Carlsbad, CA, United States
Carlsbad, CA, United States

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Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

To provide additional telemetry and data for long-term mission, the composition of internal atmosphere of spacesuits must be determined. Specifically, the unambiguous detection and quantification of carbon dioxide is crucial for mission completion. Detection of other gasses (ammonia, oxygen) is also necessary for a complete sensor suite. Seacoast Science and Case Western Reserve University propose a sensor suite for the sensitive and selective detection of CO2 and other specified gasses. This will be accomplished using Seacoast?s proprietary sensor and the application of specially polymers developed in the laboratory of Professor Rigoberto Advincula. We will develop a microsensor array for atmospheric gases, specifically CO2 and NH3 (Phase I) and integrate it into a compact mission-ready sensor suite. In Phase I the feasibility of developing the proposed system will be demonstrated. In Phase II a further optimized system will be fabricated, tested and delivered to NASA for validation.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2014

Seacoast proposes to develop a low-cost system that can directly monitor chemicals emitted from crops, over a period of days to months, and analyze these chemicals for the indicators of crop stress. Researchers have found a number of chemicals that are emitted when certain plants are under attack from biotic or abiotic stresses. One example, methyl salicylate (MeS) has been found by researchers to be an indicator of thermal, viral, and bacterial stress in walnut trees, tobacco and tomato plants. Thus a monitoring system can be used by growers for site-specific management of insecticides. The system will be optimized for use in greenhouses and could provide a prognostic tool, indicating when crops are in danger before it is too late. The goal is to prevent yield loss, especially for high value crops. Seacoast has previously demonstrated detection of MeS, alpha-pinene and other published volatile plant allomones, with and without preconcentration. In this program, Seacoast will demonstrate detection of a number of plant-stress related volatiles, and push detection limits to the ppb range by identifying the optimal detector technologies to integrate with a low-cost chromatographic system and trap-and-purge preconcentrator.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.34M | Year: 2016

Project Summary The overall objective in the proposed project is to develop and test a prototype Cyanalyzer sensor designed for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of cyanide exposure The proposed device directly addresses a long term goal of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke NIH Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats CounterACT program development of rapid diagnostic tests and assays to identify biological markers consistent with cyanide exposure and the level of exposure Phase I equivalent research demonstrated that the current laboratory based Cyanalyzer prototype meets or exceeds each requirement necessary for rapid and accurate on site cyanide diagnosis currently diagnostic accuracy based a standard animal model of cyanide exposure N samples rabbits each with one blank non exposed and cyanide exposed samples rapid analysis time s sensitivity the limit of detection M is well below the threshold of exposure M which was set based on the maximum reported blood cyanide concentrations of smokers small sample volume L selectivity precision andlt relative standard deviation and accuracy During this Direct to Phase II SBIR project Seacoast Science Inc SSI in collaboration with South Dakota State University SDSU the University of California Irvine UCI and the Midwest Research Institute MRI propose carrying the Cyanalyzer from a research stage comprehensive analytical tool to advanced prototype development animal trials and completion of sufficient production units for a follow on multisite clinical trial The following specific aims are proposed to accomplish this objective Design and production of an optimized prototype of the academic cyanide diagnostic sensor units Method validation laboratory testing animal testing rabbit UCI and mouse MRI and analytical confirmation of the optimized prototype and Incorporation of lessons learned from specific aim scale up and initial production of approximately Cyanalyzer units for future multi site Phase III clinical trials Throughout all tasks Seacoast Science and SDSU will work with a FDA consulting firm to insure that appropriate steps are met to meet regulatory requirements necessary for device sales Project Narrative Cyanide is a potent toxin with extensive industrial use potential terrorist use and is a significant danger to fire fighters and civilians due to its presence in smoke from residential and industrial fires Seacoast Science proposes the production and testing of a medical laboratory device to diagnose cyanide exposure where no diagnostic is currently available The research plan for this proposal is divided into three tasks design and production of an advanced prototype confirmation of the device performance based on accurate diagnoses in two animal species and production of multiple units for future clinical trials


