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Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species -- a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal. The odd animal doesn't seem to eat much, instead it gets its energy from a form of sulfur. The findings, led by scientists at the University of Utah, Northeastern University, University of the Philippines, Sultan Kudarat State University and Drexel University, will be published online in the Apr. 17 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. People have known about the existence of the creature for centuries. The three- to five-foot long, tusk-like shells that encase the animal were first documented in the 18th century. "The shells are fairly common," begins lead investigator Daniel Distel, Ph.D., a research professor and director of the Ocean Genome Legacy Center at Northeastern University, "But we have never had access to the animal living inside." The animal's preferred habitat was unclear, but the research team benefitted from a bit of serendipity when one of their collaborators shared a documentary that aired on Philippine television. The video showed the bizarre creatures planted, like carrots, in the mud of a shallow lagoon. Following this lead, the scientists set up an expedition and found live specimens of Kuphus polythalamia. With a live giant shipworm finally in hand, the research team huddled around Distel as he carefully washed the sticky mud caked to the outside of the giant shipworm shell and tapped off the outer cap, revealing the creature living inside. "I was awestruck when I first saw the sheer immensity of this bizarre animal," says Marvin Altamia, researcher at the marine sciences institute, University of the Philippines. "Being present for the first encounter of an animal like this is the closest I will ever get to being a 19th century naturalist," says the study's senior author Margo Haygood, a research professor in medicinal chemistry at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy. Because the animal had never been studied rigorously, little was known about its life history, habitat, or biology. "We suspected the giant shipworm was radically different from other wood-eating shipworms," says Haygood. "Finding the animal confirmed that." Altamia continues, "Frankly, I was nervous. If we made a mistake, we could lose the opportunity to discover the secrets of this very rare specimen." The scientists were then faced with an interesting dilemma explain why Kuphus is so unusual. The answer may lie in the remote habitat in which it was found, a lagoon laden with rotting wood. The normal shipworm burrows deep into the wood of trees that have washed into the ocean, munching on and digesting the wood with the help of bacteria. Unlike its shipworm cousins, Kuphus lives in the mud. It also turns to bacteria to obtain nourishment, but in a different way. Kuphus lives in a pretty stinky place. The organic-rich mud around its habitat emits hydrogen sulfide, a gas derived from sulfur, which has a distinct rotten egg odor. This environment may be noxious for you and me, but it is a feast for the giant shipworm. And yet Kuphus themselves don't eat, or if they do, they eat very little. Instead, they rely on beneficial bacteria that live in their gills that make food for them. Like tiny chefs, these bacteria use the hydrogen sulfide as energy to produce organic carbon that feeds the shipworm. This process is similar to the way green plants use the sun's energy to convert carbon dioxide in the air into simple carbon compounds during photosynthesis. As a result, many of Kuphus's internal digestive organs have shrunk from lack of use. The giant shipworm's lifestyle lends support to a hypothesis proposed by Distel almost two decades ago. Acquiring a different type of beneficial bacteria could explain how shipworms transition from a wood-eating organism to one that uses a noxious gas in mud to survive. The research team will continue to examine the role wood plays in the unique transition between the normal shipworm and the giant shipworm. "We are also interested to see if similar transitions can be found for other animals that live in unique habitats around the world," said Distel. The discovery of this flagship creature expands on our understanding of biodiversity in the Indo-Pacific region, which was made possible through collaborative nature of this interdisciplinary, international research group. This work is an important component of research grants provided by the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program. The program helps researchers conduct projects in developing countries to identify unique, novel compounds for future drug development, while building research capacity and conserving biodiversity in the host country. Distel and Haygood collaborated with colleagues from University of Utah, Drexel University, Second Genome in San Francisco, Ecole Normale Superieure, France and the University of the Philippines, the Sultan Kudarat State University and the Philippine Genome Center in the Philippines. The research was funded by National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and U.S Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute.


