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Carlsbad, CA, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 90.00K | Year: 2014

Seacoast Science will license, for the purpose of technology transfer, the NIST patent “Recirculating Temperature Wave Focusing Chromatography,” with the goal of successfully implementing the method into a unique, low-cost gas chromatograph for environmental pollution monitoring. In the U.S., there are over 425,000 brownfields and 1,320 Superfund sites where noxious chemicals have been used and unhealthy levels of noxious chemicals may remain in the soil and subterranean water. The noxious vapors, most of which are considered carcinogens; pass through the soil and groundwater into homes, schools, businesses, watersheds, aquifers, and municipal water systems on or near these formerly contaminated sites. EPA estimates that cleanup and redevelopment programs leverage $14 billion in economic benefit and support 60,917 jobs. Thus, the objective is to develop means to monitor remediated sites to achieve productivity while assuring a healthy environment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 991.56K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Several US agencies and regulators require low-cost chemical sensors for detecting and monitoring environmental clean-up, remediation, and decommissioning processes where groundwater may be contaminated. The sensors must be capable of detecting contaminants in the sub-surface groundwater and must be compatible with use in a range of environments. Most significantly, these customers require a low-cost alternative to its current expensive and labor intensive methods, namely using mobile laboratories. The project will result in the innovative use of low-cost sensor systems that will be capable of detecting and monitoring for dense non-aqueous phase liquids in the subsurface and groundwater, unattended, and in real- time fromwithin a push-probe, using a chemicapacitor array and miniature preconcentrator. The ultimate goal of this SBIR project is to provide the DOD, DOE, and other agencies with a method to map and track subsurface contamination plumes in real-time without requiring an operator. In Phase I, Seacoast successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a microsensor array with a proprietary trap-and- purge preconcentrator to detect chlorinated solvents, specifically TCE, and TCA, at levels low enough to meet EPA mandated levels for drinking water. In Phase II Seacoast proposes to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of the system to better meet the needs identified by the Phase I consultant. The systems have MEMS microcapacitor sensor arrays that can monitor forleaks of toxic chemicals, contaminants from wastes, and changes in groundwater streams. A preconcentrator traps the contaminants and releases them to a microsensor array. These sensor arrays are filled with several chemoselective polymers whose dielectricpermittivity changes when exposed to different vapors, creating a fingerprint response for each chemical. In Phase II Seacoast will specifically develop new materials to improve the sensor array selectivity, 1) by using impedance spectroscopy to study the mechanisms by which the polymer-based sensors sorb the target chemicals, 2) by implementing pattern recognition algorithms to identify chemicals for the sensor responses, and 3) by designing new preconcentrator materials that can bind these chemicals more strongly. The most important application to public health and safety is unattended monitoring of drinking water, water treatment processes, and water sources. Potential markets include building chemical process monitoring and control, toxic vapor leak detection, industrial process control, and industrial health and safety. Transitioning the developed prototype to other markets where worker and public health, environmental health and regulatory compliance will be investigated to reduce the financial risksand broaden the acceptance of the technology. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This proposal describes a novel technology that specifically addresses the need for detecting groundwater contaminants and long-term monitoring of contaminated sites, by providing an unattended sensor system that tracks contamination in real-time and transmits contaminant concentrations. Such a system would be used in tandem with other methods, to provide comprehensive contamination management at DOE, DOD, and Superfund sites where ground and water clean-up projects are already underway. The proposed work will focus on detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are described as among the most common pollutants in groundwater and soils at DOE sites.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2015

Seacoast Science has licensed, for the purpose of technology transfer, the NIST patent “Recirculating Temperature Wave Focusing Chromatography,” with the goal of implementing the technology into a unique environmental monitor. Seacoast believes the NIST technology can improve Seacoast’s environmental monitor, allowing for an order of magnitude cost reduction for long-term monitoring at remediation sites. In the U.S., the EPA has identified over 425,000 brownfields and 1,320 Superfund sites where hazardous chemicals have been used and unhealthy levels of these chemicals may remain in the soil and subterranean water. Seacoast will develop an environmental monitor, with emphasis toward petrochemicals and chlorinated solvents, to install at these remediated sites to assure a healthy environment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Seacoast Science Inc is proposing to develop certify and then commercialize comfort wear non invasive monitors that predict physiological alcohol impairment in humans based on transdermal ethanol measurements Using best practice miniaturization methods we will build the monitors into clothing arm bracelets pendants or decorative accessories Such monitors will have immediate application in the effort to combat alcohol misuse These monitors are based on catalytic alcohol sensors that have proven to be reliable in breathalyzers The work leverages Seacoastandapos s experience in designing alcohol detectors for various applications along with work embedding sensors in articles of clothing Impact Alcohol abuse and impairment cause significant damage to lives and property in the US and globally The Centers for Disease Control published a report that alcohol abuse in the United States caused deaths and resulted in $ billion financial cost for The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration reported fatalities in alcohol involved motor vehicle crashes in Worldwide the World Health Organization reports million deaths every year resulting from alcohol abuse representing of all deaths Overall of the global burden of disease and injury is attributable to alcohol as measured in disability adjusted life years DALYs Alcohol consumption causes death and disability relatively early in life In the age group years approximately of the total deaths ar alcohol attributable PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Alcohol abuse and impairment cause significant damage to lives and property in the US and globally Legal mandates often require repeat alcohol abusers to wear personal alcohol monitors however non compliance is extensive We see an opportunity to miniaturize these sensors and incorporate them into apparel or fashion accessories improve comfort and reduce unsightliness and stigma when use of the monitors is prudent or mandatory


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

Seacoast proposes to develop a design for a wearable microdetector system that is tuned specifically for fuel-related pollutants. The system contains sensors modified with conductive graphene, to make lightweight, ultra-sensitive detectors. During the past few years there has been increasing interest in using new technologies for community-based monitoring applications, for example, for pollutants that can harm a large number of people in a specific area. However, thus far no detectors have been developed that meet the price-point to make them acceptable to the average person to carry a chemical sensor with them. Currently available sensor systems are large and expensive, requiring training to operate, or come as kits which require sample preparation and special handling. In either case, wide distribution of chemical detectors is not yet possible. By the end of Phase I, Seacoast will complete a sensor system design, evaluate materials and components, and develop a Phase II test and validation plan. Integrated display and wireless data transmission will allow for centralized logging and chemical exposure tracking, enabling crowd-sourced chemical exposure monitoring.

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