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Poowakanjana S.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Park J.W.,Seafood Research and Education Center
Journal of Aquatic Food Product Technology | Year: 2012

The biochemical and gel properties of Pacific sardine and Pacific mackerel were characterized as affected by preparation and cooking methods. Four to eight times more salt soluble proteins were extracted from water-washed paste than fish protein isolate (FPI) paste. Higher total sulfhydryl content was measured in FPI, indicating the exposure of sulfhydryl groups during alkaline extraction. Comparing gel properties based on two cooking methods (slow and fast), the two pelagic fish proteins performed quite differently. Heating rate did not differentiate between surimi and FPI gels from sardine. However, mackerel exhibited higher texture values when using the fast cooking method, indicating the presence of high levels of proteolytic enzymes. Water-washed surimi gels were whiter than FPI for both species. Water retention ability appeared to be higher with mackerel than sardine, regardless of isolation and cooking method. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel eletrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) also supported a difference in processing chemistry and thermal behavior between two methods for protein isolation and cooking, respectively. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Fiberstar, Inc. (http://www.FiberstarIngredients.com), a global market leader in clean label food ingredient solutions for the food and beverage industry announced the winners to the Citri-Fi 125 Student Innovation Contest. Citri-Fi 125, a natural, non-GMO citrus fiber is one of the most recent additions to the Citri-Fi portfolio. To find new uses for this natural citrus fiber, Fiberstar launched a global innovation contest targeting University students. Over 25 applicants, globally, submitted a proposal in how to use the Citri-Fi 125. “This is the first time a program like this has been created, so we are pleased with the interest from the applicants,” says Fiberstar, Inc. President and CEO, John Haen. “We continue to support University food science programs by offering students opportunities to create food ingredient solutions for the real world.” A panel of judges ranked the students’ applications based on originality of concept, justification/market need, ingredient commercial feasibility, technical feasibility and quality of their report. A total of $25,000 was awarded amongst the six winning proposals. The following winning teams and applications are: 1st Place: Citrus Fiber as an Effective Fat Blocker in Fried Seafood: Oregon State University Seafood Research and Education Center, U.S. (Dr. Jae Park, Kaitlin Junes and Angela Hunt). Citri-Fi 125 used in a coating formulation to reduce oil pick-up not only provides potential cost savings to processors due to reduced oil usage, but this also provides manufacturers opportunities to reduce fat and calories. The study also showed yield improvement due to increased pick-up and reduced cooking losses. 2nd Place: Reduced Fat Instant Laksa Paste: Surya University, Indonesia (Sylviana, Meutia Wafa' Khairunnisa Hakim, Amelia Adinda and Bryan Raharja). Citri-Fi 125 is used to reduce the amount of coconut milk used in Laksa paste to provide potential cost savings and fat reduction. Citri-Fi 125 provides emulsification stabilization and improved mouthfeel to simulate the texture of the full-fat version. This may be applicable to other coconut milks pastes, spreads, beverages and soups found not only in Asia, but also in other parts of the world due to the growing use of coconut. 3rd Place: Citri-Crunch Healthy Savory Extruded Pork Snack: Washington State University, U.S. (Ryan Kowalski, Bon-Jae Gu, Maria Dian Pratiwi Masli, Siyuan Wang and Hongchao Zhang). Citri-Fi 125 helped reduce the oil uptake and improved the flavor by enhancing the umami flavor of monosodium glutamate when reducing the sodium. This not only aligns with the market’s need for healthier snacks, but also offers snack manufacturers cost savings opportunities in less oil usage. 4th Place: Chicken Sausage with Reduced Oil & Improved Sensory: University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka (Miss A.M. Aruni Shanika, Dr. Himali Samaraweera, Nirupa Edirisinghe, Hashinee Medika Ariyasena and Nuwan Jayawardena). Citri-Fi 125 provided emulsification stabilization and texturizing to help reduce the oil by at least 30% while maintaining a full-fat mouthfeel. This provides cost savings and health benefits due to the fat/caloric reduction. 5th Place: Calcium Fortification to Increase Viscosity and Enhance Gelling Properties: University of Guelph, Canada (Lisa Indris). Incorporating calcium with Citri-Fi 125 in liquid food formats improves the viscosity and provides improved stabilization. This enhanced feature opens doors in the natural dairy category where stabilization and mouthfeel are desired and needed. 6th Place: Natural Color Stabilizer in Berry Yammee Topping: Cornell University, U.S. (Fiona Harnischfeger, Sofía Lara, Victoria Chen, Katrina Cariño, Ana Chang, Sierra Jamir and Shiyu Cai). Citri-Fi 125 stabilizes natural colors during shelf-life to prevent phase separation and color bleeding. This benefit is crucial for consumer acceptance when using vibrant natural colors to indicate freshness. Fiberstar also offers other citrus fiber solutions via 100 series line which contains different fiber content than the 125 series, the 200 series which is citrus fiber and guar gum and the 300 series which is the citrus fiber and xanthan gum. The Citri-Fi citrus fiber product lines provide food manufacturers clean label texturizing solutions for various food products including bakery, beverages, dressings, meats, sauces and dairy. “We are excited to enhance our formulating tool box by promoting Citri-Fi 125 citrus fiber. Our team will continue working closely with our Customers to provide superior technical service support, quality product and new ideas especially those generated from the most recent innovation contest. And we look forward to connecting with Universities and students in the future to continue the collaboration.” For more information about the Innovation Contest applications, please contact Dr. Brock Lundberg at (651) 271-0328