— Global Human Micobiome Industry Report offers market overview, segmentation by types, application, countries, key manufactures, cost analysis, industrial chain, sourcing strategy, downstream buyers, marketing strategy analysis, distributors/traders, factors affecting market, forecast and other important information for key insight. Companies profiled in this report are Vedanta, Seres Therapeutics, Second Genome, Rebiotix, ActoGeniX, Enterome BioScience, AvidBiotics, 4D Pharma Research Ltd, Enterologics, Metabogen, Metabiomics, Ritter Pharmaceuticals, Osel, Symberix, Miomics, Symbiotix Biotherapies, MicroBiome Therapeutics LLC in terms of Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017). Split by Product Types, with sales, revenue, price, market share of each type, can be divided into • Gastrointestinal Tract Human Micobiome • Urogenital Tract Human Micobiome • Other Split by applications, this report focuses on sales, market share and growth rate of Human Micobiome in each application, can be divided into • Treatment • Diagnosis Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/424363 Table of Content: 1 Human Micobiome Market Overview 2 Global Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) and Market Share by Manufacturers 3 Global Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 4 Global Human Micobiome Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 5 North America Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 6 Latin America Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 7 Europe Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 8 Asia-Pacific Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 9 Middle East and Africa Human Micobiome Sales, Revenue (Value) by Countries, Type and Application (2012-2017) 10 Human Micobiome Manufacturing Cost Analysis 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis 14 Global Human Micobiome Market Forecast (2017-2022) 15 Research Findings and Conclusion 16 Appendix Inquire more for more details about this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/424363 For more information, please visit https://www.themarketreports.com/report/2017-2022-global-top-countries-human-micobiome-market-report


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The type of bacteria in your gut may help diagnose colorectal cancer. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and other institutions have identified specific types of bacteria that seem to be abundant in individuals with colorectal cancer. Using a combination of markers specific for these fecal microbes, scientists anticipate that a noninvasive, sensitive clinical diagnostic test potentially can be developed. The study is published in Gut. Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-associated death in the United States. Individuals diagnosed early have a 90 percent chance of survival; however, more than 30 percent of individuals 50 years old or older, the high-risk group, indicate never having been screened for the disease. Currently, recommended screening methods include an invasive procedure - colonoscopy - and noninvasive tests, such as home-based fecal occult blood tests, and Cologuard for detecting colorectal cancer DNA markers and blood in stools. Each of these methods has its shortcomings, so to meet the need for a sensitive, noninvasive diagnostic test for colorectal cancer, the team of researchers looked at gut microbes as indicators of the disease. "A number of studies have shown an association between fecal microbes and colorectal cancer; however, there is limited agreement in the types of microbes reported," said first author Dr. Manasi Shah, who was a graduate student at the University of Texas School of Public Health during the course of this project. "I was interested in finding a microbial marker for the disease. One way to do this is by carrying out a single-institution study, but this takes a long time for sample collection, involves sequencing the microbes' DNA and is expensive. I noticed that some of the published studies provided the means for accessing the raw microbial DNA sequencing data of the samples. How great it would be, I thought, if I could leverage existing raw data across multiple cohorts and come up with a generalizable marker for the disease." Shah realized that to take this approach, in addition to her biostatistical training, she would need to learn the bioinformatics tools necessary for analyzing next generation sequencing data. She approached senior author Dr. Emily Hollister, assistant professor of pathology at Baylor and Texas Children's Hospital and director of microbial ecology for the Texas Children's Microbiome Center, proposed her idea and expressed interest in learning the tools required to reprocess microbial sequence data from its original format. "Manasi had the interest, and we had the expertise," Hollister said. "In our center, we had been planning to compare a series of different statistical tools to analyze large amounts of microbiome data. Manasi's proposal fit very well with our goals." Researchers reanalyzed raw bacterial DNA sequence data from several studies and confirmed previously reported types of bacteria associated with colorectal cancer and identified other bacteria not previously associated with the disease. Easier said than done "In our experience, collecting the raw data from the published studies was an uphill task," Shah said. "Some studies shared all the sample-associated microbial DNA sequences and clinical data, others only shared partial data or did not share any data at all. After much effort, I was able to gather data from nine of 12 published studies. This highlights the need for an initiative to encourage investigators to share their data upon publication, which will help wider dissemination and reproducibility in the field." The researchers also had to overcome the difficulties posed by the diversity of technological approaches used by different laboratories analyzing the samples. "This was an incredibly large, complex multinational study," said co-author Todd DeSantis, co-founder and vice president of informatics at Second Genome Inc. "We saw many differences between medical centers in the way each collected and stored stool samples and in the methods used to process the bacterial DNA in stools. These differences can be problematic for identifying the bacterial strains that proliferate in cancer patients, but our Second Genome KnowlegeBase Team, led by co-author Thomas Weinmaier, found ways to enhance our software platform to address these differences along the way. The findings that emerged from this challenging data set helped validate our platform, and in the process we were able to deliver high-quality insights to advance our collaboration with Dr. Hollister." After reanalyzing large amounts of raw bacterial DNA sequence data from several studies uniformly using a variety of statistical tools, the scientists confirmed previously reported types of bacteria associated with colorectal cancer and identified other bacteria not previously associated with the disease. "The fact that even when we combined several different studies we could correctly classify a sample as a colorectal cancer case or control with 80 percent accuracy solely based on microbial abundances was very encouraging," Shah said. "This is a promising first step to develop a noninvasive test that might be used in the detection of colorectal cancer, supplementing colonoscopy or fecal occult blood tests," Hollister said. "The same strategy could be applied for developing diagnostic tests or therapeutics for other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (a form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, among others for which the microbiome is currently being investigated," Shah said. Other contributors to this work include Paul J McMurdie, Julia L Cope, Adam Altrichter and José-Miguel Yamal. The authors are affiliated with one or more of the following institutions: Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas School of Public Health, Texas Children's Hospital, Second Genome Inc, Whole Biome Inc and Diversigen Inc.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Human Microbiome Market Insights, Opportunity, Analysis, Market Shares And Forecast 2017 - 2023" report to their offering. Global Human Microbiome Market Estimated at CAGR of 21.1% During 2016-2023 The main driver of the global human Microbiome market is frequent use of probiotics, medical foods and prebiotics. Probiotics are those products which contains live bacteria and yeasts that are good for health, especially for digestive system. Generally bacteria are those living organisms that cause diseases. Body consists of bacteria, both good and bad. Probiotics are generally called "good" or "helpful" bacteria because they help to keep body healthy. Probiotics are naturally found in the body. Some foods and supplements contains probiotic bacteria which on consumption gives benefits to the body such as Bifidobacterium is beneficial in treatment of infant diarrhea Continuous consumption of antibiotics can increase demand of efficient and safe medication but sometime it give rise to reaction also if it doesn't suits the person. Additionally, changes in lifestyle led to increase in number of diseases, rise in population is another factor contributing to the increase of the diseases and is one of the major driver for the global microbiome market. Cancer and diabetics are some major disease increasing day by day In the Asia pacific region there are approximately 300,000 new cases of cancer and diabetics, which is more than half of the total cases globally. China and India are key emerging nation across the globe. China has biggest influence on Asia Pacific region growth. It is estimated that there were 4.3 million new cancer cases found, which around 2.8 million in 2015 were. Some of the major players of the human Microbiome market are Vedanta Biosciences, Ritter pharmaceuticals, Actoginics, avidbiotics, rebiotix, osel, , Miomics, E.I. du Pont de Nemours, Second Genome. For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/k39x96/global_human