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 221.43K | Year: 2016

Project Summary This Small Business Technology Transfer Phase I project proposes the development and optimization of a commercially viable novel polymer based radiation dosimeter for wide spread deployment The radiation dosimeter proposed herein is a disruptive technology with a significant market Although many commercial radiation dosimeters measure individual radiation load dose quantification and exposure timing the value proposition of the device described herein is the equivalent performance with a fold reduction in price Upon optimization commercialization and production the dosimeter will allow the real time individual radiation exposure Initial products will target niche markets with higher radiation exposure probability such as nuclear power plant personnel Further optimization in sensitivity will open broader markets such medical applications i e x ray technician and in radiation oncology Finally in service to the overall goal of NIEHS to provide sensors for environmental monitoring the cost and performance of the proposed dosimeter will allow widespread personnel deployment to determine the individual radiation load for a large population Hence Seacoast Science Inc and Professor Timothy Swager MIT jointly propose this dosimeter based on underlying principles technology developed at MIT Angewandte Chemie In that initial work a two electrode conductive dosimeter was coated with a multi walled carbon nanotube MWCNT polymer blend upon exposure to gamma radiation the measured conductance increased from increased interconnected nanocircuitry Despite impressive results the conductive measurement required sensitive research grade electronics Furthermore the initial polymer MWCNT polymer blends displayed sub optimum sensitivity Technical hurdles are addressed in this project optimizing the polymer MWCNT sensitivity use of a more sensitive dosimeter platform and design fabrication of an appropriate badge size readout Accordingly during this Phase I project a series of polyolefin sulfones with side groups selected for optimal polymer MWCNT interaction and maximum radiation gamma cross sectional area will be synthesized at MIT These polymers will be combined with different grades of multi walled carbon nanotubes to produce novel blends The blends will be coated onto Seacoast Science s proprietary capacitive sensor platform and appropriate accompanying electronics will be designed and fabricated The analytical performance of these novel dosimeters will then be determined using the radiation source at MIT The underlying hypothesis is that the sensor microstructure and the capacitive transducer will result in enhanced sensitivity when combined with the Swager polymer CNT materials in these radiation dosimeters Because the radiation induced depolymerization gives rise to increased CNT CNT contacts the distance over which charge can be polarized also dramatically increases These space charge effects are the largest contributor to a capacitance and will be easily measured at much lower radiation exposures than exposures required to form a percolating conductive network between electrodes The analytical performance of the dosimeters will be determined by exposure to increasing doses of gamma radiation the response measured and the optimal polymer blends selected for further Phase II development Project Narrative This Phase I Small Business Technology Transfer project proposes the development and optimization of a low cost commercially viable novel radiation dosimeter The badge sized device will allow population based studies of radiation exposure The device will also improve worker health in high risk industries by allowing a real time exposure detection and time integrated dosimetry and by noting the time and extent of exposure rather than the total radiation load averaged over a certain time period


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

Seacoast proposes to develop a design for a wearable microdetector system that is tuned specifically for fuel-related pollutants. The system contains sensors modified with conductive graphene, to make lightweight, ultra-sensitive detectors. During the past few years there has been increasing interest in using new technologies for community-based monitoring applications, for example, for pollutants that can harm a large number of people in a specific area. However, thus far no detectors have been developed that meet the price-point to make them acceptable to the average person to carry a chemical sensor with them. Currently available sensor systems are large and expensive, requiring training to operate, or come as kits which require sample preparation and special handling. In either case, wide distribution of chemical detectors is not yet possible. By the end of Phase I, Seacoast will complete a sensor system design, evaluate materials and components, and develop a Phase II test and validation plan. Integrated display and wireless data transmission will allow for centralized logging and chemical exposure tracking, enabling crowd-sourced chemical exposure monitoring.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 991.56K | Year: 2011

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Several US agencies and regulators require low-cost chemical sensors for detecting and monitoring environmental clean-up, remediation, and decommissioning processes where groundwater may be contaminated. The sensors must be capable of detecting contaminants in the sub-surface groundwater and must be compatible with use in a range of environments. Most significantly, these customers require a low-cost alternative to its current expensive and labor intensive methods, namely using mobile laboratories. The project will result in the innovative use of low-cost sensor systems that will be capable of detecting and monitoring for dense non-aqueous phase liquids in the subsurface and groundwater, unattended, and in real- time fromwithin a push-probe, using a chemicapacitor array and miniature preconcentrator. The ultimate goal of this SBIR project is to provide the DOD, DOE, and other agencies with a method to map and track subsurface contamination plumes in real-time without requiring an operator. In Phase I, Seacoast successfully demonstrated the feasibility of using a microsensor array with a proprietary trap-and- purge preconcentrator to detect chlorinated solvents, specifically TCE, and TCA, at levels low enough to meet EPA mandated levels for drinking water. In Phase II Seacoast proposes to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of the system to better meet the needs identified by the Phase I consultant. The systems have MEMS microcapacitor sensor arrays that can monitor forleaks of toxic chemicals, contaminants from wastes, and changes in groundwater streams. A preconcentrator traps the contaminants and releases them to a microsensor array. These sensor arrays are filled with several chemoselective polymers whose dielectricpermittivity changes when exposed to different vapors, creating a fingerprint response for each chemical. In Phase II Seacoast will specifically develop new materials to improve the sensor array selectivity, 1) by using impedance spectroscopy to study the mechanisms by which the polymer-based sensors sorb the target chemicals, 2) by implementing pattern recognition algorithms to identify chemicals for the sensor responses, and 3) by designing new preconcentrator materials that can bind these chemicals more strongly. The most important application to public health and safety is unattended monitoring of drinking water, water treatment processes, and water sources. Potential markets include building chemical process monitoring and control, toxic vapor leak detection, industrial process control, and industrial health and safety. Transitioning the developed prototype to other markets where worker and public health, environmental health and regulatory compliance will be investigated to reduce the financial risksand broaden the acceptance of the technology. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: This proposal describes a novel technology that specifically addresses the need for detecting groundwater contaminants and long-term monitoring of contaminated sites, by providing an unattended sensor system that tracks contamination in real-time and transmits contaminant concentrations. Such a system would be used in tandem with other methods, to provide comprehensive contamination management at DOE, DOD, and Superfund sites where ground and water clean-up projects are already underway. The proposed work will focus on detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons, which are described as among the most common pollutants in groundwater and soils at DOE sites.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 90.00K | Year: 2014