Nguyen H.M.,Korea University | Hwang I.-C.,Central Research Institute | Park J.-W.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Park H.-J.,Korea University | Park H.-J.,Clemson University
Pest Management Science | Year: 2012

Background: In the natural environment, photodegradation is one of the most common degradative processes of pesticides. In order to reduce the photodegradation of pesticides, and so increase their killing activity against target pests, chitosan-coated beeswax solid lipid nanoparticles (CH-BSLNs) were prepared by a combination of hot homogenization and sonication, with deltamethrin as an active ingredient. Results: Under optimal conditions, the highest encapsulation efficiency (95%) and a high payload of deltamethrin (approximately 12.5%) were achieved. In direct photolysis, in the case of CH-BSLNs after UV irradiation for 24 h, 37.3% of deltamethrin remained, as opposed to only 14.6% of the free-form deltamethrin. In addition, in indirect photolysis, in the case of CH-BSLNs after UV irradiation for 2 h in 2% acetone solution, approximately 74.5% of deltamethrin remained, as opposed to only 37.6% of the free-form deltamethrin. Conclusion: CH-BSLNs showed good protection for deltamethrin against photodegradation. This novel nanocarrier may be useful in crop protection as an economical strategy to enhance the effect of pesticides in the field and protect the environment as well. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.


Poowakanjana S.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Mayer S.G.,University of Portland | Park J.W.,Seafood Research and Education Center
Journal of Food Science | Year: 2012

Rheological and Raman spectroscopic properties of surimi from three species [Alaska pollock (AP) (cold water), Pacific whiting (temperate water), and threadfin bream (warm water)] were investigated as affected by various chopping conditions. Comminuting Alaska pollock surimi at 0 °C demonstrated superior gel hardness and cohesiveness when chopping time was extended to 15-18 min; however, long chopping time at higher temperatures resulted in a significantly decreased gel texture particularly at 20 °C. Warm water fish threadfin bream exhibited higher gel texture when chopping was done longer at higher temperature. Rheological properties were significantly affected by both chopping time and temperature. Species effect, based on their thermal stability, was readily apparent. Raman spectroscopy revealed a significant change in disulfide linkage and the reduction of secondary structure upon extended chopping. Dynamic oscillation rheology demonstrated the damage of light meromyoisn and lowering of onset of gelling temperature as the chopping time was extended. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists ®.


Ngo D.-H.,Pukyong National University | Qian Z.-J.,Pukyong National University | Ryu B.,Pukyong National University | Park J.W.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Kim S.-K.,Pukyong National University
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2010

In the present study, a peptide possessing antioxidant properties was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) scale gelatin. Gelatin protein was hydrolyzed using alcalase, pronase E, trypsin and pepsin. Antioxidant efficacy of respective hydrolysates were evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical anion scavenging activities. Moreover, protective effect on DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals generated was determined. Further, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using a fluorescence probe, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA), which could be converted to highly fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF) with the presence of intracellular ROS on mouse macrophages, RAW 264.7 cells. Among hydrolysates, alcalase-derived hydrolysate exhibited the highest antioxidant activity compared to other enzymatic hydrolysates. Therefore, it was further analyzed and the sequence of an active peptide present in it was identified as Asp-Pro-Ala-Leu-Ala-Thr-Glu-Pro-Asp-Pro-Met-Pro-Phe (1382.57Da). This peptide showed no cytotoxic effect on mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7) and human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5). In addition, it scavenged hydroxyl, DPPH and superoxide radicals at the IC50 values of 7.56, 8.82 and 17.83μM, respectively. These results suggest that the peptide derived from Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) scale gelatin acts as a candidate against oxidative stress and could be used as a potential functional food ingredient. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Karadeniz F.,Pukyong National University | Kang K.-H.,Pukyong National University | Park J.W.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Park S.-J.,Pukyong National University | Kim S.-K.,Pukyong National University
Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry | Year: 2014