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Arrowhead Publishers is pleased to announce that a variety of expert panel discussions have been announced for its upcoming 3rd Annual Translational Microbiome Conference. This event, which will take place April 11-13, 2017 in Boston, MA, will unite presenters and attendees from academia, industry, and the government to provide a multi-stakeholder perspective on the latest trends and developments in the microbiome space. For more information, visit: http://www.microbiomeconference.com. The CEO of CosmosID Inc. Manoj Dadlani will lead the panel on bioinformatics tools for clinical applications in metagenomics, as well as challenges to overcome in the complex clinical and regulatory environments. Panelists will also discuss the dire need for robust bioinformatics tools that can address the complex clinical and regulatory environments. Co-founder and CEO of Whole Biome, Dr. Colleen Cultcliffe, will be leading a panel discussion on the microbiome and its growing presence in the media. As new therapeutics are being developed, the microbiome industry must find ways to overcome the hype and unrealistic timelines that can be expected by the general public. Mohan S. Iyer, CBO at Second Genome, will be moderating the panel on pharma companies working in the microbiome industry. He and the panelists will discuss the latest partnerships between the microbiome industry and pharma, and the deals outlook for 2017. The “Strategies and Risks for Developing Comprehensive Patent and Licensing Strategies” panel will be led by Greg Sieczkiewicz, Managing Director at MPM Capital. This panel will analyze the various challenges and opportunities that organizations will experience when developing a patent portfolio in the microbiome therapeutics industry. They will also discuss what is necessary from a licensing perspective in order to create a successful pharma-biotech relationship. Director of Research and Development of Reckitt Benckiser, Joe Rubino, will moderate the panel discussion “Time to Put the Hygiene Hypothesis to Rest?” JP Benya, Vice President Commercial of Assembly Biosciences will lead the panel discussion on commercial challenges and opportunities in the microbiome-based therapeutics industry. By focusing on critical factors to consider when launching a MBT including regulatory considerations, customer expectations, and messaging implications, this panel will provide expert insight into the future of microbiome-based therapeutics. Arrowhead Publishers’ 3rd Annual Translational Microbiome Conference will continue to focus and build on the challenges and hurdles that companies working in the microbiome space will have to recognize and navigate in order to successfully commercialize their products. With a broad focus spanning multiple disease states (oncology, dermatology, inflammatory disorders, among others), attendees will have the opportunity to hear the leading companies discuss integral components of successful businesses. For more information, visit: http://www.microbiomeconference.com/brochure. For more information, please contact: John Waslif: Managing Director Arrowhead Publishers 866-945-0263 ext 700 john.waslif(at)arrowheadpublishers(dot)com


