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Bayswater, Australia

Mattner S.W.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Wite D.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Riches D.A.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Porter I.J.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | And 2 more authors.
Biological Agriculture and Horticulture | Year: 2013

This study investigated whether kelp extract from Durvillaea potatorum and Ascophyllum nodosum (Seasol Commercial®) stimulates broccoli establishment and growth. Under controlled conditions in the glasshouse, weekly applications of kelp extract significantly increased the leaf area, stem diameter and biomass of broccoli by up to 70%, 65% and 145%, respectively. Also in the glasshouse, lower strength dilutions of kelp extract (1:200 to 1:500) were most effective in stimulating early growth of broccoli, whereas higher strength dilutions (1:25 to 1:100) were most effective later in plant development. In the field, application of kelp extract as a drench to a clay-loam soil (Sodosol) significantly increased the leaf number, stem diameter and leaf area of establishing broccoli seedlings by 6%, 10% and 9%, respectively, irrespective of application rate (three applications at 2.5 or 25 l ha-1). Furthermore, kelp extract significantly reduced the early incidence of white blister, caused by Albugo candida, on broccoli by 23%. In a sandy soil (Podosol), the effect of kelp extract was less pronounced, with only the leaf area of broccoli seedlings increasing significantly following treatment with kelp applied at the highest rate. It is hypothesized that differences in cation exchange capacity, organic matter and/or leaching properties contribute to variation in the response of broccoli to kelp extract in different soils. Future research is proposed to examine the capacity of kelp extract to offset the high nutrient inputs needed at establishment in the broccoli industry. © 2013 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis. Source


Arioli T.,Seasol International | Arioli T.,Australian National University | Mattner S.W.,Victorian Strawberry Industry Certification Authority | Mattner S.W.,La Trobe University | Winberg P.C.,University of Wollongong
Journal of Applied Phycology | Year: 2015

A rapidly growing world population has highlighted the need to significantly increase food production in the context of a world with accelerating soil and water shortages as well as climatic stressors. This situation has generated new interest in the application of liquid seaweed extracts because of their potent plant growth-enhancing properties through metabolic benefits, triggering disease response pathways and increasing stress tolerance. The basis for these benefits is complex and poorly understood. Liquid seaweed extracts are complex and have been demonstrated to possess novel mechanisms for increasing crop productivity. The benefits of seaweed extracts to crops have previously been reviewed in the context of the northern hemisphere, but not in the context of Australia, its crops and unique stressors. This review considers the application of seaweed extracts in Australian agriculture by (i) introducing the history of the Australian liquid seaweed extract industry and (ii) focusing on evidence of Australian research related to seaweed extract composition, plant growth properties during plant establishment, pathogenic disease and new approaches to phenotyping the biological efficacy of seaweed extracts. This type of research is essential for future Australian agriculture to develop effective strategies for the use of liquid seaweed extracts. © 2015, The Author(s). Source


Mattner S.W.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Mattner S.W.,La Trobe University | Villalta O.N.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Wite D.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | And 3 more authors.
Australasian Plant Disease Notes | Year: 2014

Five in vitro bioassays demonstrated a capacity for an undiluted seaweed extract, made from a combination of Durvillaea potatorum and Ascophyllum nodosum, to suppress the growth of Sclerotinia minor by 18-100 %. Inundation in the seaweed extract significantly (p ≤ 0.05) suppressed growth of sclerotia by 90 %, and reduced disease severity in lettuce seedlings. A control buffered to the same pH (8.8) as the seaweed extract also significantly (p ≤ 0.05) suppressed the growth of sclerotia, but only by 22 %. This suggests that pH only partially explains the suppressive effect of the extract against S. minor, and undiscovered modes of action exist. © 2014, Australasian Plant Pathology Society Inc. Source


Wite D.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Mattner S.W.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Mattner S.W.,La Trobe University | Porter I.J.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Applied Phycology | Year: 2015

A sand solution technique demonstrated the capacity for a commercial seaweed extract from Durvillaea potatorum and Ascophyllum nodosum (Seasol Commercial®) to significantly suppress infection of broccoli by Plasmodiophora brassicae. In the primary stages of infection, the extract reduced the number of plasmodia formed in the root hairs by 55 %. Later, in the secondary stages of infection, the extract reduced plasmodia in the root cortical cells by up to 84 %. The suppression of infection was found to be independent of the dilution of the extract applied (1:25 and 1:500). The basis for these results is unlikely to be a nutrient or pH effect since the extract had little impact on these parameters, particularly at the lower dilution (1:200). Rather, we hypothesise that the suppression of infection by the seaweed extract was due to its stimulation of resistance mechanisms in the host, which is possibly related to laminarins in the extract and/or the effect of exogenous growth regulators or undiscovered molecules in the extract disrupting the infection process. © 2015 The Author(s) Source

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