’s top 2016 soybean yield with 80.74 bushels per acre of full season soybeans. Comegys planted Pioneer P36T86R. Kevin Evans of Bridgeville in Sussex County won the statewide double crop competition with 73.51 bushels per acre. Evans planted Pioneer 42T71, a Plenish bean which produces high-oleic soybean oil. Both men received a check for $1,000. The awards were announced by Delaware Soybean Board chairman James “Jay” Baxter, a farmer from Georgetown, at the annual Ag Week education program in Harrington. The Delaware Soybean Board is funded by the national soybean checkoff program, which assesses one-half of one percent of the net market value of soybeans at the first point of sale. The funds are collected for soybean research, marketing and education projects. County winners for full season soybeans included Robert Garey of Sussex County with 73.52 bushels per acre; Dale Scuse of Kent County with 80.10 bushels per acre; and Robbie Emerson of New Castle County with 66.84 bushels per acre. County winners for double crop beans included David Smoker of Sussex County with 69.13 bushels per acre and Dale Scuse of Kent County with 62.94 bushels. There was no entry from New Castle County for double crop beans. County level winners received $250. All entries in the contest were irrigated beans. Delaware farmers plant about 180,000 acres of soybeans each year, and the crop generates approximately $60 million in value to the state. Delaware’s agricultural industry contributes about $8 billion per year to the Delaware economy. The Delaware Soybean Board consists of nine farmer-directors and the Secretary of Agriculture, and administers the federal soybean checkoff programs in the state. About Delaware Soybean Board: The Delaware Soybean Board administers soybean checkoff funds for soybean research, marketing and education programs in the state. One-half of the checkoff funds stay in Delaware for programs; the other half is sent to the United Soybean Board. To learn more about the Delaware Soybean Board, visit http://www.desoybeans.org.

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