News Article | January 29, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Fast Company is excited to announce the addition of 107 new members to the Most Creative People in Business 1000, an exclusive community of influencers in business from across the economy and around the globe. These mavens of business, art, technology, and social good were chosen from among the creative forces featured in the magazine during 2015. Selected for their vision and fearlessness in today's quickly shifting business landscape, they come to us from the worlds of tech, retail, fashion, health care, space science, and entertainment. They hail from Detroit, Beijing, Stockholm, Tokyo, Tel Aviv, Vancouver, Miami, and Chattanooga, Tennessee. Whether they're digging into news about the world's most important issues, helping to save the environment, or reinventing retail, they'll continue to be a major part of our stories, newsletters, and events. And of course, they'll be as active as ever across social platforms—follow along with the hashtag #MCP1000 and our MCP 1000 Twitter list. Here are the pioneers in business who have stood out from all other leaders we reported on this past year: Bilikiss Adebiyi-Abiola, Wecyclers David Alpert, Skybound Entertainment Sam Altman, Y Combinator Steve Aoki, DJ/entrepreneur Balanda Atis, L’Oréal Lucy Beard, Feetz Milena Berry, PowerToFly Kayvon Beykpour, Periscope Alex Blumberg, Gimlet Media Brené Brown, Author/speaker Mika Brzezinski, Morning Joe Stewart Butterfield, Slack Åsa Caap, Our/Vodka Anthony Casalena, Squarespace Pete Cashmore, Mashable Joy Cho, Oh Joy! Ken Coleman, Andreesen Horowitz Richard Copcutt, Converse Katie Couric, Yahoo Scott Crouch, Mark43 Lee Daniels, Empire Dr. Theresa Dankovich, Drinkable Book Christine Day, Luvo Ken Denman, Emotient Mikey Dickerson, U.S. Digital Service Peter DiLaura, Second Genome Carolyn Duran, Intel Eric Eriksson, Facebook Craig Erwich, Hulu Nicola Farinetti, Eataly U.S.A. Jennifer Fremont-Smith, Krash Phil Fremont-Smith, Krash Robb Fujioka, Fuhu Taro Fukuyama, AnyPerk Eric Garcetti, Los Angeles mayor Randy Garutti, Shake Shack Lisa Gersh, Goop Lisa Gelobter, U.S. Department of Education Jason Goldman, U.S. Chief digital officer Dr. Corey Goodman, Second Genome Brian Grazer, New Form Digital John Green, VlogBrothers Kristin Groos Richmond, Revolution Foods Karyn Hillman, Levi Strauss Lisa Holme, Hulu Mike Hopkins, Hulu Drew Houston, Dropbox Rosalind Hudnell, Intel Steve Huffman, Reddit Naoki Ito, Party Belinda Johnson, Airbnb Ron Johnson, Enjoy Susan Kare, Graphic Designer Alex Kauffmann, Google Robert Kirkman, Skybound Entertainment Jenni Konner, Lenny Letter Dr. Klaus Lackner, Center for Negative Carbon Emissions John Landgraf, FX Network Julie Larson-Green, Microsoft Sahil Lavingia, Gumroad Jessica Livingston, Y Combinator Susan Lyne, BBG Ventures at AOL Erik Logan, OWN Network Rose Marcario, Patagonia Kim Mathews, Mathews Nielsen Michael McDaniel, Reaction Inc. Melissa McCarthy, Actress/entrepreneur Jonathan Mildenhall, Airbnb Rebecca Minkoff, Rebecca Minkoff Uri Minkoff, Rebecca Minkoff Helena Morrissey, 30% Club Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Physician/author Signe Nielsen, Mathews Nielsen Barack Obama, U.S. president Gwyneth Paltrow, Goop Dev Patnaik, Jump Associates Richard Plepler, HBO Scorpio Ramazani Khoury, Made in Kigali Cecile Richards, Planned Parenthood Ben Rivera, Leatherman Michele Roberts, NBPA Tara Russell, Fathom Kirsten Saenz Tobey, Revolution Foods Sheri Salata, OWN Network Nathan Seidle, SparkFun Tony Scott, U.S. Chief information officer Shivani Siroya, InVenture Brad Smith, Intuit Boyan Slat, The Ocean Cleanup Beatrice Springborn, Hulu Tom Staggs, Disney Ellen Stofan, NASA Yuri Suzuki, Yuri Suzuki Ltd. Nikki Sylianteng, To Park or Not to Park Hiro Takeuchi, Harvard Business School Lorraine Twohill, Google Haley Van Dyck, U.S. Digital Service Jorgen Vig Knudstorp, Lego Group Ken Washington, Ford Matthew Weaver, U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs Billie Whitehouse, Wearable Experiments Bayard Winthrop, American Giant Idit Yaniv, Facebook Malala Yousafzai, The Malala Fund Katharine Zaleski, PowerToFly Dr. Yusheng Zhang, Apricot Forest Please join us in congratulating them on their induction into the MCP 1000, where they join an ever-growing community of visionaries, changers, and doers. In June, we'll honor another 100 leaders in the world of business with our annual Most Creative People in Business issue, which uncovers innovators who have never before been covered by the magazine.