Seacoast Science will license, for the purpose of technology transfer, the NIST patent “Recirculating Temperature Wave Focusing Chromatography,” with the goal of successfully implementing the method into a unique, low-cost gas chromatograph for environmental pollution monitoring. In the U.S., there are over 425,000 brownfields and 1,320 Superfund sites where noxious chemicals have been used and unhealthy levels of noxious chemicals may remain in the soil and subterranean water. The noxious vapors, most of which are considered carcinogens; pass through the soil and groundwater into homes, schools, businesses, watersheds, aquifers, and municipal water systems on or near these formerly contaminated sites. EPA estimates that cleanup and redevelopment programs leverage $14 billion in economic benefit and support 60,917 jobs. Thus, the objective is to develop means to monitor remediated sites to achieve productivity while assuring a healthy environment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Commerce | Branch: National Institute of Standards and Technology | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2015

Seacoast Science has licensed, for the purpose of technology transfer, the NIST patent “Recirculating Temperature Wave Focusing Chromatography,” with the goal of implementing the technology into a unique environmental monitor. Seacoast believes the NIST technology can improve Seacoast’s environmental monitor, allowing for an order of magnitude cost reduction for long-term monitoring at remediation sites. In the U.S., the EPA has identified over 425,000 brownfields and 1,320 Superfund sites where hazardous chemicals have been used and unhealthy levels of these chemicals may remain in the soil and subterranean water. Seacoast will develop an environmental monitor, with emphasis toward petrochemicals and chlorinated solvents, to install at these remediated sites to assure a healthy environment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2015

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant Seacoast Science Inc is proposing to develop certify and then commercialize comfort wear non invasive monitors that predict physiological alcohol impairment in humans based on transdermal ethanol measurements Using best practice miniaturization methods we will build the monitors into clothing arm bracelets pendants or decorative accessories Such monitors will have immediate application in the effort to combat alcohol misuse These monitors are based on catalytic alcohol sensors that have proven to be reliable in breathalyzers The work leverages Seacoastandapos s experience in designing alcohol detectors for various applications along with work embedding sensors in articles of clothing Impact Alcohol abuse and impairment cause significant damage to lives and property in the US and globally The Centers for Disease Control published a report that alcohol abuse in the United States caused deaths and resulted in $ billion financial cost for The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration reported fatalities in alcohol involved motor vehicle crashes in Worldwide the World Health Organization reports million deaths every year resulting from alcohol abuse representing of all deaths Overall of the global burden of disease and injury is attributable to alcohol as measured in disability adjusted life years DALYs Alcohol consumption causes death and disability relatively early in life In the age group years approximately of the total deaths ar alcohol attributable PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE Alcohol abuse and impairment cause significant damage to lives and property in the US and globally Legal mandates often require repeat alcohol abusers to wear personal alcohol monitors however non compliance is extensive We see an opportunity to miniaturize these sensors and incorporate them into apparel or fashion accessories improve comfort and reduce unsightliness and stigma when use of the monitors is prudent or mandatory


Patent
Seacoast Science, Inc. | Date: 2013-12-02

The present invention relates to the field of chemical detection. Specifically, the invention provides devices that respond quickly to various target chemical analytes present in the environment. Responses are based on a change in an electrical property (such as impedance or resistance) caused by adsorption or absorption of the target analyte(s) to or in a substrate-free chemical sensing element. The chemical sensing element is composed of a thin, electrically conductive polymer material (due to doping of structural polymer material(s) with electrically conductive particles and/or the use of electrically conductive polymer material(s)), which can allow vapors to pass through with little pressure drop. The chemical sensing material is either suspended in the environment, or emplaced adjacent to one or between two porous membranes, resulting in a sensing patch capable of high gas or vapor flux through the chemical sensing element.

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