8,4⌄-dieckol is a natural product which has been isolated from brown alga, Ecklonia cava. This polyphenolic compound is a phlorotannin derivative with a broad range of bioactivities. Its inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) was tested and the results indicated that 8,4⌄-dieckol inhibited HIV-1 induced syncytia formation, lytic effects, and viral p24 antigen production at noncytotoxic concentrations. Furthermore, it was found that 8,4⌄-dieckol selectively inhibited the activity of HIV-1 reverse trancriptase (RT) enzyme with 91% inhibition ratio at the concentration of 50 μM. HIV-1 entry was also inhibited by 8,4⌄-dieckol. According to data from this study, 8,4⌄-dieckol is an effective compound against HIV-1 with high potential for further studies. These results suggest that it might be used as a drug candidate for the development of new generation therapeutic agents, although further studies on the mechanism of inhibition should be addressed. © 2014 Japan Society for Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Agrochemistry.


Poowakanjana S.,Seafood Research and Education Center | Park J.W.,Seafood Research and Education Center
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Salt-soluble protein, surface reactive sulfhydryl content, and surface hydrophobicity of Alaska pollock, Pacific whiting, and threadfin bream surimi were characterised, as affected by various comminution conditions. Chopping time/temperatures were explored in consideration of their habitat temperatures. Salt-soluble protein (SSP) significantly decreased when chopping time was extended. Corresponding to our follow-up study, no relationship between SSP and gel texture was found. Surface hydrophobicity was inversely proportional to SSP concentration, indicating the unfolding of protein upon comminution. Alaska pollock surimi demonstrated aggregation during chopping at 10 and 20 °C, based on the surface hydrophobicity. Surface reactive sulfhydryl (SRSH) contents of the three fish species behaved differently. The SH groups were oxidized to disulphide bonds when higher chopping temperature was applied. As a result, increased SRSH content was not observed in Alaska pollock (10 and 20 °C chopping) and threadfin bream paste (25 and 30 °C chopping). © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Seafood Research and Education Center
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of food science | Year: 2012

Rheological and Raman spectroscopic properties of surimi from three species [Alaska pollock (AP) (cold water), Pacific whiting (temperate water), and threadfin bream (warm water)] were investigated as affected by various chopping conditions. Comminuting Alaska pollock surimi at 0 C demonstrated superior gel hardness and cohesiveness when chopping time was extended to 15-18 min; however, long chopping time at higher temperatures resulted in a significantly decreased gel texture particularly at 20 C. Warm water fish threadfin bream exhibited higher gel texture when chopping was done longer at higher temperature. Rheological properties were significantly affected by both chopping time and temperature. Species effect, based on their thermal stability, was readily apparent. Raman spectroscopy revealed a significant change in disulfide linkage and the reduction of secondary structure upon extended chopping. Dynamic oscillation rheology demonstrated the damage of light meromyoisn and lowering of onset of gelling temperature as the chopping time was extended.Chopping conditions to determine gel quality and manufacture surimi seafood are varied by all manufacturers. This paper covering three primary species for surimi with their suggested optimum chopping conditions: 15 min for Alaska pollock when chopped at 0 C, 15 min for Pacific whiting at 15-20 C, and 18 min for threadfin bream at 25-30 C. The use of optimum chopping condition should maximize the value of each surimi and provide consistent quality to the end users.


PubMed | Seafood Research and Education Center
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Food chemistry | Year: 2012

Salt-soluble protein, surface reactive sulfhydryl content, and surface hydrophobicity of Alaska pollock, Pacific whiting, and threadfin bream surimi were characterised, as affected by various comminution conditions. Chopping time/temperatures were explored in consideration of their habitat temperatures. Salt-soluble protein (SSP) significantly decreased when chopping time was extended. Corresponding to our follow-up study, no relationship between SSP and gel texture was found. Surface hydrophobicity was inversely proportional to SSP concentration, indicating the unfolding of protein upon comminution. Alaska pollock surimi demonstrated aggregation during chopping at 10 and 20 C, based on the surface hydrophobicity. Surface reactive sulfhydryl (SRSH) contents of the three fish species behaved differently. The SH groups were oxidized to disulphide bonds when higher chopping temperature was applied. As a result, increased SRSH content was not observed in Alaska pollock (10 and 20 C chopping) and threadfin bream paste (25 and 30 C chopping).

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