News Article | November 23, 2016
Site: www.newsmaker.com.au

According to Stratistics MRC, the Global Human Microbiome Market is accounted for $130.23 million in 2015 and is expected to reach $521.23 million by 2022 growing at a CAGR of 21.9% during the forecast period. Increasing incidence of lifestyle diseases, growing geriatric population, and technological developments are some of the factors fueling the market growth. By product, Probiotics segment dominated the global market with largest share during the forecast period. North America and Europe commanded the market owing to the improved biotechnological and microbiological research infrastructure. However, Asia-Pacific is anticipated to grow at the highest CAGR owing to recuperating research infrastructure in the region. Some of the key players in Human Microbiome market include Ritter Pharmaceuticals, Inc., E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, ViThera Pharmaceuticals, Metabiomics Corp., ActoGeniX, Optibiotix Health Plc, Vedanta Biosciences, Inc., MicroBiome Therapeutics, LLC, Second Genome, Inc., ENTEROME Bioscience, Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd., Osel, Inc., AvidBiotics, Rebiotix Inc., Merck & Co., Inc. and Seres Therapeutics. Applications Covered: • Diagnostics • Therapeutics Diseases Covered: • Cancer • Acute Diarrhea • Diabetes • Mental Disorders • Autoimmune Disorders • Obesity • Other Diseases Products Covered: • Foods • Drugs • Probiotics • Diagnostic Devices • Prebiotics • Medical Foods o Nutritionally Incomplete Formulae o Formulae for Metabolic Disorders o Nutritionally Complete Formulae o Oral Rehydration Products • Other Probiotics Supplements   Regions Covered: • North America o US o Canada o Mexico • Europe o Germany o France o Italy o UK  o Spain o Rest of Europe       • Asia Pacific o Japan        o China        o India        o Australia        o New Zealand       o Rest of Asia Pacific • Rest of the World o Middle East o Brazil       o Argentina        o South Africa o Egypt What our report offers: - Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments - Market share analysis of the top industry players - Strategic recommendations for the new entrants - Market forecasts for a minimum of 7 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets - Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations) - Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations - Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends - Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments - Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements


Patent
Second Genome | Date: 2014-01-03

The disclosure provides methods and systems for characterizing the effects of an agent on one or more microbial communities.


Patent
Second Genome | Date: 2014-03-10

The disclosure provides assay methods for characterizing the effects of an agent on a microbiome of a subject. Moreover, the disclosure provides methods for practical applications of assay results. The biological sample is extracted and the microbial population is enumerated by using signals or markers specific to the microbial species. The enumerated population is subjected to the action of one or many therapeutic agents and the efficiency is assessed by deriving a score based on the effects in the individual samples and in the population of samples.


SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Dec. 9, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Second Genome, Inc., a leader in the development of novel medicines through innovative microbiome science, announced today that it has appointed Jim Sjoerdsma as executive vice president of human resources and Brian Dowd as senior...

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