SEALS Microbiology

Sydney, Australia

SEALS Microbiology

Sydney, Australia

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Siah S.P.,Prince of Wales Hospital | Merif J.,Prince of Wales Hospital | Kaur K.,Prince of Wales Hospital | Nair J.,Prince of Wales Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Pathology | Year: 2014

We aimed to streamline the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease by producing multiplexed real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panels employing universal sample processing for DNA and RNA containing pathogens. A total of 487 stored, previously characterised stool samples comprising bacterial, viral, protozoan and Clostridium difficile positive samples were tested using four multiplexed real time PCR panels. A further 81 pre-selected clinical samples from a teaching hospital were included to provide an independent validation of assay performance. Improved sensitivity was achieved using the protozoan panels and 16 more mixed infections were observed compared to tests with conventional methods. Using the C. difficile panels, 100% sensitivity was achieved when compared to the gold standard of toxigenic culture. In addition, hypervirulent strains including ribotype 027 could be identified directly from primary sample without the need for ribotyping methods. Bacterial and viral panels detecting Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Yersinia enterocolitica, Listeria monocytogenes, norovirus groups I and II, rotavirus A, astrovirus, sapovirus, rotavirus B, adenovirus and adenovirus 40/41 performed aswell as conventional methods, whilst allowing detection in 3 hours from processing to result. Multiplex real time PCR panels with universal sample preparation allow streamlined, rapid diagnosis of gastrointestinal pathogens whilst extending the characterisation of pathogens present in stool samples from affected patients. © 2013 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia.


Sievert W.,Monash University | Dore G.J.,University of New South Wales | Dore G.J.,St Vincents Hospital | Mccaughan G.W.,Royal Prince Alfred Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Hepatology | Year: 2011

Anemia may increase the likelihood of achieving a sustained virological response (SVR) during pegylated interferon and ribavirin treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To determine whether hemoglobin decline is associated with SVR, we retrospectively evaluated the CHARIOT study of 871 treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 patients. Anemia (serum hemoglobin <100 g/L) occurred in 137 (16%) patients, of whom only 14 (10%) received erythropoietin. Hemoglobin decline >30g/L from baseline occurred in 76% of patients overall, including 526 patients who did not become anemic. Virological responses were higher in anemic patients compared with those who did not develop anemia (end of treatment, 80% versus 65%, P = 0.003; SVR, 61% versus 50%, P = 0.02); these differences remained significant when patients receiving erythropoietin were excluded from analysis. SVR was also higher in patients with hemoglobin decline >30 g/L compared with patients without a similar decline. In multiple logistic regression analyses with treatment group and baseline characteristics, the odds ratio for SVR was 1.97 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.62) for anemia and 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-3.62) for hemoglobin decline >30 g/L. Patients who first developed a hemoglobin decline >30 g/L during weeks 5-12 and 13-48 were more likely to achieve SVR than those who first developed such changes in weeks 0-4 or who never experienced them. Conclusion: Patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who develop anemia or experience a hemoglobin decline >30 g/L during weeks 5-48 of therapy achieve higher virological responses to pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy that are unrelated to erythropoietin use. © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

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